Hettinger’s Bibliography (mainly on)

ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY, INCLUDING ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS, ENVIRONMENTAL AESTHETICS, AND ANIMAL ETHICS

Note: This is unedited and there are lots of spelling and other mistakes


GRF Ferrari, “The Meaninglessness of Gardens” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68, 1 Winter 2010.


Marion Hourdequin, “Doing, Allowing, and Precaution” Environmental Ethics 29, 4 2007 339-358.


Ethics of climate change, suggestions


(1) I got thinking about key articles or texts in climate change ethics after being beckoned to the latest issue of Essays in Philosophy by Phil Cafaro: http://commons.pacificu.edu/ei. I agree with Phil, the first article is a bracing read.

 

(2) Dale Jamieson reminded me of his contributions, some of which are available at his website: http://philosophy.fas.nyu.edu/object/dalejamieson.html. His Moralitys Progress also contains at least one important early article, Ethics, Public Policy, and Global Warming.

(3) Dale also mentioned the work of Simon Caney and Henry Shue. I have some of Shues articles, and can get the names of them if you are interested.

(4) Paul Harris mentioned his latest book, World Ethics and Climate Change: From International to Global Justicehttp://www.eupjournals.com/book/978-0-7486-3910-6).

(5) Jennifer Kent suggested Mike Hulme's book Why we disagree about climate change interesting http://www.amazon.com/Disagree-About-Climate-Change-Understanding/dp/0521727324/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1267117841&sr=1-1-fkmr0).

I would also add--

(6) Stephen Gardiners articles:http://faculty.washington.edu/smgard/.

(7) Climate Ethics: Essential Readings edited by Gardiner, Caney, Jamieson, and Shue (http://www.amazon.com/Climate-Ethics-Essential-Stephen-Gardiner/dp/0195399617/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267117633&sr=1-3


(7) James Garveys The Ethics of Climate Change (http://www.amazon.com/Ethics-Climate-Change-Right-Warming/dp/0826497373/ref=pd_sim_b_1), which has worked well for me in introductory courses


Nussbaum, Martha C. Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, and Species Membership. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006. Nussbaums third new frontier in justice is the moral status of nonhuman animals.


Ilea, Ramona, “Nussbaum’s Capabilities Approach and Nonhuman Animals: theory and Public Policy,” Journal of Social Philosophy 39, 4 (Winter 2008): 547-563.


noel carroll can gove funding of arts be justified jAE 21 1 21-35


“Is there a moral obligation to limit family size? Scott Wisor, Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly, 29, 3/4 (Summer/fall 2009) I have

Volume 12, Issue 3 of Ethics, Place & Environment is now out at bookstands.

Target Article o Greenhouse Development Rights: A Proposal for a Fair Global Climate Treaty, Paul Baer; Tom Athanasiou; Sivan Kartha; Eric Kemp-Benedict, Pages 267 281

· Open Peer Commentaries

o Distinguishing Mitigation and Adaptation, Steve Vanderheiden , Pages 283 286

o Capacity and Capabilities: A Response to the Greenhouse Development Rights Framework, David Schlosberg, Pages 287 290

o Revising Responsibility in a Proposal for Greenhouse Development Rights, Marion Hourdequin, Pages 291 295

o A Simple Metric for Fair Burden Sharing? Jozef Keulartz, Pages 297 300

o Preference Aggregation and Individual Development Rights, Kenneth Shockley, Pages 301 304

o Contra Watermelons, Walter Block, Pages 305 308

o Saving the World is a Universal Duty: Comment on Baer, William Vanderburgh, Pages 309 312

· Features

o Nepal's Green Forests; A ThickAesthetics of Contested Landscapes, Andrea Nightingale, Pages 313 330

o Foucault, the Consumer Culture and Environmental Degradation, Ron Wagler, Pages 331 336

· Symposium

o Making Theory, Making Sense: Comments on Ronald Moore's Natural Beauty, Arnold Berleant, Pages 337 341

o When Philosophers Want to Have it All: Comments on Ron Moore's Syncretic Theory of Natural Beauty, Stephanie Ross, Pages 343 349

o Science, Nature, and Moore's Syncretic Aesthetic , Glenn Parsons, Pages 351 356

o The Syncretic Approach to Natural Beauty: What It Is and What It Isnt, Ronald Moore, Pages 357 365

 

J. Steven Picou, Duane Gill and Maurie Cohen title "The Exxon Valdez Disaster: Readings on a Modern Social Problem". Book info Jan 2010




The Ways That Nature Matters: The World and the Earth in the Thought of Hannah Arendt

Anne Chapman Environmental Values 16(2007): 433-445


Chessa, Frank. "Endangered Species and the Right to Die." Environmental Ethics 27 (2005): 23-41.


A defense of abortion, Judith Jarvis Thompson available at:

http://spot.colorado.edu/~heathwoo/Phil160,Fall02/thomson.htm


Nickolas Pappas

Fashion Seen as Something Imitative and Foreign

Brit J Aesthetics, January 2008; 48: 1 - 19.

*......January 2008 research-article Articles Fashion Seen as Something Imitative and Foreign...Philosophers have recently begun to write about fashion in dress. They acknowledge that philosophy...subject altogether or else disparaged fashion. They do not observe that those past philosophers......



Dance:


33. Dance , Noel Carroll in Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003)


Raymond Durgnat

ROCK, RHYTHM AND DANCE

Brit J Aesthetics, 1971; 11: 28 - 47.


David Carr

MEANING IN DANCE

Brit J Aesthetics, 1997; 37: 349 - 366.


Ross, Stephanie. "Landscape Perception: Theory-Laden, Emotionally Resonant, Politically Correct." Environmental Ethics 27 (2005):245-263. Our primal ability to see one thing in terms of another shapes our landscape perception. Although modes of appreciation are tied to personal interests and situations, there are many lines of conflict and incompatibility between these modes. A religious point of view is unacceptable to those without religious beliefs. Background knowledge is similarly required for taking an arts or science-based view of landscape, although this knowledge can be acquired. How to cultivate responses grounded in imagination, emotion, and instinct is less clear, but advocates are eager to spell out notions of virtuous exercise and effective schooling. Carlson's science-based theory often gets the most attention because he has refined and defended it over many years, but there is a place in aesthetic nature appreciation for the formal or design elements he dismisses as well as for religious, imaginative, emotional, and ambient responses. To date, the normative aspects of these theories have been presented sketchily at best. Working out these details will chart a way for landscape appreciation to become politically correct. (EE)


R. Stecker, Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Value,” Philosophy Compass 1 1-10.

N Evernden, 1983, “Beauty and Nothingness” Prairie as Failed Resource,” Landscape Magazine 27 1-8.



`Animals Do It Too!': The Franklin Defence of Meat-Eating Author: Telfer, Elizabeth

Source: Journal of Moral Philosophy, Volume 1, Number 1, 2004 , pp. 51-67(17) The Franklin defence of meat-eating is the claim that meat-eating is morally permissible because animals eat other animals. I examine five versions of this defence. I argue that two versions, claiming respectively that might is right and that animals deserve to be eaten, can easily be dismissed, and that the version based on a claim that God intends us to eat animals is theologically controversial. I go on to show that the two other versions—one claiming that meat-eating is natural, the other that it is inconsistent to condemn human meat-eating without also trying to prevent animals eating other animals—present some difficulties for the moral vegetarian.

 

Donald Worster. A Passion for Nature: The Life of John Muir. Oxford Oxford University Press, 2008. 544 pp. $34.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-19-516682-8.

Precautionary Principle: E-journal: C.F. Cranor (2004). "Toward Understanding Aspects of the Precautionary Principle". J. Of Philosophy and Medicine 29(2004): 259-79.

1.

 Janis Driscoll, “Attitudes Toward Animals: Species Ratings,” Society and Animals, 3 (1995):139-150.


Christopher Preston, draft, “Epistemology and Design: Shaping the Environments that Shape Us” aka “Epistemology, aesthetics and design”


Denis Arnold, The Ethics of Global Business (Blackwell) and the editor, or co-editor, of several books including Rising Above Sweatshops: Innovative Approaches to Global Labor Challenges (Praeger)


Food, Inc. weaves together the stories of farmers and others in agriculture-related enterprises facing Monsanto lawsuits for patent infringement; families stricken by foodborne illness; and animals fed inappropriate diets in CAFOs (confined animal feeding operations). It features food journalists Michael Pollan (The Omnivore's Dilemma) and Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation, also coproducer of Food, Inc.), Stonyfield Farm's Gary Hirshberg, and celebrity organic farmer Joel Salatin. In the style of An Inconvenient Truth, the movie encourages viewers to take action by urging changes in government policies while opting for local and organic foods whenever possible. Congresswoman Louise Slaughter's office is sponsoring a screening of the film this week for congressional staffers and others


Ernest Partridge Gadfly Enterprises, “Climate Reality Bites the Libertarians" Simply stated, the causes and remedies of global warming are flatly incompatible with the libertarian doctrine (e.g., "market absolutism") that has captivated our politics and pervaded our mass media for the past generation, which you can find here: www.crisispapers.org/essays8p/climate.htm


Nick Zangwill, "Clouds of Illusion in the Aesthetics of Nature", Philosophical Quarterly, 2009.


The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution by Denis Dutton # Publisher: Bloomsbury USA # Pub. Date: December 2008 # ISBN-13: 9781596914018

            In a groundbreaking new book that does for art what Stephen Pinker’s The Language Instinct did for linguistics, Denis Dutton overturns a century of art theory and criticism and revolutionizes our understanding of the arts. The Art Instinct combines two fascinating and contentious disciplines—art and evolutionary science—in a provocative new work that will change forever the way we think about the arts, from painting to literature to movies to pottery. Human tastes in the arts, Dutton argues, are evolutionary traits, shaped by Darwinian selection. They are not, as the past century of art criticism and academic theory would have it, just “socially constructed.”

Our love of beauty is inborn, and many aesthetic tastes are shared across remote cultures—just one example is the widespread preference for landscapes with water and distant trees, like the savannas where we evolved. Using forceful logic and hard evidence, Dutton shows that we must premise art criticism on an understanding of evolution, not on abstract “theory.” He restores the place of beauty, pleasure, and skill as artistic values.

            Sure to provoke discussion in scientific circles and uproar in the art world, The Art Instinct offers radical new insights into both the nature of art and the workings of the human mind.

The New York Times - Anthony Gottlieb Although he endorses the popular form of evolutionary psychology in principle, [Dutton's] practice is more nuanced. His discussion of the arts and of our responses to them is uniformly insightful and penetrating, and I doubt whether much of it really depends on the ideas of evolutionary psychology. His considered view (though he sometimes strays into more ambitious explorations) is that Darwinian aesthetics sheds light on literature, music and painting not by demonstrating them to be evolutionary adaptations, but by showing how their existence and character are connected to prehistoric preferences, interests and capacities. This is a reasonable aim…


Moral Knowledge: Real and Grounded in Place, Pages 175 - 186
Author: Christopher J. Preston Ethics, Place & Environment: A Journal of Philosophy & Geography Volume 12 Issue 2


Josh Dolan, “Re-Wilding North America” Nature 436, 913-914 (18 August 2005) A plan to restore animals that disappeared 13,000 years ago from Pleistocene North America offers an alternative conservation strategy for the twenty-first century, argue Josh Donlan and colleagues.


—Arntzen, Sven, and Emily Brady, eds. Humans in the Land: The Ethics and Aesthetics of the

Cultural Landscape. Oslo: Oslo Academic Press, 2008. Contents include: (1) “Introduction:

Environmental Philosophy and Cultural Landscape” by Sven Arntzen and Emily Brady, (2)

“Wilderness, Cultivation and Appropriation” by John O’Neill, (3) “The Complex Cultural

Landscape: Humans and the Land, Preservation and Change” by Sven Arntzen, (4) “A True

Landscape Democracy” by Finn Arler, (5) “Caring for the Land: Wainwright, the English Lakes

and an Ethic of Care” by Clare Palmer, (6) “Relating Humans and Nature Through Agricultural

Landscapes” by Emily Brady, (7) “Aesthetic and Other Values in the Rural Landscape” by John

Benson, (8) “Agriculture and the Worlds of Nature” by Pauline von Bonsdorff, (9) “Wandering

in a Landscape” by Kaia Lehari, (10) “Mountain Majesties Above Fruited Plains: Culture,

Nature, and Rocky Mountain Aesthetics” by Holmes Rolston III, and (11) “Cultural Construction

of National Landscapes and Its Consequences: Cases of Japan and the United States” by Yuriko

Saito.


—Cavell, Stanley, Cora Diamond, John McDowell, Ian Hacking, and Cary Wolfe. Philosophy

and Animal Life. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. Contents include: (1)

“Introduction: Exposures” by Cary Wolfe, (2) “The Difficulty of Reality and the Difficulty of

Philosophy” by Cora Diamond, (3) “Companionable Thinking” by Stanley Cavell, (4)

“Comment on Stanley Cavell’s ‘Companionable Thinking’” by John McDowell, and (5)

“Conclusion: Deflections” by Ian Hacking.


—Minteer, Ben A., ed. Nature in Common? Environmental Ethics and the Contested

Foundations of Environmental Policy. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009. Contents

include: (1) “Unity among Environmentalists? Debating the Values-Policy Link in

Environmental Ethics” by Ben A. Minteer, (2) “Contextualism and Norton’s Convergence

Hypothesis” by Brian K. Steverson, (3) “Convergence and Contextualism: Some Clarifications

and a Reply to Steverson” by Bryan G. Norton, (4) “Why Norton’s Approach Is Insufficient for

Environmental Ethics” by Laura Westra, (5) “Convergence in Environmental Values: An

Empirical and Conceptual Defense” by Ben A. Minteer and Robert E. Manning, (6) “The

Relevance of Environmental Ethical Theories for Policy Making” by Mikael Stenmark, (7)

“Converging versus Reconstituting Environmental Ethics” by Holmes Rolston III, (8)

“Environmental Ethics and Future Generations” by Douglas MacLean, (9) “The Convergence

Hypothesis Falsified: Implicit Intrinsic Value, Operational Rights, and De Facto Standing in the

Endangered Species Act” by J. Baird Callicott, (10) “Convergence in an Agrarian Key” by Paul

B. Thompson, (11) “Convergence and Ecological Restoration: A Counterexample” by Eric Katz,

(12) “Does a Public Environmental Philosophy Need a Convergence Hypothesis?” by Andrew

Light, (13) “The Importance of Creating an Applied Environmental Ethics: Lessons Learned

from Climate Change” by Donald A. Brown, (14) “Who Is Converging with Whom? An Open

Letter to Professor Bryan Norton from a Policy Wonk” by Daniel Sarewitz, (15) “Convergence

and Divergence: The Convergence Hypothesis Twenty Years Later” by Bryan G. Norton.


—Nelson, Michael P, and J. Baird Callicott, eds. The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing

the Great New Wilderness Debate. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2008. This is the sequel

to Callicott’s and Nelson’s previous anthology The Great New Wilderness Debate (1998).

Contents include: (1) “Introduction: The Growth of Wilderness Seeds” by Michael P. Nelson

and J. Baird Callicott, (2) “Animal Life as an Asset of National Parks” by Joseph Grinnell and

Tracy I. Storer, (3) “The Need for a More Serious Effort to Rescue a Few Fragments of

Vanishing Nature” by Francis B. Sumner, (4) “Importance of Natural Conditions in National

Parks” by Barrington Moore, (5) “The Importance of Preserving Wilderness Conditions” by

Charles C. Adams, (6) “Problem of Geographic Origin” by George M. Wright, Joseph S. Dixon,

and Ben H. Thompson, (7) “Big Game of Our National Parks” by George M. Wright, (8) “The

Preservation of Natural Biotic Communities” by Victor E. Shelford, (9) “Conservation versus

Preservation” by Victor E. Shelford, (10) “Wilderness as a Land Laboratory” by Aldo Leopold,

(11) “Science, Recreation, and Leopold’s Quest for a Durable Scale” by Julianne Lutz Warren,

(12) “The Value of Wilderness to Science” by Stephen H. Spurr, (13) “From Woodcraft to

‘Leave no Trace’: Wilderness, Consumerism, and Environmentalism in Twentieth-Century

America” by James Morton Turner, (14) “Wilderness Preservation Argument 31: The

Psychotherapy at a Distance Argument” by Mark Jenkins, (15) “Imaging Nature and Erasing

Class and Race: Carleton Watkin, John Muir, and the Construction of Wilderness” by Kevin

DeLuca and Anne Demo, (16) “Jackfish Pete: Pete LaPrarie’s Story” by Lynn Maria Laitala,

(17) “Wilderness Preservation and Biodiversity Conservation: Keeping Divergent Goals

Distinct” by Sahortra Sarkar, (18) “Cross-Cultural Confusion: Application of World Heritage

Concepts in Scenic and Historic Interest Areas in China” by Feng Han, (19) “Recycled Rain

Forest Myths” by Antonio Carlos Diegues, (20) “A Willing Benefactor: An Essay on Wilderness

in Nilotic and Bantu Culture” by G.W. Burnett, Regine Joulié-Küttner, and Kamuyu Wa

Kang’ethe, (21) “What is Africa to Me? Wilderness in Black Thought, 1860—1930” by

Kimberly K. Smith, (22) “African-American Wildland Memories” by Cassandra Y. Johnson and

Received Wilderness Idea” by J. Baird Callicott, (25) “The Real Wilderness Idea” by Dave

Foreman, (26) “Changing Human Relationships with Nature: Making and Remaking Wilderness

Science” by Jill M. Belsky, (27) “The Not-So-Great Wilderness Debate…Continued” by David

W. Orr, (28) “On Wilderness and People: A View from Mount Marcy” by Wayne Ouderkirk,

(29) “Something Wild? Deleuze and Guattari, Wilderness, and Purity” by Jonathan Maskit, (30)

“Wild: Rhythm of the Appearing and Disappearing” by Irene J. Klaver, (31) “Against the Social

Construction of Nature and Wilderness” by Eileen Crist, (32) “Wilderness, Cultivation and

Appropriation” by John O’Neill, (33) “Conservation Biologists Challenge Traditional Nature

Protection Organizations” by Michael McCloskey, (34) “Wilderness” by Marilynne Robinson,

(35) “The Implication of the ‘Shifting Paradigm’ in Ecology for Paradigm Shifts in the

Philosophy of Conservation” by J. Baird Callicott, (36) “Hell, No. Of Course Not. But…” by

Wendell Berry, (37) “Wilderness as a Sabbath for the Land” by Scott Russell Sanders, (38)

“Distinguishing Experiential and Physical Conceptions of Wilderness” by John A. Vucetich and

Michael P. Nelson, (39) “The Riddle of the Apostle Islands: How Do You Manage a Wilderness

Full of Human Stories?” by William Cronon, (40) “Letting Nature Run Wild in the National

Parks” by Rolf O. Peterson, (41) “Ecological Theory and Values in the Determination of

Conservation Goals: Examples from Temperate Regions of Germany, United States of America,

and Chile” by Kurt Jax and Ricardo Rozzi, and (42) “Wilderness as Witness (Cape Perpetua)” by

Kathleen Dean Moore.


Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion Volume 8, nos. 2/3 (2004). The topic of this

special issue is “Teaching Environmental Ethics.” Contents include: (1) “Introduction to

Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion Special Issue on Teaching Environmental Ethics”

by Clare Palmer (pp. 151-61), (2) “Transforming the ‘Market-Model University’: Environmental

Philosophy, Citizenship and the Recovery of the Humanities” by Dane Scott (pp. 162-84), (3)

“Environmental Education and Metaethics” by Owen Goldin (pp. 185-97), (4) “Can You Teach

Environmental Philosophy Without Being an Environmentalist?” by Kevin De LaPlante (pp.

198-212), (5) “Reducing Pessimism’s Sway in the Environmental Ethics Classroom” by James

W. Sheppard (pp. 213-26), (6) “Why Teach Environmental Ethics? Because We Already Do” by

Raymond Benton Jr. and Christine S. Benton (pp. 227-42), (7) “A Pragmatic, Co-operative

Approach to Teaching Environmental Ethics” by Daniel F. Shapiro and David Takacs (pp. 243-

66), (8) “A Being of Value: Educating for Environmental Advocacy” by Lisa Newton (pp. 267-

79), (9) “Walking the Talk: Philosophy of Conservation on the Isle of Rum” by Emily Brady,

Alan Holland, and Kate Rawles (pp. 280-97), (10) “From Delight to Wisdom: Thirty Years of

Teaching Environmental Ethics at Cornell” by Richard A. Baer Jr., James A. Tantillo, Gregory

E. Hitzhusen, Karl E. Johnson, and James R. Skillen (pp. 298-322), (11) “Teaching

Environmental Ethics: Non-indigenous Species as a Study of Human Relationships to Nature” by

Dorothy Boorse (pp. 323-35), (12) “Environmental Ethics from an Interdisciplinary Perspective:

The Marquette Experience” by Jame Schaefer (pp. 336-52), (13) “Teaching the Land Ethic” by

Michael P. Nelson (pp. 353-65), (14) “Place and Personal Commitment in Teaching

Environmental Ethics” by Philip Cafaro (pp. 366-76), (15) “Earth 101” by Roger S. Gottlieb (pp.

377-93), and (16) “Teaching Environmental Ethics to Non-specialist Students” by Hugh Mason

(pp. 394-400).


“Social History, Religion, and Technology: An Interdisciplinary Investigation into Lynn

White, Jr.s’ ‘Roots’” by Robin Attfield (pp. 31-50). Environmental Ethics

 Volume 21, no. 1 (Spring 2009):



“Responsibility for the End of Nature: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love

Global Warming” by Allen Thompson (pp. 79-99). Ethics and the Environment Volume 14, no. 1 (Spring 2009):


Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics. Volume 22, no. 1 (February 2009): “Ethical Responsibilities Towards Dogs: An Inquiry into the Dog-Human Relationship” by Kristien Hens (pp. 3-14).



Aaron Simmons, Animals, Predators, the right to life and the duty to save lives, Ethics and the Environment vol 14, 1 Spring 2009.


 James Gustave Speth The Bridge at the Edge of the World Capitalism, the Environment, and Crossing from Crisis to Sustainability Yale 2007 or 08?


Environment: An Interdisciplinary Anthology Selected, Edited, and with Introductions by Glenn Adelson, James Engell, Brent Ranalli, and K. P. Van Anglen Yale 2008?


Alan Carter, 'Animals, pain and morality', The Journal of Applied Philosophy 22, 1 (2005) (I have electronic copy)


Michael Sandel’s The Case Against Perfection Harvard University Press, 2007


Reiss and Straughan’s Improving Nature Cambridge University Press, 1996


J. Harris’s Enhancing Evolution Princeton University Press, 2007


Elizabeth Fenton’s Genetic Enhancement: A Threat to Human Rights? Bioethics 22 2008


Stephen Kellert et al., Biophilic Design: The Theory, Science and Practice of Bringing Buildings to Life 2008.


J. Wines, Green Architecture Koln: Taschen, 2000.


Terry Diffey, “Arguing about the Environment,” British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2000): 133-148

Thomas Leddy, “A defense of Arts-based Appreciation of Nature” Environmental Ethics 27 (2005) 200-315.


Gordon Orians dnd Heerwagen, “An Ecological and Evolutionary Approach to Landscape Aes,” in Edmund c. Pennning-Rowsell, eds. Landscape meanings and values, 1986)

            Also by them: Humans, habitats and Aesthetics” in Kellert and Wilson, eds., The Biophilia Hypothesis (Island press, 1993)


Terry Daniel, “Wither Scenic Beauty? Visual Landscape Qaulity Assessment in 21st Century,” Landscape and Urban Planning 54 (2001) 276-281.



Marcia Eaton, Aesthetics and the Good life, 1989, chr 4 and 5 and her “The role of Aesthetics in Designing Sustainable Landscapes” in Sepanmaa, ed., Real World Design 1977


Allen Carlson, “whose vision? Whose Meanings? Whose Values? Pluralism and Objectivity in Landscape analysis,” in Paul Groth, ed., Vision, Culture, and Landscape (Berkeley 1990) 157-168)


Allen Carlson, “ Aesthetic Preferences for Sustainable Landscapes: Seeing and Knowing,” in sheppart and Harshaw, eds., Forests and Landscapes 31-41.


Jay Appleton, “Landscape Evaluation: The Theoretical Vacuum,” Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 66 (1975)


Allen Carlson, “Recent Landscape Assessment Research,” Encyclopedia of Aesthetics in M. Kelly ed., V. 3, 1-2-105 (Oxford, 1998) includes a nice bibliography


Arnold Berleant, “On Judging Scenic Beauty,” in Aesthetic Culture e. S. Knuutila et al., Helsinki: Maahenki, 2005) pp. 57-75




Landscape assessment readings June 30, 2009


Landscape Aesthetics: a Handbook for Scenery Management published jointly by th U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Forest Service (Agriculture Handbook No. 701) from Ron Moore.


Allen, Carlson, "On the Theoretical Vacuum in Landscape Assessment," in Landscape Journal 2 (1993)


Allen, Carlson, "On the Possibility of Quantifying Scenic Beauty," in Landscape Planning V..
4 (1977)


Allen Carlson, “On the Possibility of Quantifying Scenic Beauty: A Response to Ribe,” Landscape Planning 11 (1984): 49-65.


Carlson, Allen, "Formal Qualities in the Natural Environment," Journal of Aesthetic Education

13(1979):99-114.


Allen Carlson, “Recent Landscape Assessment Research,” Encyclopedia of Aesthetics in M. Kelly ed., V. 3, 1-2-105 (Oxford, 1998) includes a nice bibliography


Allen Carlson, “Whose vision? Whose Meanings? Whose Values? Pluralism and Objectivity in Landscape analysis,” in Paul Groth, ed., Vision, Culture, and Landscape (Berkeley 1990) 157-168)


Allen Carlson, “ Aesthetic Preferences for Sustainable Landscapes: Seeing and Knowing,” in Sheppart and Harshaw, eds., Forests and Landscapes 31-41.


Arnold Berleant, “On Judging Scenic Beauty,” in Aesthetic Culture e. S. Knuutila et al., Helsinki: Maahenki, 2005) pp. 57-75

Daniel, C. T., 2001, “Whither Scenic Beauty? Visual Landscape Quality Assessment in the 21st Century”, Landscape and Urban Planning, 54: 276-281


Zube, E. H., 1984, “Themes in Landscape Assessment Theory”, Landscape Journal, 3: 104-11


Ervin Zube Landscape Assessment: Values, Perceptions, and Resources (1975)


Nasar, Jack L., ed. Environmental Aesthetics: Theory, Research, and Application. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.


Marcia Eaton, Aesthetics and the Good life, 1989, chr 4 and 5 M. Eaton, “Applied Aesthetics”and “Measuring What Matters (from Aesthetics and the Good Life)

and her “The Role of Aesthetics in Designing Sustainable Landscapes” in Sepanmaa, ed., Real World Design 1977


Jay Appleton, “Landscape Evaluation: The Theoretical Vacuum,” Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 66 (1975)


Landscape Aesthetics: a Handbook for Scenery Management published jointly by th U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Forest Service (Agriculture Handbook No. 701), December 1995


M. Ridout, “Scenic-Beauty Issues in Public Policy Making.” in Environmental Aesthetics: Theory, Research, and Application Edited by Jack L. Nasar Cambridge 1992



Environmental Aesthetics: Theory, Research, and Application Edited by Jack L. Nasar Cambridge 1992


How do people react to the visual character of their surroundings? What can planners do to improve the aesthetic quality of these surroundings? Too often in environmental design, visual quality--aesthetics--is misunderstood as only a minor concern, dependent on volatile taste and thus undefinable. Yet a substantial body of research indicates the importance of visual quality in the environment to the public and has uncovered systematic patterns of human response to visual attributes of the built environment. Efforts to understand environmental aesthetics have been undertaken by investigators from such diverse fields as landscape architecture, environmental psychology, geography, philosophy, architecture, and city planning. As a result the relevant information is scattered and not readily available to professionals and policy makers. The book brings together classic and new contributions by distinguished workers in different disciplines. It explores theory and data on preferences in the visual environment, and also addresses the practical application of aesthetic criteria in design, planning and public policy. Promising directions for future research are identified.

Contents


Section I. Theory: Editor's introduction; 1. Behavioral and perceptual aspects of the aesthetics of urban environments Tom F. Heath; 2. Symbolic aesthetics in architecture: toward a research agenda Jon Lang; 3. Prospects and refuges revisited Jay Appleton; 4. Perception and landscape: conceptions and misconceptions Stephen Kaplan; 5. Where cognition and affect meet: a theoretical analysis of preference Stephen Kaplan; 6. The landscape of social symbols Barrie B. Greenbie; 7. Open space in cities: in search of a new aesthetic Werner Nohl; 8. Aesthetic perception in environmental design Arnold Berleant; Section II. Empirical studies: Editor's introduction; A. Methodological comments: Editor's introduction; 9. The assessment of landscape quality: an integrative approach D. Mark Fenton and Joseph P. Reser; 10. Affective appraisals of environments James A. Russell; B. Architectural interiors: Editor's introduction; 11. The influence of a beautiful versus an ugly room on ratings of photographs of human faces: a replication of Maslow and Mintz Richard M. Locasso; 12. The development of a usable lexicon of environmental descriptors Joyce Vielhauer Kasmar; 13. Lighting-design decisions as interventions in human visual space John E. Flynn; C. Architectural exteriors: Editor's introduction; 14. A study of meaning and architecture Robert G. Hershberger; 15. Predicting user responses to buildings Robert G. Hershberger and Robert C. Cass; 16. Dimensions in the perception of architecture: identification and interpretation of dimensions of similarity Anke Oostendorp and Daniel E. Berlyne; 17. Contextual compatibility in architecture: an issue of personal taste? Linda N. Groat; D. Urban scenes: Editor's introduction; 18. Visual preferences in urban street scenes: a cross-cultural comparison between Japan and the United States Jack L. Nasar; 19. Perception and evaluation of residential street scenes Jack L. Nasar; 20. Planning concerns relating to urban nature settings: the role of size and other physical features Janet F. Talbot; 21. The effect of sign complexity and coherence on the perceived quality of retail scenes Jack L. Nasar; E. Natural and rural scenes: Editor's introduction; 22. Dimensions of meaning in the perception of natural settings and their relationship to aesthetic response D. Mark Fenton; 23. A cognitive analysis of preference for field-and-forest environments Thomas R. Herzog; 24. The emotional quality of scenes and observation points: a look at prospect and refuge Jack L. Nasar, David Julian, Sarah Buchman, David Humphreys, and Marianne Mrohaly; 25. Aesthetic preference for rural landscapes: some resident and visitor differences Brian Orland; 26. Familiarity and preference: a cross-cultural analysis Rachel Kaplan and Eugene J. Herbert; Section III. Applications: Editor's introduction; 27. Visual needs in urban environments and physical planning Eduardo E. Lozano; 28. A survey of aesthetic controls in English-speaking countries Wolfgang F. E. Preiser and Kevin P. Rohane; 29. Scenic-beauty issues in public policy making Mollie Ridout; 30. Coping with aesthetics and community design in rural communities Fred A. Hurand; 31. Toward theory generation in landscape aesthetics Fahriye Hazer Sancar; 32. Aesthetic regulation and the courts Kenneth T. Pearlman.







Ronald Hepburn on Christianity and aesthetics: “Aesthetic and Religious: Boundaries, Overlaps, and Intrusions,” in Sepanmaa, Real World Design 42-48 and “Restoring the Sacred: Sacred as a Cocept of Aesthetics” in Pauline von Bonsdorff and Haapala eds., Aesthetics in the Human EnvrionmentI Finland, 1999


Arnold Berleant, “The Critical Aesthetics of Disney world, “ Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (1994): 171-180.


Kevin Melchionne, “Living in Glass Houses: Domesticity , interior Decoration, and Environmental Aesthetics,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (1998): 191-200 and “front yards” in Berleant ed. Environment and the Arts 192-111.


Glenn Parsons and Allen Carlson, Functional Beauty (Oxford, 2009), includes a chapter on nature and environment.


Aesthetics and Nature (Continuum Aesthetics) by Glenn Parsons (2008)


Philosophy of Gardens, David E. Cooper (Oxford, 2008)


Donlan, c. Josh et al, “Rewilding North Aerica, Nature 436: 913-12 2005

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v436/n7053/full/436913a.html



Humberto Rosa, 2004, Bioethics of Biodiversity in Charles Susanne, guest ed., “Societal Responsibilities in Life Sciences” Human Ecology Review Special issues3/12: 157-71.


Bruce N. Waller The natural selection of autonomy (Albany, N.Y. : State University of New York Press, c1998)


Marc Bekoff and Jessica Pierce, Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals (Chicago:

University of Chicago Press, 2009) 208 pages, 8 halftones 6 x 9 © 2009 Cloth $26.00 ISBN: 9780226041612 Pre-order now. Will publish May 2009


Hursthouse, R., 2000, Ethics, Humans and Other Animals, London: Routledge.


Fred Singer, an atmospheric physicist, is president of the Science and Environmental Policy Project <http://www.sepp.org/> and professor emeritus of environmental sciences at the University of Virginia. He also served as the founding director of the U.S. Weather Satellite Service. His latest book is "Unstoppable Global Warming - Every 1,500 Years" (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007).


Paul M. Keeling, “Does the Idea of wilderness Need a Defence?” Environmental Values 17, 4 2008


Dan Firth, “The Role of Aesthetic Considerations in a Narrative Based Approach to Nature Conservation,” Ethics and Environment 13,2 2008 p


Hi, please be advised of the recent publication of Volume 4, No. 2 of Green

Theory & Praxis: The Journal of Ecopedagogy (ISSN 1941-0948 / DOI:

10.3903/gtp). This peer-reviewed journal is dedicated to research at the

transformative nexus of ecological politics and culture, critical theory and

sustainability education. We are always looking for essays, reviews and

other materials. Visit our homepage: http://greentheoryandpraxis.org/.


The current issue is online at: http://greentheoryandpraxis.ecopedagogy.org/index.php/journal/issue/current


Table of Contents

Introduction

Richard Kahn pp. i-ii

Articles


Why the George Lakoff and Mark Johnson Theory of Metaphor is Inadequate for

Addressing Cultural Issues Related to the Ecological Crises

C. A. Bowers pp. 1-10


Toward an Ecopedagogy of Children's Environmental Literature

Greta Gaard pp. 11-24


Just War and Warrior Activists


Lisa Kemmerer pp. 25-49


Understanding the Ideology of the Earth Liberation Front

Sean Parson pp. 50-66


Being Sentient and Sentient Being: The Animal Rights Movement and

Interspecies Boundaries

John C. Alessio pp. 67-86


Capitalist Discipline and Ecological Discipline

Samuel Day Fassbinder pp. 87-101


Aesthetics and Morality Elisabeth Schellekens Pub Date: 15 Jan 2008 Continum press


This site offers some help on philosophy of food: http://www.food.unt.edu


Delind, Laura B. "Of Bodies, Place, and Culture: Resituating Local Food." Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19.2 (2006): 121-146.


# Lapping, Mark B. “Toward the Recovery of the Local in the Globalizing Food System: The Role of Alternative Agricultural and Food Models in the Us.” Ethics, Place and Environment 7.3 (2005): 141-50.


Davis, Steven L. “The Least Harm Principle May Require That Humans Consume a Diet Containing Large Herbivores, Not a Vegan Diet.” Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16.4 (July 2003): 387-94.


Perry, Clifton. “We Are What We Eat.” Environmental Ethics 3.4 (1981): 341-50.


films about food

Here are five recent and entertaining films about food that might be appropriate:

Darwins Nightmare,
Super Size Me
Our Daily Bread
,
The Real Dirt on Farmer John,
King Corn


"The future of food" directed by Deborah Koons

"Meat the Truth" put out by the Nicolaas Pierson Foundation in Holland.



 Christopher B. Field Enhanced: Sharing the Garden Science 21 December 2001: Vol. 294. no. 5551, pp. 2490 - 2491 (on how much net primary productivity humans usurp) http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/294/5551/2490


Performance-Enhancing Technologies and the Values of Athletic Competition

David Wasserman Philosophy & Public Policy Quarterly Volume 28, Number 3/4, Summer/Fall 2008 What would be objectionable about sports doping if it were safe and legal? Some ethicists have

justified their qualms about doping by invoking elusive distinctions between the natural and the

artificial. But the harm in doping and other biotechnological enhancements is best understood in

terms of the values of athletic competition—specifically, the spectators' identification with the

performers, and the continuity and comparability of athletic achievement over time. Instead of

endorsing categorical bans on specific enhancements, David Wasserman recommends caution

informed by a clear perception of the values at stake. http://www.publicpolicy.umd.edu/IPPP/quarterly.html



Environmental Virtue Ethics


Philip Cafaro, “Glutton, Arrogance, Greed, and Apathy: An Exploration of Environmental Vice” in Ronald Sandler and Phil Cafaro, Environmental Virtue Ethics (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005)


Louke van Wensveen, “The Emergence of Ecological Virtue Language,” Ch. 1 of Wensveen’s dirty Virtues: The Emergence of Ecological Virtue Ethics (Humanity books, 2000)


Rosalind Hursthouse, “Environmental Virtue Ethics,” in Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems, ed. by Rebecca L. Walker and Philip J. Ivanhoe (Oxford, 2007)



Steve Gardiner,'Ethics and Global Climate Change', Ethics 114, April 2004, 555-600. (Reprinted in Louis Pojman and Paul Pojman, eds. Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Practice. Wadsworth, 5th edition. 2007.)


Steve Gardiner, 'A Perfect Moral Storm: Climate Change, Intergenerational Ethics and the Problem of Moral Corruption', Environmental Values 15. August 2006, 397-413. Commentary by Peter Singer.



Dale Jamieson, Ethics and the Environment: An Introduction (Cambridge, 2008)


J. Baird Callicott, selected articles: “The Land Ethic” in Dale Jamieson, ed., Companion to Environmental Philosophy (Blackwell 2001) and “What ‘Wilderness’ in Frontier Ecosystems?” Environmental Ethics 30 (Fall 2008); "Should Endangered Species Have Standing?: Toward Legal Rights for Listed Species" forthcoming in Philosophy and Public Policy (with William Grove-Fanning); “My Reply” in Wayne Ouderkirk and Jim Hill, eds., Land, Value, Community: Callicott and Environmental Philosophy (SUNY 2002).


Allen Carlson, Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics (Columbia, 2009).



Ned Hettinger, “Evaluating Positive Aesthetics” (draft) and “Animal Beauty, Ethics, and Environmental Preservation” (draft)


Booth, Annie L. "Does the Spirit Move You? Environmental Spirituality." Environmental Values 8(1999):89-105. ABSTRACT: This article looks at the idea of spirituality as it is discussed within ecophilosophical circles, particularly ecofeminism, bioregionalism, and deep ecology, as a means to improve human-nature interactions. The article also examines the use each ecophilosophy makes of a popular alternative to mainstream religion, that of Native American spiritualities, and problems inherent in adapting that alternative. KEYWORDS: Spirituality, ecospirituality, deep ecology, ecofeminism, bioregionalism, ecophilosophy. Annie L. Booth, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies University of Northern British Columbia 3333 University Way Prince George, British Columbia V2N 4Z9, Canada. (EV)


Holmes Rolston, "Environmental Ethics and Religion/Science." Pages 908-928 in Philip Clayton and Zachary Simpson, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006). Download/Print in PDF format, 1.1 mb.

http://lamar.colostate.edu/~rolston/EE-Sci-Rel.pdf


Brennan, Andrew, "Poverty, Puritanism and Environmental Conflict," Environmental Values 7(1998): 305-331. The paper proposes two ideas: (1) The wilderness preservation movement has failed to identify key elements involved in situations of environmental conflict. (2) The same movement seems unaware of its location within a tradition which is both elitist and Puritan. Holmes Rolston's recent work on the apparent conflict between feeding people and saving nature appears to exemplify the two points. With respect to point (1), Rolston's treatment fails to address the institutional and structural features which set the agenda for individual human lives. The human ecology of environmental destruction cannot ignore the role of corporate actors such as banks, national governments, transnational corporations, trade unions and so on. These agents interact with each other in various ways and also have an internal structure - perhaps akin to Arthur Koestler's conception of the holarchy - which enables people working within them to avoid taking responsibility for policies that have damaging environmental consequences. As far as thesis (2) is concerned, Rolston's work shares common features with Arne Naess's deep ecology and Aldo Leopold's land ethic. All of these writers draw, perhaps unconsciously, on a tradition of sporting elitism associated with the Great White Hunter. One variety of this tradition combines elitism with a form of Puritanism. KEYWORDS: environmental conflict, Puritanism, poverty, elitism, human ecology, Rolston. Andrew Brennan is at The University of Western Australia. Perth. (EV)


GomezPompa (G—mez-Pompa), Arturo and Andrea Kaus, "Taming the Wilderness Myth," BioScience 42 (no. 4, April 1992):271-279. "Environmental policy and education are currently based on Western beliefs about nature rather than on reality." "The perspectives of the rural populations are missing in our concept of conservation. Many environmental education programs are strongly biased by elitist urban perceptions of the urban world. This approach is incomplete and insufficient to deal with the complex context of conservation efforts and home and abroad. It neglects the perceptions and experience of the rural populations, the people most closely linked to the land, who have a firsthand understanding of their surrounding natural environment as teacher and provider." "Until we understand that the tropical forests are `both artifact and habitat,' we will be advocating policies for a mythical pristine environment that exists only in our imagination." The authors argue that, especially in Mexico and the Amazon, the pre-European landscape was already managed intensively by the indigenous peoples and that there was no undisturbed wilderness. G—mez-Pompa is professor of botany at the University of California Consortium on Mexico and Kaus is a graduate student in anthropology at the University of California, Riverside. (v3,#3)


Passmore, John, "The Preservationist Syndrome," Journal of Political Philosophy 3(#1, 1995):1-22. Passmore wishes more consistent use of "conservation" and "preservation." Conservation is future-oriented; preservation is past-oriented. In the rapidly changing modern world, the rise of preservationist interests is striking. Passmore considers urban preservation, ecological preservation, cultural preservation, versus development, the question of "rights" to development, indigenous "rights" to traditional lands, "rights" of animals to be preserved, "rights" of species, whether to say that preservation is "better" is culturally relative, whether preservationists are elitists. The paper, he notes, is a development and generalization of Chapters IV and V in his Man's Responsibility for Nature (London: Duckworth, 1980). Passmore is retired, Australian National University, Canberra. He will speak at the forthcoming World Congress of Philosophy, Boston, August 1997. (v8,#3)


Sandler, Ronald, and Phaedra C. Pezzullo, eds. Environmental Justice and Environmentalism: The Social Justice Challenge to the Environmental Movement. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007. In our library GE220 .E578 2007 Although the environmental movement and the environmental justice movement would seem to be natural allies, their relationship over the years has often been characterized by conflict and division. The environmental justice movement has charged the mainstream environmental movement with racism and elitism and has criticized its activist agenda on the grounds that it values wilderness over people. Environmental justice advocates have called upon environmental organizations to act on environmental injustice and address racism and classism in their own hiring and organizational practices, lobbying agenda, and political platforms. This book examines the current relationship between the two movements in both conceptual and practical terms and explores the possibilities for future collaboration.  


KALAM


Traversal of the Infinite, the 'Big Bang,' and the 'Kalam' Cosmological Argument By: Oderberg, David S. Philosophia Christi, 4(2), 303-334, 32 p. SERIES 2: 2002 Debate over the 'Kalam cosmological argument' (KCA) has flourished in recent years due to the impressive work of William Lane Craig. The basic argument--the the universe has a cause (viz. God) because the universe began to exist and whatever begins to exist has a cause of its beginning to exist--has excited vigorous criticism on various fronts. The aim of this paper is twofold: (a) to survey and evaluate that aspect of the KCA which relies on the claim that the universe as actual infinite cannot be formed by successive addition (i.e., cannot be 'traversed'); (b) to survey and evaluate that aspect of the argument which relies on the claim that whatever begins to exist must have a cause of the beginning of its existence. I canvass and refute criticisms of both claims, providing positive arguments to show that the claims are true. On both scores, then, the KCA stands unrefuted.



HUMANISM


Paul Kurtz “First Things First: Toward a Minimalistic Definition of Humanism” - Philo Vol. 1, no. 1 Spring-Summer, 1998


A Secular Humanist: Setting the Record Straight: Definition By: Flynn, Thomas W. Free Inquiry, 22(4), 35-43, 9 p. FALL 2002.\



'Religious Humanism' and the Dangers of Semantic Distortion By: Pasquale, Frank L. Free Inquiry, 22(4), 44-47, 4 p. FALL 2002.


Pragmatic Humanism By: Robbins, J Wesley. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy, 23(2), 173-191, 19 p. May 2002. (AN PHL1699590)


Naturalism and Religion: Must Naturalistic Explanations Explain Religion Away? - Kai Nielsen Philo Vol. 1, no. 1 Spring-Summer, 1998


A Challenge for Naturalism: Humanists Need a Ready Answer By: D'Agostino, S Matthew. Free Inquiry, 22(1), 38-41, 4 p. Winter 2001-2002.


Religious Naturalism or Theological Humanism? By: Klemm, David E. Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science, 42(2), 357-367, 11 p. June 2007. Abstract Available (AN PHL2104943)


Atheistic Humanism By: Flew, Antony. Buffalo: Prometheus. 1993.


On Atheist Humanism By: Nielsen, Kai. International Studies in Philosophy, 31(4), 67-81, 15 p. 1999.

Religious Naturalism: Humanistic Versus Theistic By: Robbins, J Wesley. Pragmatism, Neo-Pragmatism, and Religion. New York: Lang. 1997.


In Defense of Secular Humanism By: Grunbaum, Adolf. Free Inquiry, 12(4), 30-39, 10 p. FALL 1992.


The Challenge of Secular Humanism to Christianity By: Robertson, Jr, John C. Journal of Dharma, 20(4), 352-367, 16 p. October-December 1995


Let's Learn Religion from...Flowers By: Cieniawa, Stanislaw. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism (A Journal of the American Humanist Association), 14, 69-77, 9 p. 2006.


Humanism: An Introduction By: Herrick, Jim. Amherst: Prometheus Books. 2005.


.

Humanistic Values By: Adams, Maynard. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, 54(2), 65-76, 12 p. October 2003.


END HUMANISM


References


Budd, Malcolm 2002. The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature: Essays on the Aesthetics of Nature (New York: Oxford University Press).


Carlson, Allen, 2000. Aesthetics and the Environment (New York: Routledge).


Carlson, Allen, 2007. "‘We see beauty now where we could not see it before’: Rolston’s Aesthetics of Nature,” in Christopher Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk, eds., Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III (Springer).


Carroll, Noel, 2000. “Art and Ethical Criticism: An Overview of Recent Directions of Research,” Ethics 110: 350-87.


Fudge, Robert, 2001. “Imagination and the Science-based Aesthetic Appreciation of Unscenic Nature,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59: 275-285.


Korsmeyer, Carolyn, 2005. “Terrible Beauties,” in Matthew Kieran, ed., Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (Malden, MA: Blackwell), pp. 51-64.


Leopold, Aldo. 1966. A Sand County Almanac with other Essays on Conservation from Round River (New York: Oxford University Press).


Loftis, J. Robert, 2003. “Three Problems for the Aesthetic Foundations of Environmental Ethics,” Philosophy in the Contemporary World 10, 2: 41-50.


Parsons, Glenn, 2006. “Freedom and Objectivity in the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature, British Journal of Aesthetics 46, 1: 17-37.


Rachels, James, 1978. “What People Deserve,” in John Arthur and William H. Shaw, eds., Justice and Economic Distribution (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall), pp. 150-163.


Rolston, Homes, III, 1986. Philosophy Gone Wild (Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books).


Rolston, Holmes, III, 1987. “Beauty and the Beast: Aesthetic Experience of Wildlife,” in Daniel J. Decker and Gary R. Goff, eds., Valuing Wildlife: Economic and Social Perspectives (Boulder, CO: Westview Press), pp. 187-196.


Rolston, Holmes, III, 1992. “Disvalues in Nature,” in J. Baird Callicott and Barry Smith, eds., "The Intrinsic Value of Nature," The Monist 75: 250-278.


Rolston, Homes, III 2002. “From Beauty to Duty: Aesthetics of Nature and Environmental Ethics," in Arnold Berleant, ed., Environment and the Arts: Perspectives on Environmental Aesthetics (Burlington, VT: Ashgate), pp. 127-141.


Saito, Yuriko, 1998. “The Aesthetics of Unscenic Nature,” in A. Berleant and A. Carlson, eds., Special Issue: Environmental Aesthetics, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56: 102-111.


Walton, Kendall (2002), “Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality,” in Alex Neill and Aaron Ridley, eds., Arguing About Art, 2nd ed. (New York: Routledge).






Sven Arntzen and Emily Brady Humans in the Land Oslo Academic press 2008.


Positive and negative rights


On positive-negative rights, see the Sagoff paper we read. Also: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rights/ section on 2.1.8 Negative and Positive Rights


Stephen Gardner, 'Saved by Disaster? Abrupt Climate Change and the Possibility of an Intergenerational Arms Race'. http://faculty.washington.edu/smgard/GardinerSavedDRAFT.pdf



James Gustave Speth's The Bridge at the Edge of the World: Capitalism, the Environment, and Crossing From Crisis to Sustainability (Yale).


Jeremy Jeremy Bendik-Keymer recommendations on Aesthetics and env?

Elaine Scarry, On Beauty and Being Just Princeton University pres 1999 (Scarry is at Harvard)

Lauren Tillinghast, Objectivity

Ann Eaton, Ethics and the Aesthetician

Ann Eaton, “Where Ethics and Aesthetics Meet,” Hypatia (winter 2003_


Austrian director Nikolaus Geyrhalter's Our Daily Bread,

           a nonfiction look at food preparation that reads more like an art-house experiment than a documentary. Exquisitely lensed in 35mm and Hi-Def digital by Geyrhalter, this eccentrically lovely and frequently horrifying film presents a series of minimalist tableaus from within farms, fields, salt mines, and packing plants to show naked truths about how we get our eats. "Heifer whines could be human cries," or so sang the Smiths, but this isn't merely about the food chain and those living things that must be destroyed so we may subsist. Gory blips of slaughterhouse footage are less explicitly shocking here than in Georges Franju's notorious short Blood of the Beasts, Barbet Schroeder's Maîtresse, or even fellow NYFF selection Insiang, whose very first shot is a pig dissection in close-up. This is more about the mechanical indifference to this necessary job (such as the aproned drone who casually chats on his cell phone out of earshot while a hanging cow's skin is messily shed behind him), where animals look like caged men, human workers have the demeanor of mindless robots, and stainless steel instruments seem almost organic and alive. But is that what it's really about? The film's ultimate strength and weakness are the very same, which is that Geyrhalter refuses to editorialize his findings nor subtitle the workers' probably banal discourse (barely audible, their words may as well be the muted trumpetings of Charlie Brown's teachers), outwardly stating in the film's synopsis that the intention is to let viewers draw their own conclusions. It's a brilliant concept and a bit of a cop-out, considering how much control he and editor Wolfgang Widerhofer show by contrasting sequences against one another chronologically, or depicting a factory worker methodically chewing her lunchtime morsels. Some will find a strange splendor in the cold technology that indirectly keeps us warm, others won't see the point without a conscious message, and still more will be outraged by seeing chirping baby chicks shot out of an engine like a fastball at the batting cages. This critic found much to digest (pun barely intended), with thoughts of FDA politics and standard practices, the ritualism and sacrifice of our own species, why baby animals are considered protectable innocents (and inversely, grown steaks-to-be just a fact of life), plus, on a meta level, how people's dietary philosophies will inform their reactions to the work. Aesthetically speaking, anyone who can pan, track, and offer wide-lens symmetry this provocative (the best crop-duster image since North by Northwest; a conveyer belt of processed chickens that looks like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre as a Busby Berkeley chorus line) deserves to find an audience of hungry cinephiles. From : http://www.premiere.com/filmfestivals/3173/new-york-film-festival-update-4.html





http://www.storyofstuff.com/

Good on underside of overconsumption


http://everythingscool.org/index.php

Film about climate change recommended by Andrew Light



Impacts of Religion on Environmental Worldviews: The Teton Valley Case, Pages 704 - 718

Authors: M. Nils Peterson; Jianguo Liu in Society and Natural Resources

DOI: 10.1080/08941920802191852

Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0894-1920&volume=21&issue=8&spage=704&uno_jumptype=alert&uno_alerttype=new_issue_alert,email


The Ethics of Extension: Philosophical Speculation on Nonhuman Animals, Pages 157 - 180

Author: David Lulka in Ethics, Place and Environment

DOI: 10.1080/13668790802252330

Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1366-879X&volume=11&issue=2&spage=157&uno_jumptype=alert&uno_alerttype=new_issue_alert,email


How Should Animals Be Treated?, Pages 181 - 189 in Ethics, Place and Environment

Author: Jack Lee

DOI: 10.1080/13668790802252363

Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1366-879X&volume=11&issue=2&spage=181&uno_jumptype=alert&uno_alerttype=new_issue_alert,email




Virtue and Respect for Nature: Ronald Sandler's Character and Environment, Pages 213 - 235

Authors: Katie Mcshane; Allen Thompson; Ronald Sandler

in Ethics, Place and Environment DOI: 10.1080/13668790802252421

Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1366-879X&volume=11&issue=2&spage=213&uno_jumptype=alert&uno_alerttype=new_issue_alert,email


Dale Jamieson, 'sustainability and beyond', ch. 21 of my book, Morality's Progress (Oxford, 2002).


Film: KOYAANISQATSI or "life out of balance,”

at amazon: Koyaanisqatsi / Powaqqatsi (2 Pack) (1983)

First-time filmmaker Godfrey Reggio's experimental documentary from 1983--shot mostly in the desert Southwest and New York City on a tiny budget with no script, then attracting the support of Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas and enlisting the indispensable musical contribution of Philip Glass--delighted college students on the midnight circuit and fans of minimalism for many years.


James McAllister's "Beauty and Revolutions in Science." Cornell, 1999.


Future of Env. Philosophy, Ethics and Environment 12, 2 Fall 2007


Excellent picts of shore creatures

          http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.marietta.edu/~biol/biomes/images/shores/red_crab_2556.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.marietta.edu/~biol/biomes/sandy_shores.htm&h=332&w=500&sz=109&hl=en&start=3&sig2=waUkTEOA5ioYf6TflwXlUA&tbnid=j8VyFoYuZx4f4M:&tbnh=86&tbnw=130&ei=QAPoRoHyMpzwgALGz-yyBg&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dghost%2Bcrab%26gbv%3D2%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG


Ugly animal sites

          http://www.pbs.org/nights/blog/2007/11/nature_the_beauty_of_ugly.html

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/beautyofugly/


Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics, Allen Carlson

Paper, 192 pages, ISBN: 978-0-231-14041-6 $24.50 / £14.50 December, 2008 columbia univ press


ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS: TOWARD A MORALITY OF COEXISTENCE Edited by CHRISTEN WEMMER AND CATHERINE A. CHRISTEN FROM THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS 2008?


Foreword, by John Seidensticker / xi


Preface / xv


1. INTRODUCTION: NEVER FORGETTING THE IMPORTANCE OF ETHICAL TREATMENT OF

ELEPHANTS

Christen Wemmer and Catherine A. Christen


PART I. OVERVIEW OF ELEPHANT PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE


2. ELEPHANTS IN TIME AND SPACE: EVOLUTION AND ECOLOGY

Raman Sukumar


3. PERSONHOOD, MEMORY, AND ELEPHANT MANAGEMENT

Gary Varner


4. ELEPHANT SOCIALITY AND COMPLEXITY: THE SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

Joyce H. Poole and Cynthia J. Moss


5. ELEPHANTS, ETHICS, AND HISTORY

Nigel Rothfels


6. PAIN, STRESS, AND SUFFERING IN ELEPHANTS: WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE AND

HOW CAN WE MEASURE IT?

Janine L. Brown, Nadja Wielebnowski, and Jacob V. Cheeran


PART II. ELEPHANTS IN THE SERVICE OF PEOPLE: CULTURAL DIFFERENCES AND

ETHICAL RELATIVITY


7. ELEPHANTS AND PEOPLE IN INDIA: HISTORICAL PATTERNS OF CAPTURE AND

MANAGEMENT

Dhriti K. Lahiri Choudhury


8. CARROTS AND STICKS, PEOPLE AND ELEPHANTS: RANK, DOMINATION, AND TRAINING

John Lehnhardt and Marie Galloway


9. CANVAS TO CONCRETE: ELEPHANTS AND THE CIRCUS-ZOO RELATIONSHIP

Michael D. Kreger


10. WHY CIRCUSES ARE UNSUITED TO ELEPHANTS

Lori Alward


11. VIEW FROM THE BIG TOP: WHY ELEPHANTS BELONG IN NORTH AMERICAN CIRCUSES

Dennis Schmitt


12. THE CHALLENGES OF MEETING THE NEEDS OF CAPTIVE ELEPHANTS

Jane Garrison


13. MOST ZOOS DO NOT DESERVE ELEPHANTS

David Hancocks


14. ZOOS AS RESPONSIBLE STEWARDS OF ELEPHANTS

Michael Hutchins, Brandie Smith, and Mike Keele


15. CAN WE ASSESS THE NEEDS OF ELEPHANTS IN ZOOS? CAN WE MEET THE NEEDS

OF ELEPHANTS IN ZOOS?

Jill D. Mellen, Joseph C. E. Barber, and Gary W. Miller


16. GIANTS IN CHAINS: HISTORY, BIOLOGY, AND PRESERVATION OF ASIAN

ELEPHANTS IN CAPTIVITY

Fred Kurt, Khyne U Mar, and Marion E. Garaï


PART III. ELEPHANTS AND PEOPLE IN NATURE: THE ETHICS OF CONFLICTS AND

ACCOMMODATIONS


17. RESTORING INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN PEOPLE AND ELEPHANTS: A SRI LANKAN

CASE STUDY

Lalith Seneviratne and Greg D. Rossel


18. SUMATRAN ELEPHANTS IN CRISIS: TIME FOR CHANGE

Susan K. Mikota, Hank Hammatt, and Yudha Fahrimal


19. HUMAN-ELEPHANT CONFLICTS IN AFRICA: WHO HAS THE RIGHT OF WAY?

Winnie Kiiru


20. PLAYING ELEPHANT GOD: ETHICS OF MANAGING WILD AFRICAN ELEPHANT

POPULATIONS

Ian Whyte and Richard Fayrer-Hosken


21. TOWARD AN ETHIC OF INTIMACY: TOURING AND TROPHY HUNTING FOR

ELEPHANTS IN AFRICA

Rebecca Hardin


22. THE ETHICS OF GLOBAL ENFORCEMENT: ZIMBABWE AND THE POLITICS OF THE

IVORY TRADE

Rosaleen Duffy



Gill Aitken, “Animal Suffering; An Evolutionary Approach,” Environmental Values, 17,2 2008


Dale Jamieson, “The Rights of Animals and the Demands of Nature,” Environmental Values, 17,2 2008


John Benson, “Aesthetic and Other Values in the Rural Landscape,” Environmental Values, 17,2 2008


Holmes Rolston, “Mountain Majesties above Fruited Plains,” Environmental Ethics 30, 1 Spring 2008


Jason Simus, “Environmental Art and Ecological Citizenship,” Environmental Ethics 30, 1 Spring 2008



Helena Siipi, “Dimensions of Naturalness,” Ethics and the Environment 13,1 Spring 2008.


Charles Cockell, “Env. Ethics and size” Ethics and the Environment 13,1 Spring 2008.


Anders Schinkel, “Martha Nussbaum on Animal Rights Ethics and the Environment 13,1 Spring 2008.


The Wilderness Debate Rages On Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate Edited by Michael P. Nelson and J. Baird Callicott University of Georgia Press Oct 2008


Philip Alperson, ed., Musical worlds: new Directions in the Philosophy of Music (Penn State Press, 1994), includes John Fisher’s “Rock ‘n’ Recording: The Ontological Complexity of Rock Music” Cage and Philosophy by Noel Carroll, Levinson on Evaluating Music, “Can White People Sing the Blues: Race ethinicity and Expressive Authenticity”


Ethics, Place & Environment A Journal of Philosophy & Geography, Volume 11 Issue 1 2008. Includes Mr Walzer's Neighborhood: The Need for Geographic Particularity in Distributive Ethics, Pages 1 - 16 Author: Eric O. Jacobsen, absract: n Spheres of Justice, Michael Walzer articulates an approach to distributive ethics based on complex equality that is closely attentive to the specific ways particular communities value goods. A renewed interest in place and geography among practitioners and theoreticians is giving rise to questions that are beyond the scope of Walzer's system and reveal abstractions at the geographic level that undercut his overall approach. This internal inconsistency weakens, but does not ultimately discount, Walzer's overall system of distributive ethics. When calibrated to allow for geographic particularity, Walzer's approach becomes even more useful to critique a range of contemporary development movements.

 Failures of Imagination: Stuck and Out of Luck in the American Metropolis, Pages 17 - 32 Author: Robert Kirkman abstrace: Ethical choice and action in the built environment are complicated by the fact that moral agents often get stuck as they pursue their goals. A common way of getting stuck has its roots in human cognition: the failure of moral imagination, which shows most clearly when moral agents stand on either side of a sharp cultural divide, like the traditional divide between city and suburb. Being stuck is akin to bad moral luck: it is a situation beyond the control of the moral agent for which that agent might nevertheless be held responsible.; Biogeography and Evolutionary Emotivism, Pages 33 - 48 Author: Brian K. Steverson abstract: n Spheres of Justice, Michael Walzer articulates an approach to distributive ethics based on complex equality that is closely attentive to the specific ways particular communities value goods. A renewed interest in place and geography among practitioners and theoreticians is giving rise to questions that are beyond the scope of Walzer's system and reveal abstractions at the geographic level that undercut his overall approach. This internal inconsistency weakens, but does not ultimately discount, Walzer's overall system of distributive ethics. When calibrated to allow for geographic particularity, Walzer's approach becomes even more useful to critique a range of contemporary development movements.Exchange, Pages 49 - 90 Author: Brian K. Steverson

 Last Child in the Woods –– Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder



Environmental Aesthetics and Ecological Restoration Spring & Fall 2007 (Vol. 4, nos. 1 & 2) EDITORIAL PREFACE      Ted Toadvine The Requirements for An Adequate Aesthetics of Nature          Allen Carlson Performing Nature   John Andrew Fisher Off the Beaten Path: The Artworks of Andrew Goldsworthy       Nicolas de Warren hee Soft Side of Stone: Notes for a Phenomenology of Stone         Arnold Berleant Forest and Philosophy: Toward an Aesthetics of Wood (Available for free download as PDF file)     Galen A. Johnson

Sensing Environmentalism Anew: Gestate Witness of a More-than-Human World in Merleau-Ponty          James Hatley Art + Ecology: Land Reclamation Works of Artists Robert Smithson, Robert Morris, and Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison           Leslie Ryan Toronto’s Leslie Street Spit: Aesthetics and the Ecology of Marginal Land           Jennifer Foster Toward a Richer Account of Restorative Practices           Glenn Deliège Ecological Restoration, Aldo Leopold, and Beauty: An Evolutionary Tale          Max Oelschlaeger Applying Systemic Thinking for Teaching Disturbed-Land Reclamation In Brazil           James Jackson Griffith Continuity of Singularities: Urban Architectures, Ecology and the Aesthetics of Restorative Orders


val plumwood, being prey, http://www.utne.com/2000-07-01/being-prey.aspx     


WEBSITES OF INTEREST AND WEBSITE RESOURCES Rollin-Rolston Debate on Environmental Ethics: A debate on environmental ethics between Bernard Rollin and Holmes Rolston took place at Colorado State University on November 29, 1989 in which Rollin defended an animal welfare ethic and doubted the plausibility of an environmental ethic and Rolston defended an environmental ethic. This debate is now available online as a streaming video at Ethics Updates, University of San Diego (thanks to Larry Hinman) at either <http://ethics.sandiego.edu/video/Catalogue/detail.asp?ID_Video=339> or <http://ethics.sandiego.edu/video/Catalogue/detail.asp?ID_Video=340>. A DVD copy is also available on request from Holmes Rolston: <rolston@lamar.colostate.edu>.


––Armstrong, Susan, and Richard G. Botzler, eds. The Animal Ethics Reader, 2nd edition. New York: Routledge, 2008. Contents include: , (62) "Exotic Species, Naturalisation, and Biological Nativism" by Ned Hettinger,

1.––Kraft, Michael E., and Sheldon Kamieniecki, eds. Business and Environmental Policy: Corporate Interests in the American Political System. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007. Contents include: (1) "Analyzing the Role of Business in Environmental Policy" by Michael E. Kraft and Sheldon Kamieniecki, (2) "Framing ANWR: Citizens, Consumers, and the Privileged Position of Business" by Deborah Lynn Guber and Christopher J. Bosso,

Mann, Charles C. "America, Found and Lost." National Geographic Vol. 211, no. 5 (May 2007): 32-67. "Jamestown: the real story: how settlers destroyed a native empire and changed the landscape from the ground up. How the English unsettled the landscape. Far from a pristine wilderness, the land inhabited by the Powhatan Indians was carefully managed. They burned undergrowth to keep the forest open, relocated their villages when crop depleted soils, and ranged widely to fish, hunt, and gather all they needed, moving with the seasons" (p. 46).

McKibben Bill, ed. American Earth: Environmental Writing Since Thoreau. New York: Literary Classics of the United States, 2008 (distributed by Penguin Putnam). Contents include:

from Journals by Henry David Thoreau, (2) from Walden; or, Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau, (3) from Huckleberries by Henry David Thoreau, (4) from Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians by George Catlin, (5) "Fallen Forests" by Lydia Huntley Sigourney, (6) from Rural Hours by Susan Fenimore Cooper, (7) "Table Rock Album" by Susan Fenimore Cooper, (8) "This Compost" from Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman, (9) "Song of the Redwood-Tree" by Walt Whitman, (10) from Man and Nature by George Perkins Marsh, (11) from The Humbugs of the World by P.T. Barnum, (12) from A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf by John Muir, (13) "A Wind-Storm in the Forests" by John Muir, (14) from My First Summer in the Sierra by John Muir, (15) "Hetch Hetchy Valley" by John Muir, (16) from Adventures in the Wilderness by W.H.H. Murray, (17) from A Review of Recent Changes, and Changes Which Have Been Projected, in the Plans of the Central Park by Frederick Law Olmstead, (18) "About Trees" by J. Sterling Morton, (19) "To Frank Michler Chapman" by Theodore Roosevelt, (20) "To John Burroughs" by Theodore Roosevelt, (21) "Speech at Grand Canyon, Arizona, May 6, 1903" by Theodore Roosevelt, (22) "The Scavengers" by Mary Austin, (23) from Man and the Earth by Nathaniel Southgate Shaler, (24) "The Art of Seeing Things" by John Burroughs, (25) "The Grist of the Gods" by John Burroughs, (26) "Nature Near Home" by John Burroughs, (27) "Prosperity" by Gifford Pinchot, (28) "The Bird Tragedy on Laysan Island" by William T. Hornaday, (29) "A Certain Oil Refinery" by Theodore Dreiser, (30) "The Last Passenger Pigeon" by Gene Stratton-Porter, (31) "Orion Rises on the Dunes" by Henry Beston, (32) "The Indigenous and the Metropolitan" by Benton MacKaye, (33) "What a few more seasons will do to the ducks" by J.N. "Ding" Darling, (34) from Wintertrip into New Country by Robert Marshall, (35) "Don Maquis what the ants are saying" by Robert Marshall, (36) "Letter from the Dust Bowl" by Caroline Henderson, (37) "Birds That Are New Yorkers" by Donald Culross Peattie, (38) "The Answer" by Robinson Jeffers, (39) "Carmel Point" by Robinson Jeffers, (40) from The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, (41) "This Land Is Your Land" by Woody Guthrie, (42) from The Everglades: River of Grass by Marjory Stoneman Douglas, (43) from A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold, (44) "The Fog" by Berton Roueché, (45) "The Longest Day" by Edwin Way Teale, (46) from Living the Good Life by Helen and Scott Nearing, (47) "Northern Lights" by Sigurd F. Olson, (48) "Sootfall and Fallout" by E.B. White, (49) "How Flowers Changed the World" by Loren Eiseley, (50) from My Wilderness: The Pacific West by William O. Douglas, (51) "Dissent in Sierra Club v. Morton" by William O. Douglas, (52) from The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs, (53) from Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, (54) "The Great Paver" by Russell Baker, (55) "The Living Canyon" by Eliot Porter, (56) from The Wilderness Act of 1964 by Howard Zahniser, (57) "Remarks at the Signing of the Highway Beautification Act of 1965" by Lyndon B. Johnson, (58) from The Economics of the Coming Spaceship Earth by Kenneth E. Boulding, (59) "On the Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis" by Lynn White Jr., (60) "Polemic: Industrial Tourism and the National Parks" by Edward Abbey, (61) from The Population Bomb by Paul R. Ehrlich, (62) from "The Tragedy of the Commons" by Garrett Hardin, (63) "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" by Philip K. Dickfrom, (64) "A Sample Day in the Kitchen" by Colin Fletcher, (65) "Spaceship Earth" by R. Buckminster Fuller, (66) "Mills College Valedictory Address" by Stephanie Mills, (67) "Smokey the Bear Sutra" by Gary Snyder, (68) "Covers the Ground" by Gary Snyder, (69) "The Beginning" by Denis Hayes, (70) "Millions Join Earth Day Observances Across the Nation" by Joseph Lelyveld, (71) "Big Yellow Taxi" by Joni Mitchell, (72) "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)" by Marvin Gaye, (73) from Encounters with the Archdruid by John McPhee, (74) "Friends of the Earth from Only One Earth" by John McPhee, (75) "Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front" by Wendell Berry, (76) "The Making of a Marginal Farm" by Wendell Berry, (77) "Preserving Wildness" by Wendell Berry, (78) "Fecundity" by Annie Dillard, (79) "The Worlds Biggest Membrane" by Lewis Thomas, (80) "The Third Planet: Operating Instructions" by David R. Brower, (81) from Energy Strategy: The Road Not Taken? By Amory B. Lovins, (82) "A First American Views His Land" by N. Scott Momaday, (83) from Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko, (84) "A Short History of America" by R. Crumb, (85) "Outside the Solar Village: One Utopian Farm" by Wes Jackson, (86) from Love Canal: My Story by Lois Marie Gibbs, (87) from The Fate of the Earth by Jonathan Schell, (88) "Seasons of Want and Plenty" by William Cronon, (89) "Everything Is a Human Being" by Alice Walker, (90) "Bernhardsdorp" by E.O. Wilson, (91) "Wrath of Grapes Boycott Speech" by César Chávez, (92) "A Presentation of Whales" by Barry Lopez, (93) "Place" by W.S. Merwin, (94) from The End of Nature by Bill McKibben, (95) from Dumping in Dixie by Robert D. Bullard, (96) "The Summer Day" by Mary Oliver, (97) from Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place by Terry Tempest Williams, (98) from The Ninemile Wolves by Rick Bass, (99) "The Dubious Rewards of Consumption" by Alan Durning, (100) "After the Flood" by Scott Russell Sanders, (101) from The Last Panda by George B. Schaller, (102) "The Flora and Fauna of Las Vegas" by Ellen Meloy, (103) "Dwellings" by Linda Hogan, (104) from The Ecology of Magic by David Abrams, (105) "The Song of the White Pelican" by Jack Turner, (106) "A Multicultural Approach to Ecopsychology" by Carl Anthony & Renée Soule, (107) "Speech at the Kyoto Climate Change Conference" by Al Gore, (108) from Heart and Blood: Living with Deer in America by Richard Nelson, (109) "Planet of Weeds" by David Quammen, (110) from Ecology of a Cracker Childhood by Janisse Ray, (111) from The Legacy of Luna by Julia Butterfly Hill, (112) from Inspirations for Sustaining Life on Earth by Calvin B. DeWitt, (113) "Greeting Friends in Their Andean Gardens Sandra Steingraber" from Having Faith by Calvin B. DeWitt, (114) "Knowing Our Place" by Barbara Kingsolver, (115) from The Omnivores Dilemma by Michael Pollan, (116) from Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken, and (117) "The Thoreau Problem" by Rebecca Solmit.

––Morton, Timothy. Ecology without Nature: Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007. To have a properly ecological view, we must relinquish, once and for all, the idea of nature. Morton provides a critique of the political and ethical meanings of "place" and "space" and argues for an environmentalism better suited politically to the realities of twenty-first century life. He champions a different vision of dwelling together on a vulnerable planet, with a focus on aesthetics.

––

––Pergams, Oliver R. W., and Patricia A. Zaradic. "Evidence for a Fundamental and Pervasive Shift away from Nature-based Recreation." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), PNAS Early Edition (2008). Available online at: <www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0709893105>. After fifty years of steady increase in per capita visits to natural parks, such as US national parks, visits have declined since 1987, with a cumulative downturn of 18% to 25%. There are similar trends in Japan. The downturn is in camping, hunting, and fishing, although not in hiking and backpacking. Other studies show that interest in conserving nature and environmentally responsible behavior correlate highly with direct contact with the natural environment, so declining nature participation has crucial implications for current conservation efforts. The authors suggest that a major cause is "videophilia" (increased electronic media/internet use). Pergams is in biology at the University of Illinois; Zaradic is in the Environmental Leadership Program at Bryn Mawr College.

Sandel, Michael. The Case against Perfection. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007. Sandel provides a critique of gene enhancement in humans.

––Sideris, Lisa H., and Kathleen Dean Moore, eds. Rachel Carson: Legacy and Challenge. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2008. Contents include: , (17) "How to Value a Flower: Locating Beauty in Toxic Landscapes" by Vera Norwood,


The Ethics of Climate Change: Right and Wrong in a Warming World (Think Now) (Paperback) by James Garvey Continuum International Publishing Group (March 21, 2008)


 Arnold Berleant BEYOND DISINTERESTEDNESS Brit J Aesthetics, 1994; 34: 242 - 254.


On the Origins of "Aesthetic Disinterestedness" Jerome Stolnitz The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism > Vol. 20, No. 2 (Winter, 1961), pp. 131-143


An Alternative to "Aesthetic Disinterestedness" Jerome Schiller The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism > Vol. 22, No. 3 (Spring, 1964), pp. 295-302


Some Questions about the Moral Responsibilities of Drug Companies in Developing Countries

Brock, Dan W Developing World Bioethics, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 33-37, May 2001


An Unequal Activism for an Unequal Epidemic? Selemogo, Mpho Developing World Bioethics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 153-168, May 2005 This paper observes that a substantially large moral duty of dealing with the AIDS situation in Africa has been placed on the drug companies and argues that this approach is inequitable. Using the poverty-AIDS relationship and the human rights framework it argues for a more balanced AIDS activism, which puts equal pressure on all potential stakeholders in the war against AIDS. It argues that this redistribution of the HIV/AIDS moral burden is perhaps the only hope for curbing the African AIDS epidemic that continues to ravage communities on that continent.



Is Self-Identity Image Advertising Ethical? Bishop, John Douglas Business Ethics Quarterly, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 371-398, April 2000 This paper argues that image ads are not false or misleading and that whether or not they advocate false values is a matter of subjective reflection. Image ads can undermine a consumer's self-esteem by collectively omitting images authentic for that sort of person (such as large women) and by combining impossible images with implied gaze. Image ads generally do not undermine autonomy of choice, internal autonomy, or social autonomy. It is concluded that image advertising is a basically ethical technique, but several recommendations are given on how use of image advertising can avoid specific harms. (edited)


Towards a New Paradigm in the Ethics of Women's Advertising Cohan, John Alan Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 323-337, October 2001 This paper identifies the ethical issues involved with women's advertising, and argues that ads can be successful in generating sales without portraying women as things or as mere sex objects, and without perpetuating various weakness stereotypes. A paradigm shift in advertising appears to be at hand. This new model replaces images of women as submissive or constantly in a need of alteration, with a move to reinstate beauty as a natural thing, not an unattainable ideal. (edited)


Children as consumers web site? http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Consumption/Children.asp


COMMENTARY ON CHILDREN AS CONSUMERS. Brenkert, George G Business and Professional Ethics Journal, vol. 3, pp. 147-154, Spring-Summer 1984


The Business Responsibility for Wealth Distribution in a Globalized Political-Economy Merging Moral Economics and Catholic Social Teaching Kohls, John; Christensen, Sandra L Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 223-234, February 2002 This paper asserts that businesses have a responsibility to consider the wealth distribution effects of their wealth-creating decisions. We use arguments from moral economics and Catholic social teaching to support this assertion, deriving decision principles that we apply to the Starbucks fair-trade coffee case. (edited)


Ethical Consumerism: The Case of Fairly-Traded Coffee Bird, Kate; Hughes, David R Business Ethics: A European Review, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 159-167, July 1997   Consumer concern for "ethical products," or ethical aspects of the goods which they purchase, is a subject of increasing interest and research, which is here illustrated by an examination of the Fair Trade movement, with special reference to coffee as an indicative commodity.(edited)



Fair Trade: The Scope of the Debate Anderson, Tim; Riedl, Elisabeth Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 6-18, June           'Fair trade' refers to a bewildering array of quite different proposals. Even 'free trade' often identifies with arguments about fairness. This paper analyses the variants of 'fair trade', dividing the arguments into three broad categories: 'free trade' as fairness, fairness through linking labour rights to trade liberalisation, and fairness through proposals for value redistribution. Each of these broad categories contains important subvariants, which we introduce and explain. We conclude with comments about the legitimacy of the various arguments.



Fair Trade: Three Key Challenges for Reaching the Mainstream

Ferrie, Jared; Hira, Anil Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 107-118, January 2006 This article addresses several major remaining challenges: (a) a lack of agreement about what fair trade really means and how it should be certified; (b) uneven awareness and availability across different areas, with marked differences between some parts of Europe and North America that reflect more fundamental debates about distribution; (c) larger questions about the extent of the potential contribution of fair trade to development under the current system, including limitations on the number and types of workers affected and the fair trade focus on commodity goods. (edited)



Consumer Ethics: An Assessment of Individual Behavior in the Market Place

Fullerton, Sam; Kerch, Kathleen B; Dodge, H Robert Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 805-814, July 1996 ... predisposition of the American marketplace by calculating a consumer ethics index. The results indicate that the population is quite intolerant of perceived ethical abuses. The situations where consumers are ambivalent tend to be those where the seller ...


Reading between the Lines: Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Genetic Testing

Prasad, Kiran; Hull, Sara Chandros Hastings Center Report, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 33-35, May-June 2001 This is a case study in the kinds of problems to expect from this increasingly popular marketing tactic.


Ethnic Marketing Ethics Pires, Guilherme D; Stanton, John Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 111-118, March 2002 This paper reviews the concepts of ethnicity and ethnic groups and their relevance for marketing strategy within an economy where there is a dominant group and also significant minority ethnic groups. The ethical consequences for minority communities ...  


The Relationship between Ethical Business Practices, Government Regulations, and Consumer Rights: An Examination in Saudi Arabia

Bhuian, Shahid N; Abdul-Muhmin, Alhassan G; Kim, David

Business and Professional Ethics Journal, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 47-64, Spring 2002

... government regulations and perceive higher status of consumer rights, when they perceive more ethical business practices. The results are mixed. Ethical practices related to product quality entice consumers to ask for more government regulations, ...


Does Autonomy Count in Favor of Labeling Genetically Modified Food?

Hansen, Kirsten Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 67-76, 2004 In this paper I argue that consumer autonomy does not count in favor of the labeling of genetically modified foods (GM foods) more than for the labeling of non-GM foods. Further, reasonable considerations support the view that it is non-GM ...


Anne Marie Todd - The Aesthetic Turn in Green Marketing: Environmental Consumer Ethics of Natural Personal Care Products - Ethics & the Environment 9:2 Ethics & the Environment 9.2 (2004) 86-102 The Aesthetic Turn in Green Marketing Environmental Consumer Ethics of Natural Personal Care Products Anne Marie Todd Abstract Green consumerism is on the rise in America, but its environmental effects are contested. Does green marketing contribute to the greening of American consciousness, or does it encourage corporate greenwashing? This tenuous ethical position means that eco-marketers must carefully frame their environmental products in a way that appeals to consumers with environmental ethics and buyers who consider natural products as well as conventional items. Thus, eco-marketing constructs a complicated ethical identity for the green consumer. Environmentally aware individuals are already guided by their personal ethics. In trying to attract new consumers, environmentally minded businesses attach an aesthetic quality to environmental goods. In an era where environmentalism is increasingly hip, what are the implications for an environmental ethics infused with a sense of aesthetics? This article analyzes the promotional materials of three companies that advertise their environmental consciousness: Burt's Bee's Inc., Tom's of Maine, Inc., and The Body Shop Inc. Responding to an increasing online shopping market, these companies make their promotional ...

 

Allen Carlson, "Arnold Berleant's Environmental Aesthetics," Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (2007): 217-225.


"Aesthetics and Environment," British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2006): 416-427. Same as above? I printed out.


Allen Carlson, "The Requirements for an Adequate Aesthetics of Nature, "Environmental Philosophy 4 (2007): 1-12.


Allen Carlson, “The Aesthetic Appreciation of Environmental Architecture under Different Conceptions of Environment”, Journal of Aesthetic Education. 40.4 (2006) 77-88.


Thomas Hill, “Finding Value in Nature” Environmental Values 15, 1 2006 pp. 331-342 good material on intrinsic value and appreciating for own sake.


Frank Sibley, “Tastes, Semells, and Aesthetics,” in John Benson, et at., Approaches to Aesthetics: collected Papers on Philosophicla Aesthetics (Oxford, 2001)


Jane Horwath “Nature’s Moods” British Journal of Aesthetics, 35:2 1995.


Ron Moore, "The Framing Paradox" that appeared first in ETHICS, PLACE, AND ENVIRONMENT 9:3 (Oct. 2006) 249-267


Barry Saddler and Allen Carlson, 1982 Environmental Aesthetics: Essays in Interpretation


Katie McShane, Anthropocentrism vs Nonanthropocentrims: Why Should we Care? Environmental Values 16,2 2007


Joseph DesJarkins, Business, Ethics, and the Environment: Imagining a Sustainable Future Prentice Hall 2007.


Brady, E. 2006. 'Aesthetics in Practice: Valuing the Natural World', Environmental Values, 15:3, 2006 277-291. (O’Neill says that she discusses conflicts between particular forms of aes value and other env. Values).



Dan Phillips, “Thoreau’s Aesthetics and the “Domain of the Superlative’ Environmental Values, 15:3, 2006

Susan Stewart, “Response to Brady Phillips and Rolston” Environmental Values, 15:3, 2006 argues that aes values might serve as foundational for preserving the planet


Ethics and Climate Change articles including response by Peter Singer Environmental Values, 15:3, 2006


Also Thomas Hill, “Finding Value in Nature,” Environmental Values, 15:3, 2006. Argues that proper valuing of natural environment is essential to human virtue called apprecation of the good; no need for meta of IV and not anthropocentric. Sounds like O’Neill’s view.


The future of env. Philosophy, including Bill Throop, Dale Jamieson and more, Ethics and Environment 12,2 Fall 2997.


Farming and the Fate of Wild Nature: Essays in conservation based agriculture, 2006 with Berry, kingslover, Pollan Bass, nabahm. Looks good


Moral outgrage, hypocrisy and the Spanish bullfight, Bathryn Bailey Ethics and The Environment 12, 1 spring 2007


Eric Katz’s review of William Jordan’s Sunflower Forest in Ethics and The Environment 12, 1 spring 2007


video presentations of space science env. Ethics http://www.cep.unt.edu/ames/video.html

includes terraforming mars, "Do We Need a Planetary Ethic?" Carl Mitcham - Taking Exploration Ethics and Engineering Ethics into Space: An Aristotelian Perspective             William Hartmann - The Beauty of the Solar System         Eugene Hargrove - Valuing Extraterrestrial Life


Sandra and Lewis Hinchman, “What We Owe the Romantics,” Environmental Values 16,3 2007 pp. 333-354. Looks quite good and relevant to aes and env.



R.A. Sharpe, “The empiricist Theory of Artistic Value,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2000): 326-237


“The Ethics of Consumption,” No Dogs or Philosophers allowed, Instructional Video with David Crocker, Lisa Newton and Judith Lichtenberg.


Chalres Mann, 1491 The Atlantic Monthly March 2002 on how natives so populated and made the land that rainforest is a human artifact.


Stephen R. Kellert, Nature and Human Nature: Values and Perceptions of the Natural Environment Island Press.


 Andy Fisher, Radical Ecopsychology SUNY


Glenn mcGee, The Perfect Baby: Parenthood in the new world of cloning and geneticsI 2nd ed


Thomas White, In Defense of Dolphins (Blackwell) (recent 2006-7?)


Jason Brennan, “Dominating Nature”, Environmental Values 16 (2007)” 513-528.


MARCIA MUELDER EATON (2008) Aesthetic Obligations Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1), 1–9.


Jerrold Levinson, "Hume’s ‘Standard of Taste’: The Real Problem" Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Summer 2002.


Allen Carlson, "The Requirements for an Adequate Aesthetics of Nature, "Environmental Philosophy 4 (2007): 1-12.


Allen Carlson, "Arnold Berleant's Environmental Aesthetics," Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (2007): 217-225.


The Aesthetics of Huma


Arthur Danto, “the Vietnam Veterans Memorial,” from The nation in Higgins ed., aesthetics in perspective.


Chellis Glendinning, “Notes toward a Neo-Luddite Manifesto,” in Robert C. Scharff and Val Dusek, Philosophy of Technology:

The Technological Condition (Blackwell, 2003), 603-5.

Langdom Winner, “Luddism as Epistemology,” in Robert C. Scharff and Val Dusek, Philosophy of Technology: The

Technological Condition (Blackwell, 2003), 606-11.


Our Land, Ourselves: Readings on People and Place (Paperback)

by Peter Forbes (Editor), Ann Ambrecht Forbes (Editor), Helen Whybrow (Editor) great selection of articles; Callicott and Keller used.


Cadillac Desert: Water and the Transformation .

Video: Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water | Media Adaptations In 1997, PBS, in association with KCET/Los Angeles, aired a four-part documentary called Cadillac Desert. The first three episodes of the series, ‘‘Mulholland’s Dream,’’ ‘‘An American Nile,’’ and ‘‘The Mercy of Nature,’’ were based on Reisner’s book, while the fourth episode (‘‘Last Oasis’’) was based on the book of the same name by Sandra Postel. The series, a production of Trans Pacific Television and KTEH/ San Jose Public Television, won a Silver Baton for the filmmakers (Reisner, Jon Else, and Sandra Itkoff) at the 1998 Alfred I


Frank Sibley, “Art or Aesthetics: which comes first?” Philosophy of the Arts 1992.


Frank Sibley, “Objectivity and Aesthetics,” Proceedings of the Aristotelean Society, Supplementary vol 42 1968.


Ruth Chang, “All things considered,” Philosophical Perspectives 18 Ethics, 2004 John suggested as way to integrate aes value with other values


Mary Devereau, “The Ugly” Aes online.


Peg Zeblin Brand, ed., Beauty Matters (Indiana U. Press, 2000).


Review of Peg Brand 200 IUP’s Beauty Matters by Robert Wilkinson open university. I have.

Encountering Nature: Toward an Environmental Culture, Thomas Heyd, University of Victoria 2007 Ashgate

 

McKibben web sites recommended

            focusthenation.org

            www.stepitup2007.org

www.epa.gov/climatechange/kids

www.newdreams.org

 

Barry Lopez, ed., the Future of Nature (Writing on human ecology from Orion magazine

 

Clare Palmer’s “Rethinking Animal Ethics in appropriate context: How rolston’s Work can Help” for help on aesthetics of predation. In Preston/Ouderkirk, Nature Value Duty 183-201 2006 Springer

 

Marcia Eaton, “Dangerous Beauties,” Philosophic Exchange,1999-2000, pp. 34-51.

Marcia Eaton, “Aesthetic Assessments of Multi-Functional Landscapes,” Conference on Multi-Functional Landscapes, Proceedings, Roskilde, Denmark,2002.

 

 

David W. Orr The LAST REFUGE: Patriotism, Politics, and the Environment in an Age of Terror

 

Preston, Christopher J. and Ouderkirk, Wayne (Eds.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III (Springer, 2007) Series: The International Library of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Ethics , Vol. 8

2007, XX, 280 p., Hardcover

ISBN: 978-1-4020-4877-7

 

 

Avant Garde art

 

John Fisher’s Reflecting on Art, chapter 5 “The Challenge of the Avant-Garde”, p. 119 and following.

 

Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), includes: 45. Aesthetics of the Avant-Garde , Gregg Horowitz

 

TI: Avant-Garde Art and the Problem of Theory AU: Carroll,-Noel SO: Journal-of-Aesthetic-Education. Fall 95; 29(3): 1-13

 

              James O. Young ARTWORKS AND ARTWORLDS Brit J Aesthetics, 1995; 35: 330 - 337. ......disagreement between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. We should, again, relativize arthood to an artworld. Relative to the dada or avant-garde artworld, Fountain is an artwork. Relative to the conservative artworld, it is a non-artwork. There is no absurdity......

 

 

 

S. J. Wilsmore AUTHENTICITY AND RESTORATION Brit J Aesthetics, 1986; 26: 228 - 238.

 

Mark Sagoff, “On Restoring and Reproducing Art,” The Journal of Philosophy LXXV: 9, September 1978, pp. 453-470.

 

H. Hein the Museum in Transition: A Philosophical Perspective Smithsonian Institute Press, 2000

 

Lars Aagaard-Mogensen, The idea of Museum: Philosophical, Artistic and Political Questions, Edwin Mellen Press, 1988.

 

Albert Levi, “The Art Museum as a Agency of Culture,” Journal of Aesthetic Education 19:2 , 1985, 23-40.

 

Philosophy of Wolf Policies I: General Principles and Preliminary Exploration of Selected Norms Arne Naess, Ivar Mysterud Conservation Biology, Vol. 1, No. 1 (May, 1987), pp. 22-34

 

Arne Naess, Self-Realization in Mixed Communities of Humans, Bears, Sheep, and Wolves The Trumpter, Vol 22, No 1 (2006) Special Issue

http://trumpeter.athabascau.ca/index.php/trumpet/article/view/902/1327

 

 

On Buddhist env. Ethics. http://www.cbs.columbia.edu/weblog/2007/10/peter-harvey-un.html (Jamieson rec) ISSN 1076-9005 Volume 14, 2007 Avoiding Unintended Harm to the Environment and the Buddhist Ethic of Intention (1) Peter Harvey

 

 

 Colorization of movies/photographs (see defense by James O. Young British Journal of Aesthetics 28 (1988) 368-72 and Yuriko Saito”Contemporary Aesthetic Issue: The Colorization Controversy” Journal of Aesthetics Education 23:2 1989 21-31 

 

Philosophy & Public Policy Quarterly Volume 27, Number 3/4, Summer/Fall 2007; Environmentalism: Death and Resurrection Mark Sagoff;

 

 The Gospel According to Conservation Biology, by Robert H. Nelson Abstract: the field of con bio presents itself as a science but its policy prescriptions reflect a powerful set of values. On closer examination, these values turn out to be religious and specifically to be derived from Christian sources. Conservation biologists need to pay more attention to this theological side of their discipline. Philosophy & Public Policy Quarterly Volume 27, Number 3/4, Summer/Fall 2007; http://www.publicpolicy.umd.edu/IPPP/quarterly.html

 

 

LARRY SHINER, YULIA KRISKOVETS (2007) The Aesthetics of Smelly Art Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (3), 273–286.

 

 Rafael DeClercq, "The Concept of am Aesthetic Property," (JAAC, spring 2002) where he argues that value is an essential part of aesthetic properties

 

Always the Mountains By David Rothenberg Now Available in Paperback $18.95 | ISBN 978-0-8203-2953-6 U of Georgia Press

 

Everyday Aesthetics, Yuriko Saito Price: Oxford U. Press, £30.00 (Hardback) ISBN-10: 0-19-927835-0 ISBN-13: 978-0-19-927835-0 Estimated publication date: November 2007

 

Some Political Problems for Rewilding Nature, John Hintz Ethics, Place & Environment, Volume 10, Issue 2 June 2007 , pages 177 - 216 Recent studies in conservation biology have provided the wilderness preservation movement with a spark. Wilderness, we are told, can no longer be seen as a scenic playground for weary humans - it is, rather, an ecological necessity for the conservation of biodiversity. This paper traces the science and political ideologies that inspire and inform this reinvigorated cadre of environmentalists. Through empirical investigations of one prominent conservation group and one conservation campaign, the author finds that this environmentalism offers simplistic and purportedly self-evident solutions to the complex problems of biodiversity and wilderness conservation.

 

Engaging Berleant: A Critical Look at Aesthetics and Environment: Variations on a Theme

Renee Conroy Ethics, Place & Environment, Volume 10, Issue 2 June 2007 , pages 217 - 244

 

Joshua Gert, Neo-Sentimentalism and Disgust The Journal of Value Inquiry Volume 39, Numbers 3-4 / December, 2005 Pages 345-352

 

Christopher Knapp, "Demoralizing Disgust," Philosophical and Phenomenological Research, March, 2003.

 

Baylor Johnson, “Ethical Obligations in Tragedy of the Commons,” Env Values 12,3, August 2003 (I have in pdf) and paper he gave at ISEE 07 “Unilateral actions in Tragedy of the Commons” http://www.environmentalphilosophy.org/ISEEIAEPpapers/2007/Johnson.pdf

 

Elizabeth Anderson, Value in Ethics and Economics Harvard 1993.

 

Gerald Gaus, Value and Justification: The foundations of Liberal Theory 1990 Cambridge

 

 

The Nature of Value and the Value of Nature: A Philosophical Overview Ben Rogers International Affairs (Royal Institute of International Affairs 1944-), Vol. 76, No. 2, Special Biodiversity Issue (Apr., 2000), pp. 315-323 (our library on line)

 

Glenn Parsons, “Theory, Observation, and the Role of Scientific Understanding in the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2006) 165-186

 

 Glenn Parsons, “The Aesthetics of Nature,” Philosophy Compass 2 (2007) Published article online: 23 Mar 2007 The aesthetics of nature is a growing sub-field of contemporary aesthetics. In this article, I outline the view called ‘Scientific cognitivism’, which has been central in recent discussions of nature aesthetics. In assessing two important arguments for this view, I outline some recent thinking about key issues for the aesthetics of nature, including the relationship between nature and art and the relevance of ethical considerations to the aesthetic appreciation of nature.

 

Vitor Stenger, God, The Failed Hypothesis: How Science Shows that God Does Not Exist Prometheus, 2007

 

 

Rachels, James, 1978. “What People Deserve,” in John Arthur and William H. Shaw, eds., Justice and Economic Distribution, (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall), pp. 150-163.

 

Korsmeyer, Carolyn, 2005. “Terrible Beauties, ” in Matthew Kieran, ed., Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (Malden, MA: Blackwell), pp. 51-64.

 

Walton, Kendall (2002), “Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality,” in Alex Neill and Aaron ridley, Arguing About Art, 2nd ed. (New York: Routledge).

 

Saito, Yuriko “Everyday Aesthetics,” Philosophy and Literature - Volume 25, Number 1, April 2001, pp. 87-95 I have

 

Saito, Yuriko “The Role of Aesthetics in Civic Environmentalism,” in The Aesthetics of Human Environments. Co-edited Berleant and Allen Carlson. (Peterborough, Ont: Broadview,2007 ).

 

Corporal Compassion: Animal Ethics and Philosophy of Body (Hardcover)

by Ralph R. Acampora (Author) U. Of Pittsburgh Press 2006

 

Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy: An Introduction (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Biology) (Hardcover) by Sahotra Sarkar Cambridge 2005 In Library

Jay Odenbaugh responds to Sarkar in Biology and Philsophy. 

 

Sinnott-Armstrong, “It’s Not My Fault: Global Warming and Individual Moral Obligation” in Perspectives on Climate Change: Science, Economics, Politics, Ethics, ed. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Richard Howarth (Elsevier, 2005)

 

May, R., J. Lawton, and N. Stork (1995) Assessing Extinction Rates,in /Extinction Rates/ (eds.) J. Lawton and R. May, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2.Rosenzweig, M. (2003) Reconciliation Ecology and the Future of Species Diversity,/Oryx /37:194-205.

 

Petra Andersson Humanity and Nature: Towards a Consistent Holistic Environmental Ethics 2007 (I have. She sent me. Looks interesting. Possibly good on relation human and nature and degrees of natural.

 

 

Begin search for library buying October 11, 2006

Michael Pollan, NY Times around May 16, 2006 “Walmart goes organic; now the bad news”

 

George Sessions, “Wildness, Cyborgs, and Our Ecological Future: Reassessing the Deep Ecology Movement” the Trumpeter Volume 22, Number 2 (2006) I have on computer. Makes reference to my and Bill Throop’s paper

 

Aes stuff I need to read:

 

Paradoxes and Puzzles: Appreciating Gardens and Urban Nature

  by Stephanie Ross VOLUME 4 (2006) Contemporary Aesthetics: http://www.contempaesthetics.org/newvolume/pages/article.php?articleID=400 To explore our appreciation of gardens and urban nature, I propose a recursive definition of original or wild nature together with guidelines for discerning degrees of naturalness. Arguing (contra Robert Elliott) that nature can be restored as well as degraded, I characterize four varieties of urban nature – interrupted, altered, constructed, and virtual. I build on Stan Godlovitch's comments about scale to suggest two modes of appreciation – macroscopic and fine-focused. I close by discussing some particular examples – parks, environmental art, gardens – and drawing some conclusions for the appreciation of vernacular gardens

 

Agriculture, Aesthetic Appreciation and the Worlds of Nature

  by Pauline von Bonsdorff http://www.contempaesthetics.org/newvolume/pages/article.php?articleID=325

ABSTRACT Agriculture has received relatively little attention in environmental aesthetics, given its importance culturally for the physical sustenance of societies and from an eco-system perspective. In this article I take some steps towards developing a life-world approach to the agricultural landscape, where the intimate and long-term relationship between farmer and land is understood as having the potential for being a norm rather than the opposite of an aesthetic appreciation of landscape. This requires a narrative understanding of landscape, where culture and nature are seen as plural and relative to each other. I claim that the aesthetic competence of the farmer is inseparable from personal interest, which makes appreciation more acute and vivid both in perceiving nuances and in realising the existential drama of landscape. Finally I suggest that practicing agriculture is a genuine way of knowing nature and that some familiarity with agriculture should be included in all environmental education. Contemporary Aesthetics: Volume 3 2005,

 

Aaron Smuts   Are Video Games Art? Contemporary Aesthetics: Volume 3 2005, http://www.contempaesthetics.org/newvolume/pages/article.php?articleID=299

In this paper I argue that by any major definition of art many modern video gamesshould be considered art. Rather than defining art and defending video games based on a single contentious definition, I offer reasons for thinking that video games can be art according to historical, aesthetic, institutional, representational and expressive theories of art. Overall, I argue that while many video games probably should not be considered art, there are good reasons to think that some video games should be classified as art, and that the debates concerning the artistic status of chess and sports offer some insights into the status of video games.

 

Tiffany Sutton            Immersive Contemplation in Video Art Environments also in Contemporary Aesthetics: Volume 3 2005,

 

#

A Humean Approach to Assessing the Moral Significance of Ultra-Violent Video GamesPreview By: Wonderly, Monique. Ethics and Information Technology, 10(1), 1-10, 10 p. 2008. Abstract Available (AN PHL2122626)Add to folder Remove from folder

# 2.

Locating the Wrongness in Ultra-Violent Video GamesPreview By: Waddington, David I. Ethics and Information Technology, 9(2), 121-128, 8 p. 2007. Abstract Available (AN PHL2107859)

Linked Full Text

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# 3.

Violent Computer Games, Empathy, and CosmopolitanismPreview By: Coeckelbergh, Mark. Ethics and Information Technology, 9(3), 219-231, 13 p. 2007. Abstract Available (AN PHL2122038)

Linked Full Text

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# 4.

Is It Wrong to Play Violent Video Games?Preview By: McCormick, Matt. Ethics and Information Technology, 3(4), 277-287, 11 p. 2001. Abstract Available (AN PHL1701627)

Linked Full Text

Add to folder

 

Yuriko Saito   Machines in the Ocean: The Aesthetics of Wind Farms Contemporary Aesthetics: Volume 2 2004,

Jon Boone       The Aesthetic Dissonance of Industrial Wind Machines

Yuriko Saito   Response to Jon Boone’s Critique

Both in . Contemporary Aesthetics: Volume 3 2005 available on line at

http://www.contempaesthetics.org/newvolume/pages/journal.php?volume=3

 

Wolfgang Welsch       Animal Aesthetics Contemporary Aesthetics: Volume 2 2004,

 

Arnold Berleant and Ronald Hepburn            An Exchange on Disinterestedness Contemporary Aesthetics Vol 1 2003 http://www.contempaesthetics.org/newvolume/pages/article.php?articleID=209

 

Glenn Parsons, “ Nature, Aesthetic Values, and Urban Design: Building the Natural City” in Kroes, Light et al., Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture Springer Netherlands    2008 In this chapter, I consider the relationship between the aesthetic appreciation of the built environment and the aesthetic appreciation of the natural environment, with an eye to pursuing its implications for the role of design in urban planning. In section 1, I describe some ways of thinking about the aesthetic, common in traditional environmental thought, according to which very different forms of aesthetic appreciation are appropriate for each sort of environment. In section 2, I outline a somewhat different approach to understanding the aesthetic, one that holds out the promise of a more unified approach. In section 3, I attempt to deliver on this promise by pointing out a similarity between the ‘visual order’ of the natural environment and that of the built environment. This also reveals an important similarity in their aesthetic character. Section 4 consists of an effort to clarify this claim, and to draw out some of its ramifications for our broader understanding of urban design processes. In section 5, I conclude by considering three objections to my claim.

 

Parsons, Glenn. "The Aesthetic Value of Animals." Environmental Ethics 29(2007):151-169. Although recent work in philosophical aesthetics has brought welcome attention to the beauty of nature, the aesthetic appreciation of animals remains rarely discussed. The existence of this gap in aesthetic theory can be traced to certain ethical difficulties with aesthetically appreciating animals. These difficulties can be avoided by focusing on the aesthetic quality of Òlooking fit for function.Ó This approach to animal beauty can be defended against the view that Òlooking fitÓ is a non-aesthetic quality and against Edmund Burke's famous critique of the connection between fitness and the beauty of animals. (EE)

 

Parsons, Glenn. ÒNatural Functions and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Inorganic Nature.Ó British Journal of Aesthetics Vol. 44, no. 1 (2004): 44-56.

 

Parsons, Glenn. ÒTheory, Observation, and the Role of Scientific Understanding in the Aesthetic Experience of Nature.Ó Canadian Journal of Philosophy Vol. 3, no. 2 (2006): 165-86.

 

Parsons, Glenn. ÒNature Appreciation, Science and Positive Aesthetics.Ó British Journal of Aesthetics Vol. 42, no, 3 (2002): 279-95.

 

Glenn Parsons review of Budd’s The Aesthetic Appreciation of nature, Mind vol 113 (2004), 741-744.

 

Glenn Parsons Moderate Formalism as a Theory of the Aesthetic”, Journal of Aes Education 38 2004 1-17.

 

Glenn Parsons, “Natural functions and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Inorganic Nature,” British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2004) 44-56. 

 

1.30-3.3 Nick Zangwill (University of Durham) "Clouds of Illusion in the Aesthetics of Nature" Respondent: Amelie Rorty (Harvard University) On Friday March 9, 2007 the Department of Philosophy at Boston University (a)will host the annual Karbank Symposium in Environmental Philosophy. Zangwill’s article was published. See elsewhere in this bib.

 

 Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), includes:

Part One: Background Philosophical Aesthetics: an Overview , Jerrold Levinson

2. History of Modern Aesthetics , Paul Guyer

3. Part Two: General Issues in Aesthetics Aesthetic Realism 1 , Nick Zangwill

4. Aesthetic Realism 2 , John Bender

5. Aesthetic Experience , Gary Iseminger

6. Beauty , Nick Zangwill

7. Aesthetics of Nature , Malcolm Budd

8. Definition of Art , Robert Stecker

9. Ontology of Art , Stephen Davies

10. Medium in Art , David Davies

11. Representation in Art , Alan Goldman

12. Expression in Art , Aaron Ridley

13. Style in Art , Stephanie Ross

14. Creativity in Art , Philip Alperson

15. Authenticity in Art , Denis Dutton

16. Intention in Art , Paisley Livingston

17. Interpretation in Art , Gregory Currie

18. Value in Art , Robert Stecker

19. Humour , Noel Carroll

20. Metaphor , Ted Cohen

21. Fiction , Peter Lamarque

22. Narrative , George Wilson

23. Tragedy , Aaron Ridley

24. Art and Emotion , Alex Neill

25. Art and Knowledge , Berys Gaut

26. Art and Morality , Matthew Kieran

27. Art and Politics , Lydia Goehr

28. Part Three: Aesthetic Issues of Specific Artforms Music , Stephen Davies

29. Painting , Susan Feagin

30. Literature , Paisley Livingston

31. Architecture , Gordon Graham

32. Sculpture , Robert Hopkins

33. Dance , Noel Carroll

34. Theatre , Paul Woodruff

35. Poetry , Alex Neill

36. Photography , Nigel Warburton

37. Film , Berys Gaut

38. Part Four: Further Directions in Aesthetics Feminist Aesthetics , Mary Devereaux

39. Environmental Aesthetics , John Fisher

40. Comparative Aesthetics , Kathleen Higgins

41. Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology , Denis Dutton

42. Aesthetics and Cognitive Science , Gregory Currie

43. Aesthetics and Ethics , Richard Eldridge

44. Aesthetics of Popular Art , David Novitz

45. Aesthetics of the Avant-Garde , Gregg Horowitz

46. Aesthetics of the Everyday , Crispin Sartwell

47. Aesthetics and Postmodernism , Richard Shusterman

48. Aesthetics and Cultural Studies , Deborah Knight

 

Anthony Savile, The Test of Time (oxford 1982), ch 8 on how aes of nature should be like aes app of art.

 

Karen Green, “Two Distinctions in Env. Goodness,” Env Values 51 31-46 1996.

 

Simon Hailwood, 1999, “Towards a Liberal Environment” Journal of Applied Philosophy 16: 271-81: has a section arguing that nature’s otherness has value. Nature as other

 

Bruze Foltz’s view “On Heidegger and the Interpretation of Env. Crisis” Env ethics 6, 1984, p. 30

 

J. Baird Callicott "The Land Aesthetic," in Armstrong and Botzler, Environmental Ethics: 148-157; and in Christopher Key Chapple, Ecological Prospects: 169-183.

 

J. Baird Callicott “Wetland Gloom, Wetland Glory,Philosophy and Geography 6 (2003): 33-45.

 

 

Sepanmaa argues for need for such applied env. Aes in Beauty of Env and in “Applied Aesthetics” in Art and Beyond: finish Approaches to Aes eds Ossi Naukkarinen 1955, pp. 226-248.

 

Paul Gobster, “An Ecological Aesthetics for Forest Landscape Management” Landscape Journal Volume 18, 1, spring 1999 page 54 Although aesthetics and ecological sustainability are two highly regared values of forest landscapes, practices developed to manage forests for these values can sometimes conflict with one another. In this paper I argue that such conflicts are rooted in our conception of forest aesthetics as scenery, and propose that a normative, `ecological aesthetic` based on the writings of Aldo Leopold and others could help resove conflicts between aesthetic and sustainability values. I then offer suggestions on how we might advance an ecological aesthetic in policy and planning programs, on-the-ground management, and research and theory developement in landscape aesthetics. I have and available at http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:eNk1u3ykIAoJ:ncrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/jrnl/1999/nc_1999_Gobster_001.pdf+callicott+aesthetic&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=8

 

 

Callicott, "Wetlands: Gloom or Glory" -- paper for the Conference on Environmental Aesthetics, Utah State University, Logan Utah, September 27, 2002.

 

Four papers focused on issues in environmental aesthetics: Yrjö Sepänmaa’s “How to Speak of Mount Koli? The Exemplary Position of Koli in Environmental Research,” Glenn Parsons’s “Knowledge, Perception and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature” and Ira Newman’s “The Dream of an Autonomous Natural Aesthetic: Leopold and Callicott on the Land Aesthetic.”

 

Russow, Lilly-Marlene. (1981). "Why Do Species Matter?" Environmental Ethics (3), 101-12.

 

Stan Godlovitch, SOME THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AESTHETIC. S GODLOVITCH The Journal of aesthetic education 32:44, 17-26, University of Illinois Press, 1998.

 

S GODLOVITCH - The Journal of aesthetic education, 1990

Boors and Bumpkins, Snobs and Snoots. S GODLOVITCH The Journal of aesthetic

education 24:22, 65-73, University of Illinois Press, 1990. ...

 

Godlovitch, Positive aesthetics and Conservation Priorities unpublished

 

Stan Godlovitch, VALUING NATURE AND THE AUTONOMY OF NATURAL AESTHETICS

 

 

Arthur Danto, “The Artistic Enfranchisement of Real Objects, the Artworld,” Journal of Philosophy 61 (1964): 571-584

 

Nelson Potter, “Aesthetic value in Nature and in the Arts,” in Hugh Curtler, ed., What is Art? 1983

 

Ralph Winn, “The Beauty of Nature and Art,” Journal of aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 1942, 3-13.

 

J.M. Moravcsik, “Beauty in Art and in Nature,” Philosophical Studies, vol 38 (1980).

 

Allen Carlson, “Budd and Brady on the Aesthetics of Nature," Philosophical Quarterly 55 (2005): 107-114.

 

Brady, E. 2006. 'Aesthetics in Practice: Valuing the Natural World', Environmental Values, 15:3, 2006 277-291. (O’Neill says that she discusses conflicts between particular forms of aes value and other env. Values).

 

Brady, E. 2006.'The Aesthetics of Agricultural Landscapes and the Relationship between Humans and Nature', Ethics, Place and Environment, 9:1, 1-19.

 

Brady, E., Holland, A. and Rawles, K. 2004.'Walking the Talk: Philosophy of Conservation on the Isle of Rum,' Worldviews: Environment, Culture, Religion, 8:2, 280-297.

 

Brady, E. and Brook, I. 2003. 'Topiary: Ethics and Aesthetics,' Ethics and the Environment, 8:1, 127-42.

 

See John O’Neill, “Beauty and the Bees,” Environmental Values 16/4 (November 2007), 413-415 on some problems for equating natural beauty and wildness/ruralness and conflict with other env. Values.

 

Gordan Graham, Philosophy of the Arts, (Rutledge) various editions, has section on Aesthetics of nature and objectivity/subjectivity.

 

Stephen Davies, Philosophy of Art (an intro).

 

Lamarque and Olsen, eds., Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: The Analytic Tradition (Blackwell Philosophy Anthologies) looks like good for class?

 

Objectivity in aes

John Bener, “Supervenience and the Justifiaction of Aesthetic Judgments” JAAC 46:1, 1987 31-40.

 

Mountain Gloom and Mountain Glory: The Development of the Aesthetics of the Infinite

by Marjorie Hope Nicolson, Marjorie H. Nicholson, * Paperback - REPRINT * ISBN: 0295975776

 

Carlson reply to Saito Is there a correct ....1986 journal of aes ed.

 

Nick Zangwill, The Metaphysics of Beauty, Cornell University Press, 2001.

 

Nick Zangwill says he is working on The aesthetics of inorganic nature (more reasons to be formalist).

 

Nick Zangwill, Formal Natural Beauty (defense of formalism in reply to Carlson and Budd)

 

Nick Zangwill, “Formal Natural Beauty,” Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Vol 101, #1 (2001): pp. 209 - 224.

Nick Zangwill, “Rocks and Sunsets: A Defense of Ignorant Pleasures,” Revista di Estetica, n.s., 29 (2/2005), XLV, pp. 53-59.

Nick Zangwill,“In Defense of Extreme Formalism about Inorganic Nature: Reply to Parsons”, British Journal of Aesthetics, 2005, pp. 185-191.

 

 

Intro to Carlson’s and Berleant’s The Aesthetics of Natural Environments

And in side:

            Ronald Moore, App Natural Beauty as Natural

            Don Crawford Scenery and the Aes of Nature

            Foster?, Berleant? Sepanmaa?

 

 

Canadian Journal of Philosophy special issue on env. Aesthetics

 

Journal of Aes Education special issue on env. Aesthetics

 

 Allen Carlson: What is the Correct Curriculum for Landscape? In Andrew Light and Jonathan M. Smith: Introduction: Everyday Aesthetics and the Aesthetics of the Everyday (Columbia, 2005)

 

Alan Goldman, “the Experiential Account of Aesthetic Value” in JAAC 64,3 (Summer 2006): 333-342.

 

Willard. D. “On preserving nature’s aesthetic features” Environmental Ethics, 1980, Vol 2 (4), pp. 293-310.

 

Thomas Kapper, “Bringing Beauty to Account in the Environmental Impact Statement: The Contingent Valuation of Landscape Aesthetics” Environmental Practice (2004), 6: 296-305 Cambridge University Press Landscape aesthetic values can easily be overlooked or undervalued in the environmental impact statement (EIS) process. Public sector projects may underestimate the aesthetic damage they cause, which, if fully considered, could alter the types of projects undertaken or the form those projects take. This article seeks to more persuasively represent the aesthetic damage wrought by a public project by attaching to it a dollar figure. Cost-benefit analysis is often incorporated into the EIS, but for cost-benefit analysis to be valid, all costs and benefits must be fairly represented. To exclude aesthetic value from the analysis on the basis that beauty is intangible or priceless is to assign it a de facto value of zero in cost-benefit calculations. The monetizing of aesthetics is approached by integrating the methods of economic contingent valuation with landscape aesthetic assessment. Economic values and aesthetic values can be reconciled; a demonstration of the integration of methods is provided.

 

Glenn Parsons, “Nature Appreciation, Science and Positive Aesthetics” British Journal of Aesthetics 42,3, July 2002.

 

Patricia Matthews, Aesthetic Appreciation of Art and Nature, British Journal of Aesthetics 41,4 October 2001

 

David Richardson, “Nature-Appreciation Conventions and the Art World,” British Journal of Aesthetics 16 1976, pp. 186-191.

 

on preserving the natural environment, mark sagoff Yale Law Journal 1974

 

Donald Crawford, Comparing Natural and artistic beauty in Salim Kermal and Ivan Gaskell, Landscape, Natural Beauty and the Arts (Cambridge, 1993). On how two are differeint and art thought to be superior in some ways

 

Yuriko Saito, “the greening of aes”Copen www.publicnature.com/co-gen 2004

 

Robert L. Thayer, Jr., Gray World, Green Heart: Technology, Nature, and the Sustainable Landscape (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1994),

 

Aesthetics, Community Character, and the Law, Christopher Duerksen, Matthew Goebel

American Planning Association Publication, 1999 (Saito says helps with the thick env. Values)

 

 

John Fisher, Env. Aesthetics in in Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), pp. 667

Matthew Kieran:

 “Aesthetic Value: Beauty, Ugliness and Incoherence”, Philosophy, Vol. 72, No. 2, July 1997, pp. 383-399.

“In Defence of the Ethical Evaluation of Narrative Art”, British Journal of Aesthetics, Jan. 2001, pp. 26-38.

“A Divine Intimation: Appreciating Natural Beauty”, Journal of Value Inquiry, vol. 31, No. 1, 1997, March, pp. 77-95.

“The Value of Art” in Berys Gaut and Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.) Routledge Companion to Aesthetics (London: Routledge, 2001), pp. 215-225 (new edition in press) we have in library

# “Forbidden Knowledge: The Challenge of Cognitive Immoralism” in S. Gardner and J. Bermudez (eds.), Art and Morality (London: Routledge, 2002) (I have)

 

Matthew Kieran, Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value” Philosophy Compass ½ 2006 129-143 (I have)

Matthew Kieran, “Art and Morality” in Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Aesthetics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), pp. 451-470.

 

T.J. Diffey, “Experiencing Nature and Experiencing Art,” in Art and Experience, ed. Ananta Sukla (Praeger, 2003)

Terry Diffey, “Arguing about the Environment,” British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2000): 133-148

Terry Diffey, 1993, “Natural Beauty without Metaphysics,” in Kemal and Gaskel, eds., Landscape, natural beauty and the Arts (Cambridge) pp. 43-64 includes critique of positive aes?

The Aesthetics of Human Environments. Co-edited Berleant and Allen Carlson. (Peterborough, Ont: Broadview,2007 ).

The Aesthetics of Human Environments. Co-edited Berleant and Allen Carlson. (Peterborough, Ont: Broadview,2007 ) , includes Pauline von Bonsdorff, "Urban Richness and the Art of Building, Arnold Berleant, Cultivating an Urban Aesthetics, Yrjo Sepanmaa "Multi-sensoriness and the City", David Maccauley "Waling the city" , Kevin Melchionne, "living in Glass houses: Domesticity, Interior Decoration, and Environmental Aesthetics" Sally Schauman, "The Garden and the Red Barn: The Pervasive Pastoral and its environmental consequences, Stephanie Ross, "Gardens, nature, Pleasure,

2.

 

The Aesthetics of Human...    13 On Aesthetically Appreci...           47 Urban Richness and the ...

            66 Cultivating an Urban Aes...           79 Walking the City   100 The Aesthetics of the Sh...            119 Deconstructing Disney ...            139 Neat Messy Clean            163 Domesticity Interior Dec... 175 The Aesthetics of Playti...           190 The Role of Aesthetics in...            203 The Pervasive Pastoral and          219 On Appreciating Agricul...          234 Gardens Nature Pleasure          252 The View from the Road...          272

Check the bib in Fisher’s env. aesthetics intro book proposal for more articles.

 

Brady, E., “Don’t Eat the Daisies: Disinterestedness and the Situated Aesthetic,” Environmental Values, 7:1, February 1998, 97-114.

 

 

Godlovitch, “Things Change: So Whither Sustainability?” Environmental Ethics 20 (fall 1998).

 

Jason Hanna (University of Colorado at Boulder), “Wonder, Science, and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature” ask John Fisher jason.hanna@colorado.edu

 

Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty, ed. by A. Carlson and S. Lintott (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008).

 

Articles by and "Adjudicating the Debate Over Two Models of Nature Appreciation," Journal of Aesthetic Education, 2004; 38 (3), 52-72.

 

Sheila Lintott "Toward Eco-Friendly Aesthetics," Environmental Ethics 28,1 (Spring 2006): 57-76.

Sheila Lintott Adjudicating the Debate Over Two Models of Nature Appreciation

 The Journal of Aesthetic Education 38.3 (2004) 52-72

 

Sheila Lintott, Ethically Evaluating Land Art and Fisher Reply (env art)

 

Cynthia Freeland, Art and Moral Knowledge Philosophical Topics 25, 1 Spring 1997 11-36

Dan Jacobson 1996, “Sir Philip Sidney’s Dilemma: On the Ethical Function of Narrative, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54: 327-36.

 

Daniel Jacobson in praise of immoral art Phil Topics XXV 1 spring 1994

 

Haig Khatchadourian, 1982 “Natural Beauty and the Art of Living,” Journal of Aesthetic Education 16 1, 95-98.

 

 

Dickie, George, "Reply to Noël Carroll", Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55: 3

 

The Aesthetics of Agricultural Landscapes and the Relationship between Humans and Nature

Emily Brady A1 Ethics, Place & Environment

             Publisher:      Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group

             Issue: Volume 9, Number 1 / March 2006

A1 Institute of Geography, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

Abstract:

The continuum between nature and artefact is occupied by objects and environments that embody a relationship between natural processes and human activity. In this paper, I explore the relationship that emerges through human interaction with the land in the generation and aesthetic appreciation of industrial farming in contrast to more traditional agricultural practices. I consider the concept of a dialectical relationship and develop it in order to characterise the distinctive synthesising activity of humans and nature which underlies cultivated environments. I argue that a more harmonious relationship, and greater aesthetic value, may be located within traditional farming landscapes. This position is supported and illustrated through a discussion of two agricultural practices in the UK, hedge-laying and stonewalling.

 

Marianne O’Brien, “the Aesthetic Significance of Nature’s Otherness,” Environmental Values 15, 1 Feb 2006: pp. 99-11

            Refers to another paper in Env. Values on nature’s otherness I need to read.

 

Fisher paper

 

Jason’s History of Art, 7th ed.

 

Jonathan Maskit, Towards A Post-Industrial Environmental Aesthetics” Lecture at Denison spring 2006.

 

Marcia Eaton, in Merit, Aesthetic and Ethical had chapter on “Aesthetics and Ethics in the Environment”

 

Eaton, Marcia, (1992). “Integrating the Aesthetic and the Moral, ” Philosophical Studies 67: 3, pp. 219-240. John says probably discuss mushroom clouds I have.

 

Beardsley “The Aesthetic Point of View” Beardsley, M.: "The aesthetic point of view," reprinted in The Aesthetic Point of View: Selected Essays, ed. Michael J. Wreen and Donald M. Callen (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1982), pp. 15-34.

 

Patricia Matthews “Scientific Knowledge and the Aes App of Nature,” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2002) 37-48. I have.

Patricia Matthews, Aesthetic Appreciation of Art and Nature, British Journal of Aesthetics 41,4 October 2001

 

Glenn Parsons “Is the Aesthetic appreciation of Nature Objective?” I have

Don Crawford on above: “Parsons on the Objectivity of the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature”

 

Stan Godlovitch, “Aesthetic Protectionism,” Journal of Applied Philosophy 6,2 1989 pp. 171-181 I have.

 

Environmental experience: Beyond Aesthetic Subjectivism and objectivism, Veikko Rantalla, Thinkmount working paper serioes on Philosophy of conservation (I have)

 

Robert Stecker, “The Correct and the Appropriate in the Appreciation of Nature, The British Journal of Aesthetics 37: 1997: 393-403.

 

Robert Stecker, Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005), pp. 27-28.

 

David Ferer (sp?), ‘Aes App in the artworld and natural world” Env. Values 12 3-28, 2003.

 

 

Loftis’ review of Carlson and Berleant’s book.

 

Stan Godlovitch “Offending against nature,” Env. Values 7, 1998

 

Marcia Eation, “Morality and Aesthetics: Contemporary Aesthetics and Ethics,” in Encyclopedia of aesthetics / editor in chief, Michael Kelly. New York : Oxford University Press, 1998. Need to read

 

YiFuTan, Topophilia: A study of Env. Perception, Attitudes and Value Prentice Hall 1974.

Hepburn, Ronald 1984 Wonder and other Essays, includes Nature in the Light of Art, p. 47 where he says some parts of nature may be “irremediably inexpressive, unredeemably characterless, and aesthetically null”.

 

S. Godlovitch, "Evaluating Nature Aesthetically" Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56, 2 (1998): 113-25. I have Against positive aes: Just s there are rotten violinists, so there must be pathetic creeks; just as there is pulp fiction, so there must be junk species; just as there are forgettable means, so there must be inconsequential forests.”

 

Cheryl Foster, "Aesthetic Disillusionment: Environment, Ethics, Art" Env. Values 1,3 1992. (I have)

 

“Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value” By Matthew Kieran, University of Leeds (February 2006) Philosophy Compass 

Knowing Art: Essays in Aesthetics and Epistemology, ed. By Matthew Kieran and others (Springer, 2007) Editors’ Acknowledgments.- Notes on Contributors.- Introduction; M. Kieran and D. McIver Lopes.- Part I Knowing Through Art.- 1 Knowing Content in the Visual Arts; K. Lehrer.- 2 Pictures, Knowledge, and Power: The Case of T. J. Clark; D. Matravers.- 3 Narrating the Truth (More or Less); S. Friend.- 4 Fiction and Psychological Insight; K. Stock.- 5 Art and Modal Knowledge; D. Stokes.- 6 Charley’s World: Narratives of Aesthetic Experience; P. Goldie.- Part II Knowing about Art.- 7 Really Bad Taste; J. Prinz.- 8 Solving the Puzzle of Aesthetic Testimony; A. Meskin.- 9 Critical Compatibilism; J. Shelley.- 10 Critical Reasoning and Critical Perception; R. Hopkins. References.

 

Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art Edited by: Matthew Kieran (Blackwell, 2005)

Acknowledgments

List of Contributors

A Conceptual Map of Issues in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: Matthew Kieran

How are artistic experience and value inter-related?

1. Aesthetic Empiricism and the Challenge of Fakes and Ready-mades : Gordon Graham

2. Against Enlightened Empiricism: David Davies

References and Suggested Reading

In what does true beauty consist?

3. Beauty and Ugliness in and out of Context : Marcia Muelder Eaton

4. Terrible Beauties: Carolyn Korsmeyer

References and Suggested Reading

What is the nature of aesthetic experience?

5. Aesthetic Experience: A Question of Content: Noël Carroll

6. The Aesthetic State of Mind : Gary Iseminger

References and Suggested Reading

Should we value works as art for what we can learn from them?

7. Art and Cognition: Berys Gaut

8. Cognitive Values in the Arts: Marking the Boundaries: Peter Lamarque

References and Suggested Reading

How do pictures represent?

9. The Speaking Image: Visual Communication and the Nature of Depiction: Robert Hopkins

10. The Domain of Depiction : Dominic McIver Lopes

References and Suggested Reading

What constitutes artistic expression?

11. Artistic Expression and the Hard Case of Pure Music: Stephen Davies

12. Musical Expressiveness as Hearability-As-Expression : Jerrold Levinson

References and Suggested Reading

In what ways is the imagination involved in engaging with art works?

13. Anne Brontë and the Uses of Imagination: Gregory Currie

14. Imagine That! : Jonathan M. Weinberg and Aaron Meskin

References and Suggested Reading

Can emotional responses to fiction be genuine and rational?

15. Genuine Rational Fictional Emotions: Tamar Szabó Gendler and Karson Kovakovich

16. The Challenge of Irrationalism and How Not To Meet It: Derek Matravers

References and Suggested Reading

Is artistic intention relevant to the interpretation of art works?

17. Interpretation and the Problem of the Relevant Intention: Robert Stecker

18. Art, Meaning, and Artist's Meaning: Daniel O. Nathan

References and Suggested Reading

Are there general principles of evaluation?

19. There are no Aesthetic Principles: Alan H. Goldman

20. Iron, Leather and Critical Principles: George Dickie

References and Suggested Reading

What are the relations between the moral and aesthetic values of art?

21. Artistic Value and Opportunistic Moralism: Eileen John

22. Ethical Criticism and The Vice of Moderation: Daniel Jacobson

References and Suggested Reading

Index

 

End Aes stuff I need to read:

 

For Possible Use in Class (Newspaper articles? And others)

 

Letter to a Christian Nation, Sam Harris # 112 pages # Publisher: Knopf (September 19, 2006)

# Language: English # ISBN-10: 0307265773

 

Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion, which has been riding high on the New York Times and Amazon best seller lists.

1. Sam Harris published The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the End of Reason, which focused public attention on the dangers of religious extremism and sold a quarter-million copies. Now he is back with Letter to a Christian Nation, a polemical blast at religion as the source of most of humankind's misery.

Daniel Dennett, the dean of the new wave of nontheists and director of Tufts University's Cognitive Studies Center, whose Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon

 

 

Green to the Gills, By PAUL GREENBERG On turning the oceans into a domesticated sphere of food animals. Published: June 18, 2006, NY Times Magazine

 

 

David Crocker, Ethics of Global Development: Agency, Capability and Deliberative Democracy: Intro to his forthcoming book. In Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly, 26, ½ Winter Spring 2006).

 

Wal-Mart Eyes Organic Foods The New York Times By MELANIE WARNER summer 2006 http://cornucopia.org/index.php/123 

 

End Possible Use in Class

 

 

 

NEW NON AES

 

Alexander Rosenberg, Philosophy of Social Science Westview Press July 2997: eclipse of behaviorisim in psychology, problems of functionalism in social science appeal to biology and Darwinian thinking, nativists versus standard social sci model (nurture over nature), feminism in human sciences

Intrinsic Value and the Notion of a Life. Levinson, Jerrold1 jl32@umail.umd.edu

Journal of Aesthetics & Art Criticism; Fall2004, Vol. 62 Issue 4, p319-329, 11p I’ve scanned this article

 

 

Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy I have

Edited by Nina Witoszek and Andrew Brennan 1999 includes esssay by Guha: Rad Am Env revisited; A.J. Ayer on NaessFeyerabend on Naess, French’s against biospherical egalitarianism and naess response and Callicott on Naess versus French, Warrwick Fox’s article and Naess and his interchange, Peter Reed, Plumwood, sale’s article, letter to Foreman, Norton on Naess on Wolf policies

 

 

The Idea of a Political Liberalism: Essays on Rawls Edited by Victoria Davion and Clark Wolf 2000 0-8476-8793-7 I have good articles by important philosophers.

 

Can Ethics Provide Answers?

And Other Essays in Moral Philosophy I have

By James Rachels 1996 0-8476-8347-8

978-0-8476-8347-5 $84.00 $71.40 Cloth

1996 0-8476-8348-6

Includes moral philo as a subersive activity, active and passive euthanasia, killing, letting die and vlaue of life, god and moral autonomy, why privacy is important, reflections on idea of equality, what people deserve, coping with prejeice, morality, parents and children, when Philosophers hsould shoot from the hitp

 

 

Same Sex: Debating the Ethics, Science, and Culture of Homosexuality Edited by John Corvino 1997 I have Cladia Card, Against Marriage, Pentagon’s Ban, Don’t ask don’t tell, Mohr: The case for outing; how domestic partnerships and gam marriage threaten the family

 

 

Ethical Dimensions of Global Development (I have), good chapters on retribution and reconciliation, complicity in mass violence, female genital mutilation, child labor, Daly on Globalization. Edited by Verna V. Gehring I have Introduction by William Galston 2006 Book looks quite good.

 

 

Putting Humans First: Why We Are Nature's Favorite I have By Tibor R. Machan 2004

 

 

 

Environmental Ethics for a Postcolonial World By Deane Curtin 2005 0-7425-2578-3 I have Looks somewhat interesting, nice style of writing. About colonolization and ee; chapter on population, Ghandi and community development, Aldo Leopold’s vision..., clean clothers/clean conscience

 

 

Making Threats:

Biofears and Environmental Anxieties

Edited by Betsy Hartmann, Banu Subramaniam, and Charles Zerner 2005 0-7425-4906-2

978-0-7425-4906-7 $80.00 $68.00 Cloth I have

includes decoding the debate on “frankenfood”

“reflections on the rhetoric of biological invasions”

articles on bioterrorism

 

 

 

So Glorious a Landscape:

Nature and the Environment in American History and Culture

By Chris J. Magoc 2001 0-8420-2695-9 I have

978-0-8420-2695-6 $72.00 $61.20 Cloth

2001 0-8420-2696-7

978-0-8420-2696-3 $21.95 $18.66 Paper

 

 

5 Andrew Light and Jonathan Smith, Philosophy and Geography I: Space, Place and Environmental Ethics, (I Have) December 1996 Rowman and Littlefield, with Zev Trachtenberg’s “The Takings Clause and the Meaning of Land,” Paden on “wilderness management,” King on Biocentrism not an alternative to anthro. Philosophy and Geography I: Space, Place, and Environmental Ethics Edited by Andrew Light and Jonathan M. Smith 1996 0-8476-8221-8 I have includes Katz “nature’s presence: Reflections on Healing and Domination, King “Critical Refelctions on Biocentric ee: is it an alternative to anthro?

 

5

Community Matters:

Challenges to Civic Engagement in the 21st Century

Edited by Verna V. Gehring

Introduction by William A. Galston 2005 0-7425-4959-3

978-0-7425-4959-3 $49.00 $41.65 Cloth

2005 0-7425-4960-7

978-0-7425-4960-9 $17.95 $15.26 Paper I have

 

 

 

 

5 good for library

The Road More Traveled:

Why the Congestion Crisis Matters More Than You Think, and What We Can Do About It

By Ted Balaker and Sam Staley 2006 0-7425-5112-1

978-0-7425-5112-1 $24.95 $21.21 I have?

 

 

Theorizing Backlash:

Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism

Edited by Anita M. Superson and Ann E. Cudd 2002 0-7425-1373-4

978-0-7425-1373-0 $88.00 $74.80 Cloth

2002 0-7425-1374-2

978-0-7425-1374-7 $27.95 $23.76 Paper

 

 

So Glorious a Landscape: Nature and the Environment in American History and Culture By Chris J. Magoc I have, includes Ron Arnold on Wise Use, Brower on Dionsaur National Monumnet, jeffers on passenger pigeons

 

 

Community Matters:

Challenges to Civic Engagement in the 21st Century

Edited by Verna V. Gehring

Introduction by William A. Galston 2005 0-7425-4959-3

978-0-7425-4959-3 $49.00 $41.65 Cloth

2005 0-7425-4960-7

978-0-7425-4960-9 $17.95 $15.26 Paper

 

 

0

Philosophy and Geography II:

The Production of Public Space

Edited by Andrew Light and Jonathan M. Smith 1997 0-8476-8809-7

978-0-8476-8809-8 $34.95 $29.71 Cloth

1997 0-8476-8810-0

978-0-8476-8810-4 $34.95 $29.71

 

 

4

Philosophy and Geography III:

Philosophies of Place

Edited by Andrew Light and Jonathan M. Smith 1998 0-8476-9094-6

978-0-8476-9094-7 $99.00 $84.15 Cloth

1998 0-8476-9095-4

978-0-8476-9095-4 $36.9

 

 

 

4

Community in the Digital Age:

Philosophy and Practice

Edited by Andrew Feenberg and Darin Barney 2004 0-7425-2958-4

978-0-7425-2958-8 $87.00 $73.95 Cloth

2004 0-7425-2959-2

978-0-7425-2959-5 $36.95 $31.41 Paper

 

 

 

 

4

Universal Human Rights:

Moral Order in a Divided World

Edited by David A. Reidy and Mortimer N. S. Sellers 2005 0-7425-4860-0

978-0-7425-4860-2 $75.00 $63.75 Cloth

2005 0-7425-4861-9

978-0-7425-4861-9 $27.95 $23.76 Paper

            Includes Rights in Extremis: * Is Terrorism Ever Morally Permissible? An Inquiry into the Right to Life Stephen Nathanson

 

2

The Intellectual Commons:

Toward an Ecology of Intellectual Property

By Henry C. Mitchell 2005 0-7391-0948-0

978-0-7391-0948-9 $70.00 $59.50 Cloth

2005 0-7391-1342-9

978-0-7391-1342-4 $26.95 $22.91

 

3

Transformations of Urban and Suburban Landscapes:

Perspectives from Philosophy, Geography, and Architecture

Edited and Introduced by Gary Backhaus and John Murungi 2002 0-7391-0335-0

978-0-7391-0335-7 $84.00 $71.40 Cloth

2002 0-7391-0336-9

978-0-7391-0336-4 $28.00 $23.80

Includes Walking in the Urban Environment: Pedestrian Practices and Peripatetic Politics

David Macauley

 

3

American Heat:

Ethical Problems with the United States' Response to Global Warming

By Donald A. Brown

Foreword by Tim Weiskel 2002 0-7425-1295-9

978-0-7425-1295-5 $88.00 $74.80 Cloth

2002 0-7425-1296-7

978-0-7425-1296-2 $29.95 $25.46 Pap

 

 

4

Respecting Persons in Theory and Practice:

Essays on Moral and Political Philosophy

By Jan Narveson 2002 0-7425-1329-7

978-0-7425-1329-7 $88.00 $74.80 Cloth

2002 0-7425-1330-0

978-0-7425-1330-3 $27.95 $ $23.76

 

 

 

 

 

4

Racist Symbols & Reparations:

Philosophical Reflections on Vestiges of the American Civil War

By George Schedler 1998 0-8476-8675-2

978-0-8476-8675-9 $81.00 $68.85 Cloth

1998 0-8476-8676-0

978-0-8476-8676-6 $24.95 $21.21

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Philosophy and the Problems of Work:

A Reader

Edited by Kory Schaff 2001 0-7425-0794-7

978-0-7425-0794-4 $94.00 $79.90 Cloth

2001 0-7425-0795-5

978-0-7425-0795-1 $34....

 

 

?

Upstate Arcadia:

Landscape, Aesthetics, and the Triumph of Social Differentiation in America

By Peter J. Hugill 1995 0-8476-7855-5

978-0-8476-7855-6 $85.50 $72.67 Cloth

1995 0-8476-7856-3

978-0-8476-7856-3 $32.95 $28.01 Paper

 

 

 

 

 

3

Shades of Green:

Environment Activism Around the Globe

Edited by Christof Mauch, Nathan Stoltzfus, and Douglas R. Weiner 2006 0-7425-4647-0

978-0-7425-4647-9 $75.00 $63.75 Cloth

2006 0-7425-4648-9

978-0-7425-4648-6 $24.95 $21.21

 

 

 

4

Who Owns the Environment?

Edited by Peter J. Hill and Roger E. Meiners 1998 0-8476-9081-4

978-0-8476-9081-7 $99.00 $84.15 Cloth

1998 0-8476-9082-2

978-0-8476-9082-4 $41.95 $35.66 Pape

 

 

3

Hooked on Growth:

Economic Addictions and the Environment

By Douglas E. Booth 2004 0-7425-2717-4

978-0-7425-2717-1 $79.00 $67.15 Cloth

2004 0-7425-2718-2

978-0-7425-2718-8 $27.95 $23.76

 

3

The Agony of an American Wilderness:

Loggers, Environmentalists, and the Struggle for Control of a Forgotten Forest

By Samuel A. MacDonald 2005 0-7425-4157-6

978-0-7425-4157-3 $72.00 $61.20 Cloth

2005 0-7425-4158-4

978-0-7425-4158-0 $22.95 $19

 

2

American Green:

Class, Crisis, and the Deployment of Nature in Central Park, Yosemite, and Yellowstone

By Stephen A. Germic 2001 0-7391-0228-1

978-0-7391-0228-2 $68.00 $57.80 Cloth

2001 0-7391-0229-X

978-0-7391-0229-9 $24.00 $20.40

 

2

Cattle:

An Informal Social History

Laurie Winn Carlson 2001 1-56663-388-5

978-1-56663-388-8 $27.50 $23.38 Cloth

2002 1-56663-455-5

978-1-56663-455-7 $19.90 $16.91

 

3

The Ethics of Waste:

How We Relate to Rubbish

By Gay Hawkins 2005 0-7425-3012-4

978-0-7425-3012-6 $69.00 $58.65 Cloth

2005 0-7425-3013-2

978-0-7425-3013-3 $23.95 $20.36 Paper

 

4

A Grain of Truth:

The Media, the Public, and Biotechnology

By Susanna Hornig Priest 2001 0-7425-0947-8

978-0-7425-0947-4 $88.00 $74.80 Cloth

2001 0-7425-0948-6

978-0-7425-0948-1 $22.95 $19.51

 

2

Inventing Nature:

Ecological Restoration by Public Experiments

By Matthias Gross

 

 

4 good for library

Values and Objectivity in Science:

The Current Controversy about Transgenic Crops

By Hugh Lacey 2005 0-7391-1045-4

978-0-7391-1045-4 $70.00 $59.50 Cloth

2005 0-7391-1141-8

978-0-7391-1141-3 $27.95 $23.76

 

Hauser, Marc (2006), Moral Minds: How Nature Designed our Universal

Sense of Right and Wrong, Harper Collins.

 

 

 

What Is a Healthy Forest?: Definitions, Rationales, and the Lifeworld p. 99 William A. Warren, Society & Natural Resources An International Journal, Volume 20 Issue 2 2007

 

The Role of Ethical Judgments Related to Wildlife Fertility Control T. Bruce Lauber; Barbara A. Knuth; James A. Tantillo; Paul D. Curtis, Society & Natural Resources An International Journal, Volume 20 Issue 2 2007

 

An Owner's Manual to "Ownership": A Reply to Lachapelle and McCool 187-192 Authors: Robert Manning; Clare Ginger Society & Natural Resources An International Journal, Volume 20 Issue 2 2007

 

Claiming Ownership: A Response to Manning and Ginger 193 - 197 Authors: Paul R. Lachapelle; Stephen F. McCool Society & Natural Resources An International Journal, Volume 20 Issue 2 2007

 

 

Environmental Values (Routledge Introductions to Environment) (Hardcover)

by John O'neill Author(s) - Alan Holland, Andrew Light, John O'Neill Series: Routledge Introductions to Environment List Price: $135.00 ISBN: 9780415145084 ISBN-10: 0415145082

Publisher: Routledge Publication Date: 07/12/2007 Pages: 224 We live in a world confronted by mounting environmental problems. We read of increasing global deforestation and desertification, loss of species diversity, pollution and global warming. In everyday life people mourn the loss of valued landscapes and urban spaces. Underlying these problems are conflicting priorities and values. Yet dominant approaches to policy making seem ill-equipped to capture the various ways in which the environment matters to us. Environmental Values introduces readers to these issues by presenting, and then challenging, two dominant approaches to environmental decision-making, one from environmental economics, the other from environmental philosophy. The authors present a sustained case for questioning the underlying ethical theories of both of these traditions. They defend a pluralistic alternative rooted in the rich everyday relations of humans to the environments they inhabit, providing a path for integrating human needs with environmental protection through an understanding of the narrative and history of particular places. The book examines the implications of this approach for policy issues such as biodiversity conservation and sustainability.

 

The book is written in a clear and accessible style for an interdisciplinary audience. It will be ideal for student use in environmental courses in geography, economics, philosophy, politics and sociology. It will also be of wider interest to policy makers and the concerned general reader.

 

Environment and Philosophy Author(s) - Vernon Pratt with Emily Brady Jane Howarth,

Series: Routledge Introductions to Environment List Price: $33.95 ISBN: 9780415145114

ISBN-10: 0415145112 Publisher: RoutledgePublication Date: 10/28/1999 Environment and Philosophy provides an accessible introduction to the radical challenges that environmentalism poses to concepts that have become almost second nature in the modern world, including

* the ideas of science and objectivity

* the conventional placement of the human being within the environment

* the individualism of convential Modern thought

Written in an accessible way for those without a background in philosophy, this text examines ways of thinking about ourselves, nature and our relationship with nature. It offers an introduction to the phenomenological perspective on environmental issues, and also to the questions of what natural beauty is for the threat to it to play a role in practical decision-making.

 

John Nolt, “The Move from Good to Ought in Env. Ethics<“ Env. Ethics 28,4 Winter 2006.

'Symposium: Ecosocialist-Ecofeminist Dialogues', Capitalism Nature Socialism, 2006, Vol. 17, No. 4, 32-124.

 

The Earthscan Reader in Environmental Values, Edited by Linda Kalof and Terre Satterfield June 2005 Contents: Introduction • Economic Themes in Environmental Values • Philosophical and Ethical Themes in Environmental Values • Anthropological and Sociological Themes in Environmental Values • Judgement and Decision Making Themes in Environmental Values • Bibliography, Index

 

Simon Hailwood, How to be a Green Liberal: Nature, Value, and Liberal Philosophy (McGill-queens Univ. Press, 2004)

 

Simon Hailwood, 1999, “Towards a Liberal Environment” Journal of Applied Philosophy 16: 271-81: has a section arguing that nature’s otherness has value. Nature as other

 

The Value of Nature's Otherness Simon A. Hailwood Environmental Values 9(2000): 353-372

 

Christopher Belshaw, Environmental Philosophy: Reason, Nature and Human Concern (Acumen, 200l) Has a chapter on beauty

 

Kathryn Paxton George, “A Paradox of Ethical Vegetarianism,” in Food for Thought, Steve Sapontzis, ed., Prometheus, 2003.

Steve Sapontzis, ed., Prometheus, 2003 Food for thought : the debate over eating meat : C of C Book Stacks; TX392 .F63 2004

 

Colette Palamar, “Restorashyn: Ecofeminist Restoration,” in Env. Ethics Fall 2006.

 

Patrick Impero Wilson, Forward to the Past: Wolves in the Northern Rockies and the Future of ESA Politics               Society & Natural Resources            Issue: Volume 19, Number 9 / October 2006

             Pages:            863 - 870

Same as above: A Review of: "Ott, Riki. Sound Truth and Corporate Myths: The Legacy of Exxon Valdez Oil Spill.": Cordova, AL: Dragonfly Sisters Press, 2005. 561, pp. $24.95 (paper). ISBN 0-9645-22667.

1.p. 871

John K. Thomas

 

 

 

 

Facts not Fear: Parents Guide to Teaching Children about the Environment, by Jane Shaw of Perc, Bozeman

 

Georgiana Kirkham, “Playing God and Vexing Nature” A cultural Perspective, Environmental Values 15 2006 173-95

 

Thomas Heyd, “Thinking through Botanic Gardens,” Environmental Values 15 2006, 197-212

 

Derek Turner, “Monkeywrenching, Perverse Incentives, and Ecodefence,” Environmental Values, 15 2006 213-32.

 

The Philosopher's Dog by Raimond Gaita 224pp, Routledge, £14.99 on animal minds

To: hettingern@cofc.edu

Subject: Ethics, Place & Environment - New Issue Alert

Dear SARA registrant,

Volume 9 Number 1/March 2006 of Ethics, Place & Environment is now available on the http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1366879X.asp.

To unsubscribe from this alert please visit: http://www.tandf.co.uk/sara.

The following URL will take you directly to the issue:

http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=L05T26788046

This issue contains:

The Aesthetics of Agricultural Landscapes and the Relationship between Humans and Nature

p. 1

Emily Brady

URL of article: http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=L5038901884P56QJ

Biocomplexity in the Big Thicket

p. 21

J. Baird Callicott, Miguel Acevedo, Pete Gunter, Paul Harcombe, Christopher Lindquist, Michael Monticino1

URL of article:http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=K843758G3N580250

Reconsidering Wilderness: Prospective Ethics for Nature, Technology, and Society

p. 47

David Havlick

URL of article: ttp://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=N47K242762432J44

Exotic Invasions, Nativism, and Ecological Restoration: On the Persistence of a Contentious Debate

p. 63

William O'Brien

URL of article: http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=L6065HN2T5558376

 

Science and Engineering Ethics ― Scope of the Journal

(Print: ISSN 1353-3452; Online: ISSN 1471-5546)

Web: http;//www.opragen.co.uk: for searchable contents and abstracts

and subscription information

Science and Engineering Ethics is a peer reviewed quarterly journal

launched in January 1995 that publishes research papers, comment pieces

and reviews on a broad range of ethical issues relating to the practice

of science and engineering, the education of scientists and engineers,

and the effects of innovations on society. Contributors to the journal

represent a broad range of disciplines including scientists from

varying disciplines, engineers, healthcare professionals, philosophers,

lawyers, managers of public policy and science, psychologists, social

scientists, clerics and teachers/researchers. An international

editorial board also reflects this broad range of interest. The journal

is available to institutional and personal subscribers in print and/or

online formats.

A list of some areas explored generally in the journal include:

• Science and technology in the development of public policy

• Professional codes of conduct and practice

• Computer ethics

• Ethics and the new biotechnologies

• Biomedical Ethics

• Ethics and Social Responsibility in Engineering and Technology

• Animal and human subjects in research

• Legal matters and professional competence

• Risk assessment in public health, safety and the environment

• Scientific freedom and responsibility

• Conflicts of Interest

• Whistleblowing

• Educational programs: curricula, format, strategies

• Responsibilities of mentors, referees and external examiners

• Project evaluation and peer review

• Authorship, intellectual property

• Bias in research: data selection, data manipulation, data

management

• Allegations of misconduct; fabrication, falsification,

plagiarism                                                                                                                   

 

 

Great web resource on punishment and death penalty: http://ethics.acusd.edu/Applied/deathpenalty/

 

 

Kaufman, Frederik. "Machines, Sentience, and the Scope of Morality." Environmental Ethics 16(1994):57-70. Environmental philosophers are often concerned to show that non-sentient things, such as plants or ecosystems, have interests and therefore are appropriate objects of moral concern. They deny that mentality is a necessary condition for having interests. Yet they also deny that they are committed to recognizing interests in things like machines. I argue that either machines have interests (and hence moral standing) too or mentality is a necessary condition for inclusion within the purview of morality. I go on to argue that the aspect of mentality necessary for having interests is more complicated than mere sentience. Kaufman is in the department of Philosophy and Religion, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY. (EE)

 

Claudia Mills, “Are There Morally Problematic Reasons for Having Childern?” (E.g. for spare parts) Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly 25,4 (Fall 2005), p. 2. I have.

 

Roger Scruton On Hunting (1998)

Roger Scruton, Animal Rights and Wrongs (1996, third edn. 2000): Animals were once regarded as things, placed on earth for our use and enjoyment, to be treated according to our convenience. This is no longer so. All thinking people now recognise the gulf that exists between sentient and non-sentient beings and almost all recognise that we have no God-given right to ignore the suffering that we cause just because the victim belongs to some other species. Moral sentiment has a natural tendency to seek expression in law. The argument of this book should therefore be understood as exploring the moral background to a legal question. Against a background of public concern about issues ranging from BSE to the export of veal calves and from fox hunting to vivisection, this acclaimed book brings a much-needed clarity to complex issues and provides a superb example of how to think about the contemporary moral questions.)

 

Roger Scruton, What is the Precautionary Principle? This essay traces the origins of the Principle and its application. It explores whether it is effective in reducing risk. The Cult of Precaution was published in The National Interest, 30 June 2004; Summer 2004, pp. 148-154. PP.doc

The theme of the Precautionary Principle was considered in The Risk of Freedom Briefing edited by Roger Scruton

 

Roger Scruton is a firm champion of the small farm and the family farmers, and maintains links with the FFA, the Countryside Alliance, and other movements devoted to ecological and agricultural causes.

 

Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice, Oxford (2002/2005) in library

Eric Katz, Death by Design: Science, Technology and Engineering in the Holocaust (New York: Person Longman, 2006)

 

http://commhum.mccneb.edu/PHILOS/techessay.htm

Essays on the Philosophy of Technology I

Copyright © 2000-2001 by Frank Edler

New !!: The debate over Technorealism versus Techno-Luddism and Techno-utopianism. Click here for an overview of Technorealism.

New !!: Kirkpatrick Sale, Howard Rheingold, Mark Stahlman, Steve Silberman, and Brooke Shelby Biggs discuss the question: What is it that you fear most about digital technology's effects?

                                  

 

 

Albert Borgman, The Moral Complexion of Consumption, Journal of Consumer Research 26 March 2000: 418-422.

William MCDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the way we make things Northpoint press 2002.

 

 

 

Gary Steiner, anthropocentrism and its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy

 

Richard Shearman, Can we be friends of the earth? Env. Values 14, 4 2005

 

 

Christopher Preston, ed., Ethics and Environment, Special Issue on Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy Vol 10, 2 Autumn 2005

 

Redclift, Michael, ed. Sustainability: Life Chances and Livelihoods. London: Routledge, 1999. Review by Inge Ropke Environmental Values 10(2001):422. (EV)

Redclift, Michael, "Sustainable Development: Needs, Values, Rights." Environmental Values Vol.2 No.1(1993):3-20. ABSTRACT: `Sustainable development' is analyzed as a product of the Modernist tradition, in which social criticism and understanding are legitimized against a background of evolutionary theory, scientific specialization, and rapid economic growth. Within this tradition, sustainable development emphasizes the need to live within ecological limits, but allows the retention of an essentially optimistic idea of progress. However, the inherent contradictions in the concept of sustainable development may lead to rejection of the Modernist view in favour of a new vision of the world in which the authority of science and technology is questioned and more emphasis is placed on cultural diversity. KEYWORDS: Development, environment, modernism, needs, post-modernism, sustainability, values. Wye College, University of London, Near Ashford, Kent TN25 5AH, UK.

 

 

"Arne Naess, His Life and Work," guest edited by Bill Devall and Alan Drengson. Go to http://trumpeter.athabascau.ca/ and click the "Current Issue" button. The series is divided into two parts. Part One: Arne Naess, His Life and Work, is divided into four sections. Section 3, "History, Education, and Practical Applications," and Section 4, "Local Grounds and Personal Mythologies," are included in this issue. Sections 1 and 2 of Part One were published in the previous issue (Vol. 21, No. 2.) and can be found at the above URL under the "Archives" button. This issue of the Trumpeter concludes Part One of the series. Part Two: Arne Naess, Life and Work, with Reflections by Others, is currently being prepared for publication. It will contain further Works by Arne Naess and works on him by others.

 

Bryan Norton's -SUSTAINABILITY: A PHILOSOPHY OF ADAPTIVE ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

 

Old man mountain restoration issue in New Hampshire.

 

Animal Passions and Beastly Virtues Reflections on Redecorating Nature by Marc Bekoff, foreword by Jane Goodall says on science and ethics of research into animal behavior Temple 2005.

 

New website: The Environmental History Home-site An new website has been launched with the aim to provide insights and resources of world environmental history, but with a focus on
northwestern Europe. http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/k.j.w.oosthoek/index.html

 

 

Cora Diamond Does stuff on animals count? See two essays especially in her "The

Realistic Spirit": Ch. 13, "Eating Meat & Eating People," and Ch. 14,

"Experimenting on Animals." Ch. 11, "Anything but Argument?" is

interesting methodologically, and her main example in it is arguing

about animal rights. She also sent me a new piece, unpublished, I

think, on Singer & Coetzee on animals

 

Whole issue of the Trumpter on Arne Naess: http://trumpeter.athabascau.ca/content/v21.2/

 

 

Chronicle of Higher Education about Feb 2006

The Moral Status of Animals

By MARTHA C. NUSSBAUM

In 55 BC, the Roman leader Pompey staged a combat between humans and elephants. Surrounded in the arena, the animals perceived that they had no hope of escape. According to Pliny, they then "entreated the crowd, trying to win its compassion with indescribable gestures, bewailing their plight with a sort of lamentation." The audience, moved to pity and anger by their plight, rose to curse Pompey — feeling, wrote Cicero, that the elephants had a relation of commonality (societas) with the human race.

 

July 15, 2004 Discussing Disgust: On the folly of gross-out public policy. An interview with Martha Nussbaum http://reason.com/interviews/nussbaum.shtml

About her book Hiding from Humanity by Martha C. Nussbaum

 

A Response to Martha Nussbaum: Peter Singer

Reply to Martha Nussbaum, 'Justice for Non-Human Animals', The Tanner Lectures on Human Values, November 13, 2002 http://www.utilitarian.net/singer/by/20021113.htm

 

Animal Rights: Current Debates New Directions Edited by Cass R. Sunstein and Martha Nussbaum Oxford University Press Due/Published April 2004, 352 pages, cloth

ISBN 0195152174 : Essays include, “Introduction: What Are Animal Rights?,” Cass Sunstein; “Animal Rights, One Step at a Time,” Steven M. Wise; “Animal Rights: Legal, Philosophical and Pragmatic Perspectives,” Richard A. Posner; “Ethics beyond Instincts: A Response to Richard Posner,” Peter Singer; “Eating Meat and Eating People,” Cora Diamond; “Animals as Objects, or Subjects, of Rights,” Richard A. Epstein; “Can Animals Sue?,” Cass Sunstein; “Of Mice and Men: A Feminist Fragment on Animal Rights,” Catharine A. Mackinnon; “Beyond ‘Compassion and Humanity’: Justice for Nonhuman Animals,” Martha Nussbaum; “Animals – Property or Persons?,” Gary L. Francione; “Drawing Lines,” James Rachels; “All Animals Are Not Equal: The Interface between Scientific Knowledge and Legislation for Animal Rights,” Lesley J. Rogers and Gisela Kaplan; “Foxes in the Hen House: Animals, Agribusiness and the Law: A Modern American Fable,” David J. Wolfson and Mariann Sullivan.

 

Transhumanism: http://users.aol.com/gburch3/thext.html

Transhumanists advocate continuing the progressive transformation of the human condition, especially (but not exclusively) through technological means. Some guy named Burch writes this material. We know nothing about who he is or how thoughtful he is.

 

  ExI Project No. 2 - THE WORLD'S MOST DANGEROUS IDEA http://www.extropy.org/

This book is an anthology of leading transhumanists. Each chapter opens with an interview with key figures as we resolve striking issues about the future. The title represents a constructive rebuttal to Francis Fukuyama, who recently pointed to transhumanism as the world?s most dangerous idea. The irony is that transhumanists, as proponents of determined, yet carefully considered, progress are helping to expand our options. A vastly greater danger is the controlling desire to stop progress on the basis of vague fears promoted by a few elite thinkers with a foot in the corridors of power (which includes Fukuyama as well as Leon Kass). At the same time, Fukuyama is exactly right: transhumanist ideas are dangerous; they pose a serious threat to the continued reign of age-old afflictions of humanity, including the deterioration of old age, the severely limited cognitive powers of biological brains, and the disturbed emotions thrown up over the course of our evolutionary emergence. To learn more about this book read on.

 

Journal of evolution and technology: A peer-reviewed electronic journal published by the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies ISSN 1541-0099, special issue on Religion and Transhumanism: Introducing a Conversation Religion & Transhumanism Issue (Vol. 14, Issue 2 - August 2005)

 

Religion and Transhumanism: Introducing a Conversation

Heidi Campbell

Department of Communication, Texas A&M University

hcampbe1@yahoo.co.uk

Mark Walker

Trinity College, University of Toronto

Department of Philosophy, McMaster University

mark@permanentend.org

 Journal of Evolution and Technology - Vol. 14 Issue 2 - April 2005

http://jetpress.org/volume14/specialissueintro.html

 Why a Dialogue between Transhumanism and Faith?

In broadest terms, transhumanism is the view that humans should (or should be permitted to) use technology to remake human nature (Bostrom, 2001, Walker, 2002b). It is believed that through stem cell technology, genetic engineering and nanotechnology the possibility exists that this century we might be able to greatly enhance the healthy life span of persons, increase intelligence, and some would argue, make ourselves happier, and more virtuous (Pierce, 1996; Walker, 2003; Hughes, 2004). Central to transhumanism is the re-contextualizing of humanity in terms of its technology; it represents a drive towards technological exploration into the enhancement of the human condition. In an era of increasing innovations in informational and biotechnologies, transhumanism presents a radical view of our future world: the merging of humanity with technology as the next stage of our human evolution—we have the opportunity to become something more than human.

 

Ethics and Sports Technology

Good website: http://www.fast.paisley.ac.uk/articles.html

 

Is Gene Doping Wrong? (2005)

Project Syndicate

by Dr Andy Miah [HTML, in various languages]

 

Genetically Modified Athletes. Why not? asks Andy Miah

Science and Public Affairs

by Dr Andy Miah [HTML, in various language]

 

Be Very Afraid: Cyborg Athletes, Transhuman Ideals, and Posthumanity (2003)

Journal of Evolution and Technology

by Dr Andy Miah [HTML]

 

Gene Doping: Sport, Values, and Bioethics (2003)

By Dr Andy Miah, n Glasa, J. (Ed.) The Ethics of Human Genetics. Strasburg, Council of Europe, pp.171-180.[PDF]

 

Catching up with Frankenrunner (2002)

By Dr Andy Miah, Sp!ke

 

Bioethics, Sport & the Genetically Enhanced Athlete (2002)

Journal of Medical Ethics & Bioethics, 9(3-4), 2-6.

by Andy Miah [PDF]

 

Technology in Sport - Three Ideal-typical views and their implications (2002) by Prof Sigmund Loland

 

Genetics, Law and Athletes' Rights (2001)

by Dr Andy Miah, Sports Law Bulletin [PDF]

 

Sports facing next problem after drug-takers - gene cheats (2001)

by Nick Morgan [HTML]

 

The Olympic Games and the Cyborg-Athlete: Any Room for Improvement? (2001)

By Dr Andy Miah, Proceedings of the 8th International Post-Graduate Seminar on Olympic Studies, International Olympic Academy, Athens, pp.264-277.

 

Where Cyborgs can be Heroes: Sport, Genes, and Fair Play (2001)

by Dr Andy Miah [HTML]

 

Sport and Technology (2001)

from Science Net [HTML]

 

Simulating Sport in Virtual Arenas (2001)

by Andy Miah [HTML]

 

Technology and Sport (2001)

by Greg Levine [HTML]

 

New Balls Please: Tennis, Technology, and the Changing Game (2000)

by Dr Andy Miah [PDF]

 

The Human Rights of the Genetically Engineered Athlete (2000)

By Dr Andy Miah, In Taylor, T. (Ed) How you play the Game: the contribution of sport to the protection of human rights,

University of Technology Sydney, pp.69-77 [PDF]

 

Climbing Upwards or Climbing Backwards? The Technological Metamorphoses of Climbing and Mountaineering (2000)

By Dr Andy Miah, In N. Messenger, W. Patterson, and D. Brook (Eds)

The Science of Climbing and Mountaineering. Human Kinetics Publishers, Chapter 27. [PDF]

 

Limits to Growth in Elite Sport: Some Ethical Considerations (1998)

by Gunnar Breivik [HTML]

 

The Record Dilemma (1998)

by Sigmund Loland [HTML]

 

 

FAST was created and is maintained by Dr Andy Miah, Author of Genetically Modified Athletes: Biomedical Ethics, Gene Doping & Sport (London and New York, Routledge) and the 'Bioethics & Sport' blogspot.

 

End ethics and sports technology

 

Technology and the Wilderness expereince, Sarah Pohl, Environmental Ethics, 28,2 Summer 2006 p. 147

Cars Autos Automobile

\

Sudhir Chella Rajan, “Automobility, Liberalism and the Ethics of Driving” Environmental Ethics Spring 2007 29,1.

 

 

Larry Hickman, ed., Technology as a Human Affair ("Some Meanings of Automobiles")

 

Sustainability and Cities: Overcoming Automobile Dependence, Peter Newmann and Jeffrey Kenworthy (Island, 1999)

 

Julia Meaton and David Morrice, "The Ethics and Politics of Private Automobile Use", Environmental Ethics 18,1 (Spring 1996).

 

Dr.Richard Porter, U of Michigan professor of Economics and author Economics behind the wheel: the hidden costs of cars and driving

 

Environmental Ethics And Law (The International Library of Environmental Law and Policy) (Hardcover) by Robert J. Goldstein (Editor) Ashgate Nov 2004

 

A John Simmons, ; "Makers' Rights," The Journal of Ethics (1998);

 

Kendall Walton, "Categories of Art," Philosophical Review 79 (1970) 339-67

 

 

"Speth, James Gustave. Red Sky at Morning: America and the Crisis of the Global Environment": New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004

 

Thomas Heyd, Recognizing the Autonomy of Nature Theory and Practice Columbia 2005

1. Introduction: Recognizing the Autonomy of Nature: Theory and Practice, by Thomas Heyd

Part I. Nature and Autonomy of Nature: Are They Real? 

2. Toward a Progressive Naturalism, by Val Plumwood

3. Is Nature Autonomous? , by Keekok Lee

Part II. Autonomous Nature and Human Interests: Are They Compatible?

4. The Liberation of Humanity and Nature, by Eric Katz

5. Respecting Nature’s Autonomy in Relationship with Humanity, by Ned Hettinger

6. Autonomy and Agriculture, by William Throop and Beth Vickers

Part III. Management, Restoration, and the Autonomy of Nature: A Paradox?

7. Homo Administrator: Managing a Needy Nature?, by Dean Bavington

8. Purple Loosestrife and the “Bounding” of Nature in North American Wetlands, by John Sandlos

9. Restoration, Autonomy, and Domination, by Andrew Light

10. Ecological Restoration and the Renewal of Wildness and Freedom, by Mark Woods

11. Conclusion: Autonomy, Restoration, and the Law of Nature, by William R. Jordan III

 

 

Paul Moriarty (Longwood State), "Nature Naturalized: A Darwinian Defense of the Nature/Culture Distinction" http//www.cep.unt.edu/ISEE2/moriarty.pdf

 

 

 

Mark Michael, “Is it Natural to Drive Species to Extinction?” Ethics and Environment, 10, 1 p. 49-66. “The natural can do no useful theoretical work in env. ethics”!!!!!

 

 

Michael, Mark, "An Alternative to the Common Heritage Principle," Environmental Ethics 9(1987):351-371. An argument in favor of a modified Lockean principle of acquisition regarding unowned resources. Nations should be permitted to acquire resources they develop, as long as there is some international mechanism to prevent overexploitation. This "limited Lockean" principle preserves fairness, freedom, and the maximization of the common good. (Katz, Bibl # 1)

 

Michael, Mark. "An Alternative to the Common Heritage Principle." Environmental Ethics 9(1987):351-71. Many valuable natural resources are found outside current territorial limits, for example, on the Moon and in the deep sea. As technology advances, these resources become more accessible. I argue that the claim that all humanity owns these resources is insupportable if taken literally. Because they are truly unowned, we need to develop a principle of justice in acquisition which describes the procedure that must be followed to obtain property rights to these unowned objects. I conclude with a tentative development of such a principle based on the moral ideals of fairness, freedom, and the maximization of the common good. Michael is in the philosophy department, State University of New York, Albany, NY. (EE)

 

Porritt, Jonathon, "The Common Heritage: What Heritage? Common to Whom?" Environmental Values Vol.1 No.3(1992):257-268. ABSTRACT: Global commons are natural goods which transcend national boundaries. A brief glance at management of oceans and terrestrial commons is succeeded by fuller discussion of rainforests, over which nations claim property rights, yet which perform global services. Leasing out could effect a desirable transfer of funds from North to South. Sustainable development requires these or other large incentives towards environmental protection in developing countries, but land and institutional reform are crucial to success. In conclusion, the anthropocentric ethic implicit in all such solutions is contrasted with the ecocentric one which may be necessary to preserve the biosphere in the future. KEYWORDS: Biosphere, global commons, rainforests, property rights, stewardship, sustainability. 30 Swinton Street, London WC1X 9NX, UK.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III, "Whose Woods These Are. Are Genetic Resources Private Property or Global Commons? Earthwatch, vol. 12, no. 3 (March/April 1993):17-18. Ownership of wild species, sometimes being claimed by Third World Nations, makes national resources out of a natural resource that has classically been part of the common heritage of humankind. There are conceptual and practical problems with claiming such wild species ownership. These species belong to us all, with a shared right to use and responsibility to protect. (v4,#2) Download/print in PDF format:

 

Rolston, III, Holmes. "Environmental Ethics in Antarctica. "The concerns of environmental ethics on other continents fail in Antarctica, which is without sustainable development, or ecosystems for a "land ethic," or even familiar terrestrial fauna and flora. An Antarctic regime, developing politically, has been developing an ethics, underrunning the politics, remarkably exemplified in the Madrid Protocol, protecting"the intrinsic value of Antarctica." Without inhabitants, claims of sovereignty are problematic. Antarctica is a continent for scientists and, more recently, tourists. Both focus on wild nature. Life is driven to extremes; these extremes can intensify an ethic. Antarctica as common heritage transforms into wilderness, sanctuary, wonderland. An appropriate ethics for the seventh continent differs radically from that for the other six. Environmmental Ethics 24(2002):115-134. (EE)

Paul Moriarity, “Nature Naturalized: A Darwinian Defense of the Nature/Culture Distinction” environmental Ethics 29,3 (Fall 2007): 227-246. Earlier version of paper at http://www.cep.unt.edu/ISEE2/moriarty.

 

Goldman, Alan “The Experiential Account of Aesthetic Value” Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64,3 (Summer 2006): 333-342.

 

Mark Michael, “Is it Natural to Drive Species to Extinction?” Ethics and Environment, 10, 1 p. 49-66. “The natural can do no useful theoretical work in env. ethics”!!!!!

 

Donna Ladkin, “Does Restoration Necessarily Imply the Domination of Nature?” Environmental Values 14 (2005): 203-19.

 

Steve Packard, “No End to Nature,” Restoration and Management Notes 8,2 (Winter 1990), p. 70.

Steve Packard, “Restoring Oak Ecosystems,” Restoration and Management Notes 11,1 (Summer 1993), pp. 5-16.

 

(Gary Paul Nabhan, 1991)

 

“Restoration and the Reentry of Nature” Orion Nature Quarterly (1986)

“Sunflower Forest: Ecological Restoration a Basis for a New Environmental Paradigm” Beyond Preservation (1994)

“Restoration, Community, and Wilderness” Restoring Nature (2000)

 

Visvader, John (1996) “Natura Naturans,” Human Ecology Review 3 (Autumn): 16-18.

 

Robert Elliot, “Faking Nature” 1982/1997

Stanley Kane (1994) “Preservation or Restoration? Reflections on a Clash of Environmental Philosophies”

John Visvader

 

“The Big Lie,” Research in Philosophy and Technology (1992)

“Another Look at Restoration: Technology and Artificial Life,” Restoring Nature (2000)

“Understanding Moral Limits in the Duality of Artifacts and Nature: A Reply to Critics,” Ethics & the Environment (2002)

 

“We must shoot deer to save nature,” Jared Diamond, Natural History 1992

 

 

 

Holmes Rolston, III., Conserving Natural Value(1994)

 

 

JAC A.A. Swart, “Care for the Wild: An Integrative View of Wild and domesticated Animals,” Environmental Values 14 (2005) 251-63.

 

Ethics, Place & Environment 1 to 9 of 9

Publisher:      Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group

Issue: Volume 8, Number 2 / June 2005

                         Offshore wind farms and commercial fisheries in the UK: A study in Stakeholder Consultation   pp. 127 - 140

             Tim Gray, Claire Haggett, Derek Bell 

                         The question of success and environmental ethics: Revisiting the DDT controversy from a transnational perspective, 1967–72     pp. 159 - 179

             David Kinkela

                         Sustainability, culture and ethics: Models from Latin America         pp. 223 - 234

             Thomas Heyd

                         The aesthetic appreciation of nature, scientific objectivity, and the standpoint of the subjugated: Anthropocentrism reimagined     pp. 235 - 250

             Wendy Lynne Lee

            I have this article on my computer but not printed out

 

Robert Elliot, “Instrumental Value in Nature as a Basis for the Intrinsic Value of Nature as a Whole,” Environmental Ethics 21, 1 Spring 2005, 43-56.

 

 

PBS Cadillac Desert Series OUT OF PRINT A boxed set of all four episodes of the PBS Cadillac Desert series.

 

Video: Cadillac Desert: Water and the Transformation of Nature - Mulholland's Dream (1997)

"Instant city--just add water!" The story of the transformation of Los Angeles from a neglected 19th-century town into America's largest metropolis boils down to William Mullholland's vision of a pipeline stretching across California to quench the parched town's thirst. Mulholland's Dream uses news footage, clips from Chinatown, and interviews with historians and residents of the areas sucked dry to tell how one desert was exchanged for another early in this century. L.A.'s explosive growth demanded ever-increasing inflow, and only very recently has the great city been forced to consider reducing its demand rather than increasing its supply. Comments from descendents of Mulholland and his adversaries enliven the picture, and we realize just how impassioned these men and women were--they were fighting for their lives. The story of the long struggles, both with neighbors and with nature, make for compelling viewing in this first of the series Cadillac Desert. --Rob Lightner

Description

Revealing the facts behind the fiction of Chinatown, Mulholland's Dream tells the story of William Mulholland, who secretly purchased water rights to the Owens River, then built an aqueduct to "deliver" it to Los Angeles. Includes interviews with Chinatown screenwriter Robert Towne and William Mulholland's granddaughter.

 

Video: Cadillac Desert: Water and the Transformation of Nature - The Mercy of Nature (1997) California produces much of America's food on some of its most arid land, the San Joaquin Valley. How did this happen? The Mercy of Nature tells the story of the politicians and engineers who created the largest system of water works ever executed, providing practically free water to farmers in the basin. Interviews and newsreel footage combine with haunting portraits of the miles of highway and acres of fields to bring the valley's story to life. The machinations of big business to exploit the government, the water, and the land are exposed, as well as the party-killing political atmosphere following revelations of pesticide buildup and cost overruns. Vivid, beautiful, and funny at times, this is a moving tribute to the small-time farmers who were there before the big projects and will remain after they're gone. Like the rest of the Cadilllac Desert series, The Mercy of Nature reminds us of our limits. --Rob Lightner

Description

This informative look at water politics traces the fierce battles that raged around the transformation of California's Central Valley from semiarid desert into the most environmentally altered agricultural region in history

 

 

Brower, David, ed.,The Place No One Knew Sierra Club, 1963

 

Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, Ethics, Ed. Carl Mitcham, McMillan reference 2005.

 

Bruce Babbit, Cities in the Wilderness. Island Press October 2005.

 

Above after August 17, 2005

 

Donald Worster, “The Ecology of Order and Chaos,” Environmental History Review 14 (1990): 1-18

 

Jan Narveson, “Who Owns Nature?” http://www.bioethics.iastate.edu/forum/narveson.html

Comments on Jan Narveson’s “Who Owns Nature?” by Ned Hettinger 

 

Harris, Paul G., "Affluence, Poverty and Ecology: International Relations, and Sustainable Development," Ethics and the Environment 2(1997):121-138. Effective efforts to protect the global environment will require the willing cooperation of the world's poor. Persuading them to join international environmental agreements and to choose environmentally sustainable development requires substantial concessions from the affluent industrialized countries, including additional financial assistance and technology transfers. The affluent countries ought to provide such assistance to the world's poor for ethical reasons. Doing so would promote transnational distributive justice, which is defined here as a fair and equitable distribution among countries of benefits, burdens and decision making authority, in this case associated with transnational environmental relations. Conceptions of distributive justice examined include utilitarianism, human rights, causality/responsibility, impartiality, and principles derived from Kantian and Rawlsian ethics. Harris is a visiting research fellow at the Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics, and Society. (E&E)

 

Helm, Carsten, and Simonis, Udo E. "Distributive Justice in International Environmental Policy: Axiomatic Foundation and Exemplary Formulation," Environmental Values 10(2001):5-18. Abstract: Proceeding on a limited number of general, widely accepted equity criteria, we develop a proposal for distributing common resources. In particular, the proposed fair division mechanism is individually rational, envy-free, Pareto-efficient and satisfies the stand alone test, which follows as a minimum requirement from the resource and population monotonicity criteria. Applied to international climate policy, the thrust of this proposal is that the South should initially be fully compensated for the greenhouse gas abatement measures it is to undertake as a result of efficiency considerations. Keywords: Fair division, equity, common resources, climate change. Helm is at Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Managment. Simonis is at the Science Centre Berlin, Environmental Policy Studies. (EV)

 

For a useful discussion of senses of "natural" see

2.Holmes Rolston, III, Environmental Ethics: Duties to and Values in the Natural, pp. 32-44;

3.Paul Taylor, Respect for Nature, pp. 3-14;

4.Jay Anderson, "A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating and Quantifying Naturalness," Conservation Biology 5, 3, Sept 1991.

5.Peter Wenz, "Treating Animals Naturally," Between the Species 5 (1989): 1-10.

6.Holmes Rolston, III, "Treating Animals Naturally?" Between the Species 5 (1989): 131-32.

7.Jay Anderson, "A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating and Quantifying Naturalness," Conservation Biology 5, 3, Sept 1991. Three indices of naturalness: (1) degree to which the system would change if humans were removed; 2, the amount of cultural energy required to maintain the functioning of the system as it currently exists, 3, the complement of native species currently in an area compared with the species that existed prior to settlement (also consider exotics introduced). Last two are quantifiable.

8.Holmes Rolston, "Can and ought we to Follow nature" Environmental Ethics Early env. ethics

9."The Ethics of Being a part of Nature, Environmental Ethics Recent env. ethics

10.Keekock Lee, The Natural and the Artefactual, especially pp. 82-86.

 

William S. Lynn (2005) Finding Common Ground in a Landscape of Deer and People, Chicago Wilderness Magazine 8 (Winter), 12-15.

 

Claude Evans, With Respect for Nature: Living as Part of the Natural World (SUNY, 2005).

 

Tom Butler, ed., Wild Earth: Wild Ideas for a World out of Balance, Milkweed Editions 2002 (according to author “widely adopted for use in college-level env. studies courses”)

 

The Value of Nature's Otherness Simon A. Hailwood Environmental Values 9(2000): 353-372

 

Katie McShane “Ecosystem Health” Environmental Ethics 26: 227-245 (Fall, 2004).  

 

Ecosystem Health: An Objective Evaluation? Lilly-Marlene Russow Environmental Values 4(1995): 363-369 Some ecologists and philosophers have tried to develop a concept of ecosystem health that would support a more 'objective' means of evaluating an ecosystem. I argue (following Dale Jamieson) that the concept of health is itself too subjective to justify such an attempt, and then suggest that part of the problem is that the goal of achieving greater objectivity is itself unclear. I analyse and evaluate three different ways of drawing the distinction between subjective and objective evaluations as a first step towards clarifying that goal.

 

ETERNAL TREBLINKA: Our Treatment of Animals and the Holocaust by Charles Patterson, Ph.D. Lantern Books, New York, 2002 (2nd printing) ISBN: 1-930051-99-9


THE SPLENDOR OF CREATION A Biblical Ecology By Ellen Bernstein 144 pp ISBN 0-8298-1664-X Spring 2005 $16.00

 

Paul Taylor, "Frankena on Environmental Ethics," THE MONIST, Vol. 64, No. 3 (July, 1981), p. 313-324.

 

Gillian Brock, Does obligation diminish with distance? Ethics, Place & Environment Volume 8, Number 1 / March 2005

  3 - 20

 

Many people believe in what can be described as a ‘concentric circles model of responsibilities to others’ in which responsibilities are generally stronger to those physically or affectively closer to us—those who, on this model, occupy circles nearer to us. In particular, it is believed that we have special ties to compatriots and, moreover, that these ties entail stronger obligations than the obligations we have to non-compatriots.

 

While I concede that our strongest obligations may generally be to those family and friends with whom we have close personal relationships, those often thought to occupy the inner core, what I want to challenge is the idea that our obligations diminish in strength when we move beyond the boundary of the circles occupied by compatriots and proceed to those more geographically or culturally distant from us. The weight that is typically placed on the boundary between compatriots and non-compatriots in determining the strength of our obligations to others cannot withstand critical scrutiny. In this paper I show that arguments that are supposed to work to justify stronger obligations to compatriots than non-compatriots do not succeed in the ways imagined. I also present the framework of a contractarian-style model which aims to give us a more systematic way to think about our obligations to ‘non-core’ others, both distant and near. While we can certainly have different kinds of obligations, my analysis shows that our basic obligations to others do not diminish with distance. In addition, my account aims to flesh out what our basic obligations to others are.

The Ethics of Waste: How We Relate to Rubbish by Gay Hawkins Nov 2004 Rowman and Littlefield

 

Deane Curtin, Environmental Ethics for a Post Colonial World Rowman and littlifield

 

Environmental Virtue Ethics. Ed. By Philip Cafaro And Ronald Sandler. Roman and Littlefield in library 2005; Cafaro on Thoreau, leopold and Carson, Hill, rol, Schmidtz on repugnant conclusions, Frasz on Benevolence, Cafaro on gluttony arrogance, greed and apathy: env. Vice, Wenz on Synergistic env. Virtues

 

 

 

 

AMERICAN VALUES: AMERICAN WILDERNESS, narrated by the late Christopher Reeve, now available on DVD exclusively from High Plains Films.

 

Price, Principle, and the Environment by Mark Sagoff Cambridge University Press November 2004 Contents:

1 Zuckerman's Dilemma: An Introduction 1

2 At the Monument to General Meade or On the Difference between Beliefs and Benefits 29

3 Should Preferences Count? 57

4 Value in Use and in Exchange or What Does Willingness to Pay Measure? 80

5 The Philosophical Common Sense of Pollution 101

6 On the Value of Wild Ecosystems 126

7 Carrying Capacity and Ecological Economics 154

8 Cows Are Better Than Condos or How Economists Help Solve Environmental Problems 177

9 The View from Quincy Library or Civic Engagement in Environmental Problem Solving 201

 

Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy is a new peer-reviewed, open access journal that provides a platform for the dissemination of new practices and for dialogue emerging out of the field of sustainability. http://ejournal.nbii.org/about/about.html

 

Religion and nature journal:
www.religionandnature.com/society/news/SocietyNews(0).pdf

HERE

Social Theory and Practice, Vol. 29, no. 2 (April 2003)

David Benatar             The Second Sexism

Kenneth Clatterbaugh             Benatar’s Alleged Second Sexism

James P. Sterba

            The Wolf Again in Sheep’s Clothing

Carol Quinn

and Rosemarie Tong  The Consequences of Taking the Second Sexism Seriously

Tom Digby     Male Trouble: Are Men Victims of Sexism?

David Benatar             The Second Sexism, a Second Time

 

Matthew Scully's Dominion St. Martins Press, 2002

Scully, Matthew, Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. New York: St. Martins, 2002. We humans may be "of" nature but we are not in it. For better or worse we have dominion over the Earth, and how we manage nature is a moral issue. In our relations to animals we have become insensitive tyrants rather than benign caretakers. It is wrong to be cruel to animals, and when our cruelty expands to the point where we no longer recognize the animals in a factory farm as living creatures capable of feeling pain, or when we insist on an inalienable right to shoot magnificent creatures like elephants for the thrill of it, we debase ourselves. We are called to treat them with kindness, not because they have rights or power or some claim to equality, but in a sense because they don't, because they stand unequal and powerless before us. Until we treat animals with more thoughtfulness, we forfeit the right to call ourselves Homo sapiens. Animals are more than ever a test of our character. Scully is a conservative Republican, one-time speech writer for George W. Bush. Reviewed by Natalie Angier in The New York Times, October 27, 2002. (v.13,#4)

 

Robert Kirkman The ethics of metropolitan growth: a framework Philosophy & Geography Volume 7, Number 2 / August 2004 Pages:             201 - 218

Although debates about the shape and future of the built environment are usually cast in economic and political terms, they also have an irreducible ethical component that stands in need of careful examination. This paper is the report of an exploratory study in descriptive ethics carried out in Atlanta, Georgia. Archival sources and semi-structured interviews provide the basis for identifying and sorting the diverse value judgments and value conflicts that come into play in a rapidly growing metropolitan area. The goal of the project is to expand and refine a draft framework for grappling with the ethical complexity of the situations from which individuals and communities make important decisions about their surroundings. The success of the framework is to be measured by its usefulness in informing the judgment of professionals and citizens, and in facilitating a robust normative debate about the built environment.

 

 Alan Carter, “Saving Nature and Feeding People,” Env. Ethics 26,4 Winter 2004.

 

Aaron Lercher, “Is Anyone to Blame for Pollution” Env. Ethics 26,4 Winter 2004.

“Only Man’s Presence Can Save Nature,” Harpers (April 1990) pp. 37-48, a debate between Michael Pollan, Daniel Botkin, Dave Foremen, James Lovelock, Frederick Turner, and Robert Yaro, includes sections on “Beyond Wilderness,” “Designing Nature,” “Speaking for the Wolf” includes discussion on if humans are natural

 

WRITINGS BY MICHAEL POLLAN

 

His website: http://www.michaelpollan.com/

            Looks like most of his articles are there.

 

Behind the Organic-Industrial Complex Michael Pollan / New York Times 13may01

            http://www.mindfully.org/Food/Organic-Industrial-Complex.htm

 

Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma 2006

Michael Pollan, The Botany of Desire

Michael Pollan, Second Nature: A Gardener’s Education (NY: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1991)

Michael Pollan, Playing God in the Garden (about genetically engineered potatoes) http://www.organics.org/features/god_garden.htm

 

Michael Pollan, NY Times around May 16, 2006 “Walmart goes organic; now the bad news”

Michael Pollan, A steer’s life: http://www.nehbc.org/pollan1.html

Power Steer: http://www.michaelpollan.com/article.php?id=14

Michael Pollan on beef industry, hormones, antibiotic FRESH AIR April 3, 2002 Wednesday Michael Pollan discusses the US beef industry ANCHORS: TERRY GROSS

http://www.math.uic.edu/~takata/some_articles/FreshAir_Michael_Pollon_on_beef_industry,_hormones,_antibiotics.html

 

M. Pollan, 1994, “Against nativism,” The New York Times Magazine, May 15: 52-55.

 

"Great Yellow Hype" Michael Pollen New York Times Magazine March 4, 2001 Michael Pollan on Golden rice: http://www.biotech-info.net/yellow_hype.html

 

"The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World,” by Michael Pollan. Random House, 2001.

 

Michael Pollan on Precautionary principle NY Times Magazine Dec 9 2001

END WRITINGS BY MICHAEL POLLAN

 

Brittan, Jr., Gordon G., "Wind, energy, landscape: reconciling nature and technology," Philosophy and Geography 4 (No. 2, 2001): 169-184. Despite the fact that they are in most respects environmentally benign, electricity-generating wind turbines frequently encounter a great deal of resistance. Much of this resistance is aesthetic in character; wind turbines somehow do not "fit" in the landscape. On one (classical) view, landscapes are beautiful to the extent that they are "scenic", well-balanced compositions. But wind turbines introduce a discordant note, they are out of "scale". On another (ecological) view, landscapes are beautiful if their various elements form a stable and integrated organic whole. But wind turbines are difficult to integrate into the biotic community; at least in certain respects, they are like "weeds". Moreover, there is a reason why the 100-meter, three bladed wind turbines now favored by the industry cannot very well be accommodated to any landscape view. They are, as Albert Borgmann would put it, characteristic of contemporary technology, distanced "devices" for the production of a commodity rather than "things" with which one can engage. It follows that the only way in which the aesthetic resistance to wind turbines can be overcome is to make them more "thing-like". One such "thing-like" turbine is discussed. Brittan is Regent's Professor of Philosophy at Montana State University. (P&G)

 

Kimbrell, Andrew, ed., Fatal Harvest: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture. Washington: Island Press, 2002. Published by the Foundation for Deep Ecology, by arrangement with Island Press. Our currently ecologically destructive agricultural system, and a vision for an organic and environmentally safer way of producing the food we eat. An abstract is reprinted as: "Silent Earth: Industrial Farming in the US Alone Kills 67 Million Birds a Year. When Will Agribusiness Stop Pretending They Care About the Environment?," Ecologist 33(no. 5, 2003): 58-59. (v.14, #4

 

Sullivan, Shannon, McCann, Elizabeth, DeYoung, Raymond, Erickson, Donna. "Farmers' Attitudes about Farming and the Environment: A Survey of Conventional and Organic Farmers," Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9(1996):123-143. This paper compares the attitudes and beliefs of a group of conventional farmers to those of a group of organic farmers. It was found that while both groups reject the idea that a farmer's role is to conquer nature, organic farmers were significantly more supportive of the notion that humans should live in harmony with nature. Organic farmers also reported a greater awareness of and appreciation for nature in their relationship with the land. Both groups view independence as a main benefit of farming and a lack of financial reward as its main drawback. Overall, conventional farmers report more stress in their lives although they also view themselves in a caretaker role for the land more than do the organic farmers. In contrast, organic farmers report more satisfaction with their lives, a greater concern of living ethically and a stronger perception of community. Both groups are willing to have their rights limited (organic farmers somewhat more so) but they do not trust the government to do so. Keywords: environmental attitudes, organic farming environmental ethics. Sullivan, DeYoung and Erickson teach in the School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan. McCann teaches in the College of Natural Resources, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point. (JAEE)

 

Verhoog, Henk, Matze, Mirjam, Van Bueren, Edith Lammerts, and Baars, Ton, "The role of the concept of the natural (naturalness) in organic farming," Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16(2003):29-49. Producers, traders, and consumers of organic food regularly use the concept of the natural (naturalness) to characterize organic agriculture and or organic food, in contrast to the unnaturalness of conventional agriculture. Critics sometimes argue that such use lacks any rational (scientific) basis and only refers to sentiment. In our project, we made an attempt to clarify the content and the use of the concepts of nature and naturalness in organic agriculture, to relate this conception to discussions within bioethical literature, and to draw the implications for agricultural practice and policy. We conclude that the idea of "naturalness" can be used to characterize organic agriculture and to distinguish it from conventional agriculture, but only if naturalness not only refers to not using chemicals but also to ecological principles and respect for the integrity of life. Thus perceived, the principle of naturalness can also serve as a guide to future developments in the field of organic agriculture. As part of the holocentric ethics of organic farming the value of naturalness has three dimensions: a cognitive one, an emotive one, and a normative one. KEY WORDS: concept of nature and naturalness, environment, ethics, farm ecology, integrity of life, organic agriculture and food. (JAEE)

Langdon Winner, “Do Artifacts have Politics?” P. 289 of David Kaplan Ed, Readings in the Philosophy of Technology 2004

 

Cafaro, Philip, "Less is More: Economic Consumption and the Good Life." Philosophy Today 42(1998): 26-39. We should judge economic consumption on whether it improves or detracts from our lives, and act on that basis. The issue of consumption is placed in the context of living a good life, in order to discuss its justifiable limits. Two important areas of our economic activity, food consumption and transportation, are examined from an eudaimonist perspective. From the perspective of our enlightened self-interest, we see that when it comes to economic consumption, less is more. Not always, and not beyond a certain minimum level. But often, less is more; especially for the middle and upper class members of wealthy industrial societies. This is the proper perspective from which to consider environmentalists' calls for limiting consumption in order to protect nature. (v.9,#3)

 

 

Jokes: Philosophical Thoughts on Joking Matters Ted Cohen: Great jokes, shame about the philosophy! Well, that's not entirely fair. This book presents a reasonable philosophy of jokes, but there's not a whole lot to say on this subject, and, anyway, it seems to miss the point somehow. Fortunately, the focus here is as much on the jokes, and some great ones are included, particularly a number of ingenious Jewish jokes which most people haven't heard.

 

'Respect for nature' in the earth charter: the value of species and the value of individuals p. 97 Clare Palmer, Ethics, Place, and Environment sometime in 2004?

 

Mary Midgely, "Biotechnology and Monstrosity: Why Should we Pay Attention to the 'Yuk Factor,'" Hasting Center Report 30, no 5 (2000) 7-15.

Richard Lewontin, “Genes in the Food!” New York Review of Books 48, 10 (21 June 2001): 81-84

 Mildred Cho, et al., “Ethical Considerations in Synthesizing a Minimal Genome,” Science 286, no 5447 (1999): 2087-90.

 

Ecoviolence and the Law (Transnational Pubs. Inc. NY,2004)

 

Child Labor Abroad, Roland Pierik, Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly 24,3 Summer 2004.

 

“Bambi Lovers versus Tree Huggers,” in Steve Sapontzis, e.d., Food for Thought: The Debate over Meat Eating (Amherst, NY; Prometheus, 2004), pp., 294-301.

 

Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions

by Cass R. Sunstein, Martha Craven Nussbaum Oxford 2004

 

Davis Baird on Nano Tech
Two pretty good books:

*Understanding Nanotechnology* by the editors of Scientific American is a nice very short (c. 100 pp.) booklet about nano

*Nanotechnology: A Gentle Introduction to the Next Big Idea* by D. Ratner and M. Ratner (father and son) is longer, but accessible and pretty good on the science. less good on the society stuff.

Our project has a work in progress website with other resources that could be helpful:

http://www.cla.sc.edu/cpecs/nirt/bibliography.html

There is a pretty nice historical presentation of the origins of nanotechnology "The Nanotechnology Revolution" by Adam Keiper in *The New Atlantis: A Journal of Technology and Society* Number 2, Summer 2003, pp. 17-34.

Finally, I've attached a paper of my own, "The Mythology of Nanotechnology" that drives through the material your question asks about, but at an oblique angle...

 

Human Enhancement

Ronald Cole-Turner “Do Means Matter Evaluating Technologies of Human Enhancement,” Report form Institute of Philosophy and Public Policy 18, 4 Fall 1998 p. 8-12

 

Claudia Mills, “One Pill Makes You Smarter: An Ethical Appraisal of Rise of Ritalin” Report form Institute of Philosophy and Public Policy 18, 4 Fall 1998 p 13-17

 

Eric Parens, ed., Enhancing Human Traits: Ethical and Social Implications, Georgetown U Press, Hastings Center Studies in Ethics. 1998 Read summary of arguments in eds intro.

This covers some of the ground in the Hastings Center Report special issue on enhancement printed in 1997

 

Carl Elliott, “Enhancement Technology” in David Kaplan Ed, Readings in the Philosophy of Technology 2004 7 pages

 

Carl Elliott, Better Than Well: American Medicine Meets the American Dream, Norton, June 2004 / paperback / ISBN 0-393-32565-2

 

 

Atlantic Unbound | August 5, 2003

 

Interviews

 

The Pursuit of Happiness

 

 

Carl Elliott, the author of Better Than Well, talks about amputee wannabes, Extreme Makeover, and the meta-ethics of bioethics\ 

 

 

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More on Books & Critics from The Atlantic Monthly.

 

More on Pursuits & Retreats from The Atlantic Monthly.

 

 

Previously in Interviews:

 

"Ranting Against Cant" (July 16, 2003)

Harold Bloom, a staunch defender of the Western literary tradition, returns to Shakespeare, "the true multicultural author." By Jennie Rothenberg.

 

"When the Earth Flexes Its Muscles" (July 10, 2003)

Simon Winchester, the author of Krakatoa, talks about the natural and cultural reverberations of a famous volcanic eruption.

 

"Learning in Public" (June 12, 2003)

Zoë Heller, the author of What Was She Thinking?, talks about trying a new point of view, and how journalism prepared her for fiction.

 

"Addicted to Oil" (May 29, 2003)

Robert Baer, a former CIA agent and the author of "The Fall of the House of Saud" (May Atlantic), discusses the perils of our dependence on Saudi Arabia and its precious supply of fuel.

 

"The Disease of the Modern Era" (May 20, 2003)

Alston Chase, the author of Harvard and the Unabomber, argues that we have much to fear from the forces that made Ted Kaczynski what he is. By Sage Stossel.

 

"The Calculus of Terror" (May 15, 2003)

Bruce Hoffman, a world-renowned expert on terrorism, talks about the strategy behind the suicide bombings in Israel—and what we must learn from Israel's response.

 

Interview with Carl Elliott: at http://www.americanscientist.org/template/InterviewTypeDetail/assetid/27457

 

Interview with Carl Elliott at: http://www.bioethics.gov/transcripts/sep02/session4.html

Atlantic Unbound | August 5, 2003

 Interviews with Carl Elliott

The Pursuit of Happiness

 

Earlier this year, the pharmaceutical manufacturer Allergan announced the "Be The True You 2003 Mall Tour," a traveling roadshow of sorts making the rounds of the nation's shopping centers, offering customer testimonials and consultations with doctors about Botox, a wrinkle-smoothing compound derived from botulinum toxin that won FDA approval for use as a cosmetic last year. When it hit the market, Botox was hailed in the media as the newest, strangest thing under the sun, and to the extent that it's not every day that a close cousin of botulism is touted as the latest route to youth and beauty, such fanfare was understandable. But for all its apparent novelty, Botox was only the most recent of a host of innovations promising renewal and redemption via scalpel, needle, or pill.

 

 

Future of food on web at http://www.nature.com/nature/food/ From Nature magazine Aug 2002.

 

DAVID TILMAN*, KENNETH G. CASSMAN‡, PAMELA A. MATSON§, ROSAMOND NAYLOR & STEPHEN POLASKY† Agricultural sustainability and intensive production practices Nature 418, 671 - 677 (08 August 2002); doi:10.1038/nature01014

 

 

JARED DIAMOND Evolution, consequences and future of plant and animal domestication

Nature 418, 700 - 707 (08 August 2002); doi:10.1038/nature01019

 

Leon R. Kass, THE WISDOM OF REPUGNANCE, New Republic, June 2, 1997

Leon R. Kass, The New Republic ("Preventing a Brave New World", May 2001)

 Leon R. Kass and Daniel Callahan“Let the Ban Stand” August 6, 2001, issue of The New Republic

 

 

Prodigal Summer: A novel by Barbara Kingsolver

Small Wonder (Perennial, 2003) by Barbara Kingsolver (includes essay on genetic engineering called “A Fist in the Eye of God”) available on web at

http://www.organicconsumers.org/gefood/SmallWonders.cfm

 http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1279/is_2002_August-Sept/ai_96268449

 

 

David DeGrazia, “Justice and Capabilities beyond Homo Sapiens,” Response to Martha Nussbaum’s Tanner Lectures on Human Values, Cambridge University, March 6, 200

 

A. Carter. In Defence of Radical Disobedience. Journal of Applied Philosophy, Volume 15, Number 1 (January 1998), pp. 29-47 The article defends the forms of civil disobedience currently practised by environmental protesters. It reviews the justifications of civil disobedience by Dworkin, Rawls and Singer, and finds them more or less wanting. A new and more extensive justification is provided on the basis of our duties to prevent harm befalling future generations.

 

McKenna, Erin Feminism and Vegetarianism: A Critique of Peter Singer Philosophy in the Contemporary World, 1: 3 (Fall 1994), 28-35 with a response by Peter Singer Singer, Peter

Feminism and Vegetarianism: A Response 1: 3 (Fall 1994), 36-38

 

 

Grounding Knowledge: Env Philosophy, Epistemology and Place, Christopher Preston 2003 U. of Georgia

 

The greening of white pride, Steven Gimbel A1 and Randall K. Wilson A2 Philosophy & Geography Issue: Volume 7, Number 1 / February 2004 Pages: 123 - 140

A1 Department of Philosophy Gettysburg College Gettysburg PA USA

A2 Department of Environmental Studies Gettysburg College Gettysburg PA USA

Abstract: At first glance, it is surprising that contemporary racist organizations like the Ku Klux Klan advertise a pro-environmental stance. This fact, however, might be expected by Luc Ferry, who argues for a connection between the racism and nature protection laws of the Third Reich. Ferry argues that a non-anthropocentric approach to nature makes it easier to dehumanize humans so that a non-anthropocentric environmental ethic can transform into racist environmentalism. Does this contemporary case vindicate Ferry? We argue that it does not. When the underlying theoretical foundations and historical conditions that gave rise to the racist environmentalist movements and the contemporary non-anthropocentric environmental left are analyzed, quite different pictures emerge: one type of non-anthropocentric environmentalism is racist, one type of anthropocentric environmentalism is racist, and one type of non-anthropocentric environmentalism is not racist, meaning that any relation between a non-anthropocentric approach to nature and dehumanizing the Other is more complex and historically contextual than Ferry allows.

 

Tibor Machan, Why Human Beings May Use Animals, Journal of Value Inquiry 36; 9-14, 2002.

 

Avner de-Shalit, Ruralism or Environmentalism, Environmental Values 5, 1996 47-58 he dist nostalgic, right wind anti modern ruralism and future oriented progressive eco informed anti specistic movement environmentalism

 

Karen Liftin, The Greening of Sovereignty in World Politics MIT Press, 1998. Including article by Dan Deudney

 

Earth and Nature-Based Spirituality From Deep Ecology to Radical Environmentalism,” Religion, 31, forthcoming April 2001.

 

“Deep Ecology and its Social Philosophy: A Critique,” in Beneath the Surface: Critical Essays on Deep Ecology. Eds. E. Katz. A. Light, D. Rothenberg. (Boston: MIT Press, 2000), 269-299. In CofC library: GE195 .B463 2000

 

“Bioregionalism: An Ethics of Loyalty to Place,” Landscape Journal, 19(1&2):50-72, 2000.

 

“Green Apocalypticism: Understanding Disaster in the Radical Environmental Worldview,” Society and Natural Resources, 12(4):377-386, June 1999.

 

“Nature & Supernature – Harmony and Mastery: Irony and Evolution in Contemporary Nature Religion,” The Pomegranate, #8 (May 1999), 21-27.

 

Judith Jarvis Thompson, A defense of Abortion, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 1971. This journal is available on line from our library.

 

Female circumcision:

The Ritual: Disfiguring, Hurtful, Wildly Festive” Washington Post 6/7/98, Vivienne Walt

“Village by Village, Circumcising a Ritual” New York Times, 1/31/97 A4.

Genital Cutting and Transnational Sisterhood Disputing U.S. Polemics, Edited by Stanlie M. James and Claire C. Robertson

Jeffrey Bishop, Modern Liberalism, Female Circumcision and the Rationality of Traditions, Journal of Medicine and Philosophy aug 2004: 473-497

 

Sirkku Kristiina Hellsten, Pluralism in Multicultural Liberal Democracy and the Justification of Female Circumcision, Journal of Applied Philosophy apr 99 16, 1 p. 69.

 

 

 

 

William James, “The Will to Believe,” available at: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/gthursby/fonda/jamesw.html

 

Alan Goldman, Plain Sex, Philosophy and Public affairs, spring 1997, 267-287

 

Bovenkerk and Brom, “Brave new Birds,” Hastings Center Report 31,1 Jan-feb 2002. Argues that animal’s integrity is violated by engineering them not to feel pain, even if their interests are not.

 


REFERENCES from Ned’s Rolston paper

 

Benzoni, Francisco 1996. "Rolston's Theological Ethic," Environmental Ethics 18 (4), pp. 339-52.

 

Berry, Wendell 1992. "Christianity and the Survival of Creation," in Sex, Economy, Freedom & Community. New York: Pantheon Books, pp. 93-116. http://www.crosscurrents.org/berry.htm

 

Hargrove, Eugene 1994. “The Paradox of Humanity: Two Views of Biodiversity and Landscapes,” in Ke Chung Kim and Robert D. Weaver, eds., Biodiversity and Landscapes. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 173-86.

 

Ostling, Richard 2003. “Colorado Pioneer in Environmental Ethics Wins Religion Prize Worth More than $1 Million,” Associated Press (March 19).

 

Ouderkirk, Wayne 1999. "Can Nature be Evil? Rolston, Disvalue, and Theodicy," Environmental Ethics 21 (2), pp. 135-50.

 

Holmes Rolston, "Are Values in Nature Subjective or Objective?" in Robert Elliot and Aaran Gare, Environmental Philosophy (St. Lucia, New York, London: University of Queensland Press and University Park, PA and London: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1983). Also reprinted in Holmes Rolston, Philosophy Gone Wild (Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1986).

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1983. “Values Gone Wild,” Inquiry 26, pp. 181-207.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1987. Science and Religion: A Critical Survey. New York: Random House.

 

Rolston Holmes, III 1988. Environmental Ethics. Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple University Press.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1991. “Respect for Life: Christians, Creation, and Environmental Ethics,” CTNS Bulletin: The Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences 11 (2), pp. 1-8.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1992. "Disvalues in Nature," Monist 75 (2), pp. 250-278.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1994a. Conserving Natural Values. New York: Columbia University Press.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1994b. “Creation: God and Endangered Species,” in Ke Chung Kim and Robert D. Weaver, eds., Biodiversity and Landscapes. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 47-59.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1995. “Does Aesthetic Appreciation of Landscapes Need to be Science-Based?” British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4), pp. 374-386.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 1996. "Scientific Inquiry" (Secular Scientific Spirituality) in Peter H. Van Ness, ed., Spirituality and the Secular Quest. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co., pp. 387-413. (Page numbers quoted in the text are from a draft version of this paper.)

 

Holmes Rolston, III 1998. “Evolutionary History and Divine Presence,” Theology Today 55, pp. 415-434.

 

Holmes Rolston, III 1999. Genes, Genesis, and God. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 2003. “Naturalizing and Systematizing Evil,” in Willem B. Drees, ed., Is Nature Every Evil? Religion, Science and Value. London: Routledge, pp. 67-86.

 

Rolston, Holmes, III 2004. Rolston’s com

 


Lauren Melzack’s Wildife rehab bib:

 

Barry, Bryon 1997 Strategic Planning for Non-Profit Organizations, Amherst Wilder Foundation, Wilder Publishing Co., Saint Paul, MN. 55104

 

Bostock, Stephen St C. 1993 Zoos and Animal Rights – The ethics of keeping animals

Routledge, Inc. 29 West 35th St., New York, NY 10001

 

Conway, William. 1995 Zoo Conservation and Ethical Paradoxes. Ethics of the Ark – Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

 

Croke, Vicki. 1997. The Modern Ark: the story of zoos: past, present and future. Scribner, NY, NY

 

Duke, Gary A, Frink, Lynne and Thrune, Elaine, 1998. Why Wildlife Rehabilitation is Significant. NWRA Quarterly Journal, Volume 16, #4

 

 

Emscher, Christof. 1999 Audubon: Writings and Drawings: Excerpts from “An Ornithological Biography or An Account of the Habits of the Birds of North America”

Literary Classics of the United States, Inc. NY, NY.

 

 

Geist, A.1995. Noah’s Ark II: Rescuing Species and Ecosystems. Ethics of the Ark – Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

 

 

Kiritz, Norton J. 1980 Program Planning and Proposal Writing, Grantsmanship Center Reprint Series, The Grantsmanship Center, Dept. DD, PO Box 17220, Las Angeles, CA. 90017

 

Leopold, Aldo. 1948. A Sand County Almanac. Oxford University Press, Inc. 198 Madison Ave. NY, NY. 10016

 

Loftin, Robert W. The Medical Treatment of Wild Animals Environmental Ethics

(8) Summer 1986

 

Miller, Erica DVM. 2000. Ethics and Professionalism in Wildlife Rehabilitation. NWRA Quarterly Journal, Volume 18, #3

 

McNamara, Carter 1999

www.mapnp.org/library/plan_dec/str_plan/models.htm

 

Regan, Tom 1985 The Case For Animal Rights The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book. Wadsworth/Thomas Learning, Davis Dr., Belmont, CA 94002

 

Regan, Tom. 1995 Are Zoos Morally Defensible? Ethics of the Ark – Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

 

Rolla, Donald A. 1982. Rehabilitators and the Public: For Wildlife’s Sake Who Needs Who. NWRA Proceedings Volume 1, pp156-161

 

Singer, Peter. 1973. Animal Liberation. The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book. Wadsworth/Thomas Learning, Davis Dr., Belmont, CA 94002

 

Sleeman, Jonathan M. MRCVS. 2004. Clinical Wildlife Medicine- A New Paradigm for a Century. Lecture at the NWRA Annual Symposium, Orlando FL.

 

Strang, Carl A. The Ethics of Wildlife Rehabilitation Environmental Ethics

(8) Summer 1986

 

Sunquist, Fiona. End of the Ark? International Wildlife, Nov-Dec 1995 v25 n6 p22(8)

 

Vrijenhoek, Robert 1995 Natural Processes, Individuals and Units of Conservation. Ethics of the Ark – Zoos, Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.

 

Unknown, 2002 Taking Flight: An Introduction to Building Friends Organizations, A National Wildlife Refuge Association Publication, 1010 Wisconson Ave., Suite 200, Washington, DC. 20007

 


 

Animal ethics article from woods/Moriarity

Aitken, Gill. 1997. “Conservation and Individual Worth.” Environmental Values 6: 439-454.

 

Lee, Keekok. 1997. “An Animal: What is it?” Environmental Values 6: 393-410.

 

Lemos, Noah M. 1994. Intrinsic Value: Concept and Warrant. Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press.

Zimmerman, Michael J. 2001. The Nature of Intrinsic Value. Lanham, MD: Rowman &

            Littlefield.

Luke, Brian. 1995. “Solidarity Across Diversity: A Pluralistic Rapprochement of

            Environmentalism and Animal Liberation.” Social Theory and Practice 21: 177-206.

O’Neil, Rick. 2000. “Animal Liberation versus Environmentalism: The Care Solution.”

Environmental Ethics 22: 183-190.

O’Neil. Rick. 1997. “Intrinsic Value, Moral Standing, and Species.” Environmental Ethics 19:

45-52.

Singer, Peter. 2004b. “Environmental Values.” Reprinted in Environmental Ethics: Divergence

            and Convergence, 3rd ed., Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler, eds. Boston: McGraw-

Hill.

Taylor, Angus. 2003. Animals and Ethics: An Overview of the Philosophical Debate.

Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press.

 

Taylor, Angus. 1996. “Animal Rights and Human Needs.” Environmental Ethics 18: 249-264.

 

 

Criticisms of deep ecology:

 

Richard Sylvan, "A critique of deep ecology," Radical Philosophy, no. 40 (Summer 1985). I have. Also in or continued in? volume 41 Autumn 85: 10-22.

 

William Grey, Anthropocentrism and Deep Ecology,” Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71:4 (December 1993) 463-475.

 

Grey, William, "A Critique of Deep Ecology." Journal of Applied Philosophy 3, no. 2

      (1986): 211-216.

Drengson, Alan R. "A Critique of Deep Ecology? Response to William Grey." Journal

      of Applied Philosophy 4 (1987): 223-227.

 

Alan Drengson, “The Deep Ecology Movement,” The Trumpeter 12 1995.

 

 

George Sessions, ed., Deep Ecology for the 21st Century, Shambhala, 1995.

 

David Ray Griffin Reenchantment without Supernaturalism: A Process Philosophy of Religion (Cornell UP, 2001).

 

Dancing with the Sacred: Evolution, Ecology, and God by Karl E. Peters Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 2002 This is an engaging and readable statement of a naturalistic theism, a version of the emerging theological movement often known as Religious Naturalism

 

Rolston, Holmes, III, "Environment, Nature, and God," co-authored with Jack Weir (Department of Philosophy, Hardin-Simmons University). Chapter 22, pages 229-240, in Frederick Ferre, ed., Concepts of Nature and God (Athens: University of Georgia, Department of Philosophy, 1989). Proceedings of 1987 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute on Concepts of Nature and God.

 

 

Ouderkirk, Wayne. "Can Nature be Evil? Rolston, Disvalue, and Theodicy." Environmental Ethics 21(1999):135-150

 

Jeff McMahan, The Ethics of Killing, Problems at the Margins of Life, Oxford 2002 McMahan, Jeff. The ethics of killing : problems at the margins of life / Jeff McMahan.

In Library: HV6515 .M35 2002 I have.

 

David Degrazia, “Identity, Killing and the Boundaries of Our Existence,” Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (4) (2003)

 

David Degrazia, “Persons, Organisms, and Death: A Philosophical Critique of the Higher-Brain Approach,” Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (3) (1999)

 

Between the species, on line version, at: http://cla.calpoly.edu/~jlynch/  

Issue III, August 2003 Robbing PETA to Spay Paul: Do Animal Rights Include

Reproductive Rights?----David Boonin, University of Colorado; The Ethic of Care and the Problem of Wild Animals---Grace Clement

 

Theodicy and Animal Pain, Between the Species August 2002, Tony Lynch and Gary Comstock debate. http://cla.calpoly.edu/~jlynch/

 

David W. Orr, Nature of Design: Ecology, Culture and Human Intention Dec 2001

 

End search for library buying October 11, 2006

Joe Bruchac, Native American Story Teller I saw at Env. and Com conference Saratoga Springs, NY, March 2004.

 

Alan Carter, “Projectivism and the Last Person Argument,” American Philosophical Quarterly 41, 1 (January 2004): 51-62.

 

Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology and Natural Selection   Suffering and Responsibility Lisa Sideris, Columbia Univ Press 2003

 

Holmes Rolston, III -- Theology and science: listening to each other in Religion & science : history, method, dialogue / edited by W. Mark Richardson and Wesley J. Wildman. New York : Routledge, 1996.

 

 


“The campus community and the concept of sustainability: An Analysis of College of Charleston Student Perceptions,” Charles Earl and others, Chrestomathy, Vol2, 2003.


See Inquiry 39, no 2 (June 1996) special isssue on Arne Naess' Environmental thought, guest edited by Andrew Light and David Rothernberg.


Beach nourishment, issue of Coastal Heritage, Coastal Heritage, Vol. 18, No. 3, Winter 2003-04; A Line in the Sand: Nourishing South Carolina's Beaches available at http://www.scseagrant.org/library/library_coaher_win03.htm



 S.C. Sea Grant Consortium coastal heritage publications on line:

http://www.scseagrant.org/library/library_coaher.htm


Wayne Ouderkirk: Can Nature be Evil? Rolston, Disvalue, and Theodicy, Env. Ethics, Vol 21, Summer 1999.


Sandy Marie Angl…s Grande: Beyond the Ecological Noble Savage: Deconstructing the White Man's Indian, Env. Ethics, vol 21, fall 1999.



 Francisco Benzoni: Rolston's Theological, Ethic Environmental Ethics, WINTER 1996


McKibben, Bill. Enough : staying human in an engineered age / Bill McKibben. New York : Times Books, c2003 On Genetic engineering In library



--Rauch, Jonathan, "Will Frankenfood Save the Planet?" The Atlantic Monthly, October 2003, pages 103-108. "Over the next half century genetic engineering could feed humanity and solve a raft of environmental ills--if only environmentalists would let it." Rauch is a correspondent for The Atlantic.


--Post, Stephen G., editor in chief, Encyclopedia of Bioethics, 3rd edition. 5 vols. New York: Macmillan Reference, 2003. includes -Rolston, Holmes: "Animal Welfare and Rights. III. Wildlife Conservation and Management"


--Berger, J, "Is It Acceptable to Let a Species Go Extinct in a National Park?," Conservation Biology 17(no.5, 2003):1451-1454.


--Schmidz, David, "Are All Species Equal?" Journal of Applied Philosophy, 15(1998):57-67.Species egalitarianism is the view that all species have equal moral standing. To have moral standing is, at a minimum, to command respect, to be something more than a mere thing. Is there any reason to believe that all species have moral standing in even this most minimal sense? If so - that is, if all species command respect - is there any reason to believe they all command equal respect. The article summarises critical responses to Paul Taylor's argument for species egalitarianism, then explains why other species command our respect but also why they do not command equal respect. The intuition that we should have respect for nature is part of what motivates people to embrace species egalitarianism, but one need not be a species egalitarian to have respect for nature. The article closes by questioning whether species egalitarianism is even compatible with respect for nature.


Minteer, Ben A., and Manning, Robert E., eds., Reconstructing Conservation: Finding Common Ground. Washington, DC: Island Press, 2001. Includes:

-Norton, Bryan, "Conservation: Moral Crusade or Environmental Public Policy?" pages 187-205.

-Callicott, J. Baird, "The Implications of the `Shifting Paradigm' in Ecology for Paradigm Shifts in the Philosophy of Conservation," pages 239-261.


--Post, Stephen G., editor in chief, Encyclopedia of Bioethics, 3rd edition. 5 vols. New York: Macmillan Reference, 2003. Some articles relevant to environmental philosophy and animal issues: (These are mostly carried over from the 2nd edition, Warren T. Reich, editor-in-chief, Macmillan Library Reference, Simon and Schuster, 1995, with Holmes Rolston, III as area editor for environmental ethics and animal welfare issues.

-Sagoff, Mark, "Agriculture and Biotechnology"

-Singer, Peter, "Animal Research: Philosophical Issues"

-Regan, Thomas, "Animal Welfare and Rights: I. Ethical Perspectives on the Treatment and Status of Animals"

-Linzey, Andrew, "Animal Welfare and Rights. II. Vegetarianism"

-Rolston, Holmes: "Animal Welfare and Rights. III. Wildlife Conservation and Management"

-Linzey, Andrew, "Animal Welfare and Rights: IV. Pet and Companion Animals"

-Dunlap, Julie, "Animal Welfare and Rights: V. Zoos and Zoological Parks"

-Bernard E. Rollin, "Animal Welfare and Rights: VI. Animals in Agriculture and Farming"

-Jamieson, Dale, "Climate Change"

-Lauritzen, Paul, "Cloning III: Religious Perspectives"

-Rolston, Holmes, "Endangered Species and Biodiversity"

-Callicott, J. Baird, "Environmental Ethics: Overview"

-Naess, Arne, "Deep Ecology"

-Callicott, J. Baird, "Environmental Ethics: III. Law and Ethics"

-Warren, Karen J., "Environmental Ethics: IV. Ecofeminism"

-Sagoff, Mark, "Environmental Policy and Law"

-Peters, Philip J., "Future Generations, Obligations to"

-Shrader-Frechette, Kristin, "Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Substances"

-Newton, Lisa H., "Life"

-Lennox, James A., "Nature"

Stephen Cahn, Morality and public policy, 2003, Prentice Hall, great articles on school vouchers, government support for the arts, feinberg on feminist case agains tporn, same sex marriage, drug legislation, gun control, immigration,


Special issue on environmental narrative, Ethics and Environment, 8,2 Autumn 2003


Bradford Wyche, An overview of Land use Regulations in South Carolina, Southeastern env. law journal 11, 2 spring 2003.


American Philosophical Quarterly (40, 4) October 2003 just saw on "The Metaphysics of Informed Environmental Concern" by Paul Tomassi that appears to argue that metaphysical realism is implied by env. concern.....


Framing with the Wild: Enhancing Biodiversity on Farms and Ranches, coffee table book, 2003, Sierra Club books, deep ecology foundation?


L.E. Johnson, “Species, on their nature and moral standing,” Journal of Natural history 29, 843-49, 1995.


Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 17:15:35 -0800
From: Andrew Light <andrew.light@NYU.EDU>
Subject: [ISEE-L] Announcement: Civic Environmentalism Conference

Workshop Announcement Designing for Civic Environmentalism
November 12-15, 2003 School of Architecture University of Texas at Austin

A combined architectural studio and academic workshop sponsored by the Harrington Faculty Fellowship program at the University of Texas at Austin and the UT Center for Sustainable Development. Coordinators: Andrew Light (NYU) and Steven Moore (University of Texas)

A critical literature is growing on the relationship between democratic participation and the resolution of environmental problems. Called variously "civic environmentalism," and "ecological citizenship," such proposals have in common the belief that environmental problems will not be solved without encouraging environmental forms of substantial civic participation. But beyond the theoretical debates which have shaped this literature, what architectural or planning designs would best encourage a more morally responsible set of environmental virtues among citizens? The aim of this workshop is to encourage a more focused discussion of these themes, and therefore a more specific set of proposals concerning the structural possibilities for creating a civic environmentalism.


Friday, November 14-Saturday, November 15 Academic Workshop. Presentations begin at 9:30AM, including:

Kevin Anderson, Geography, University of Texas

"Marginal Nature and Moral Margins: Valuing Nature in the Shadow of the City"

Craig Hanks, Philosophy, Southwest Texas State University

"The 'American Century' as Symptom and Dream: Some Notes Toward A Critical Urban Environmentalism"

Hope Hasbrouck, Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

"Sites in Systems"

Kathleen Higgins, Philosophy, University of Texas

"Marketing Environmentalism: The Aesthetics of Ecology."

Eric Katz, Philosophy & STS, New Jersey Institute of Technology

"Follow the Money: Environmentalism and the Paradox of Greed"

Roger King, Philosophy, University of Maine

"Playing with Boundaries: Ethical Reflections on Designing an Environmental Culture"

John O'Neill, Philosophy, Lancaster University (U.K.)

"The Nature of Narrative"

Michael Oden, Planning, University of Texas

"Civic Environmentalism, Self Interest, and the Problem of Power

"Barbara Parmenter, Planning, University of Texas

"Planners, Citizens, and Communities: Cautions and Opportunities for 'Planning' Civic Environmentalism"

Gary Rohrbacher, Architecture, University of Texas

"Environmental Civility"

Yuriko Saito, Philosophy, Rhode Island School of Design

"The Role of Aesthetics in Environmentalism"

James Sheppard, Philosophy, University of Missouri, Kansas City

"Civic Design and Regional Connectedness in Urban America"

William Shutkin, Urban Studies and Planning, MIT

"Building Communities of Place: From Ideals to Practices"

Jonathan Smith, Geography, Texas A&M University

"Modern Identity and the Predicament of Place."

Fritz Steiner, Architecture, University of Texas

"The Human Ecology of the First Urban Century"

Closing Comments and Discussion by Andrew Light, Environmental Philosophy, New York University and Steven Moore, Architecture and Planning, University of Texas


Deborah Winter and Susan Koger, The Psychology of Environmental Problems, 2004 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc


Raymond S. Nickerson, Psychology and Environmental Change2003 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc


Naess, Arne, "Should We Try To Relieve Clear Cases of Extreme Suffering in Nature? Pan Ecology, vol. 6, no. 1, Winter 1991. Naess examines "the darker side of free nature." "Perseverance in the service of protecting nature, support of the deep ecology movement, does not imply any definite opinion on questions of unconditional goodness of nature as a set of ecosystems." "If adequate ecological knowledge were available, some of us would not hesitate to interfere on a large scale against intense and persistent pain." Naess would not interfere with most predation or parasitism, but thinks there are exceptions. He would, if he could, eliminate a reindeer parasite, Cephenomyia trompe, an insect whose larvae grow in the noses of reindeer and slowly suffocate them. "What do humans do when witnessing animals in what they think is unnecessary and prolonged pain? Those who intensively identify with the victims try to rescue them--provided it is not too late and a practical way is seen. Generalized, and made into a policy, rescue attempts would not amount to an attempt to interfere and reform nature." "Respect for the dignity of free nature and proper humility do not rule out planned interference on a greater scale, as long as the aim is a moderation of conditions of extreme and prolonged pain, human or nonhuman. Such pain eliminates the experience of a joyful reality. The higher levels of self-realization of a mature being require assistance to other living beings to realize their potentialities, and this inevitably actualizes concern for the sufferers." Naess is professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Oslo and the founder of deep ecology. (v2,#1)


Des Kennedy, Nature’s Outcasts: A new Look at Living Things we love to hate, Pownal, Vermont: Storey Communications, 1993)

Sanford Levy, The Biophilia Hypothesis and Anthropocentric Environmentalism, Env. Ethics 25,3, Fall 2003.


Len Olsen, “Contemplating the Intentions of Anglers: The Ethicist’s Challenge” Env. Ethics 25,3, Fall 2003. On de Leuuw’s critique of fishing.


Chipeniuk, Raymond. "On Contemplating the Interests of Fish." Environmental Ethics 19(1997):331-332. (EE)


deLeeuw (de Leeuw), A. Dionys, "Contemplating the Interests of Fish: The Angler's Challenge" Environmental Ethics 18(1996):373-390. I examine the morality of sport fishing by focusing on the respect that anglers show for the interests of fish compared to the respect that hunters show for their game. Angling is a form of hunting because of the strong link between these two activities in literature, in management, and in the individual's participation in both angling and hunting, and in the similarity of both activities during the process of pursuing an animal in order to control it. Fish are similar in many ways to animals that are hunted, including their interests in survival and in avoiding pain. These interests need to be considered by anglers for moral reasons. All hunters and anglers value their sport with animals more than they respect the lives of animals they pursue. Hunters are, therefore, similar to anglers in the respect that they show for the survival interests of their game animals. Hunters, however, are significantly different from anglers in the respect that they show for an animal's interest in avoiding pain and suffering. While hunters make every effort to reduce pain and suffering in their game animals, anglers purposefully inflict these conditions on fish. These similarities and differences have three important consequences. (1) The moral argument justifying the killing of animals for sport in hunting must apply to all of angling as well. (2) Angling, unlike hunting, requires a second justification for the intentional infliction of avoidable pain and suffering in fish. (3) If ethical hunters hold true to their principle of avoiding all suffering in animal that they pursue, then hunters must reject all sports fishing. de Leeuw is a biologist with the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands, and Parks. Williams directs an institute for applied ethics, and teaches philosophy at Saint Thomas University, Fredericton, New Brunwick. (EE)


Olsen, Len. "Contemplating the Intentions of Anglers: The Ethicist's Challenge." Environmental Ethics 25(2003):267-277. There are theoretical difficulties involving the intentions of anglers that must be faced by anyone who wants to argue that sport fishing is ethically impermissible. Recent arguments have focused on what might be called the sadistic argument. This argument is fatally flawed because sport fishing is not a sadistic activity. (EE)



Predation begin

 

Policing Nature, Tyler Cowen, Env.Ethics 25 Summer 2003 on stopping predation in nature.

Cowen,Tyler. "Policing Nature." Environmental Ethics 25(2003):169-182. Utility, rights, and holistic standards all point toward some modest steps to limit or check the predatory activity of carnivores relative to their victims. At the very least, we should limit current subsidies to nature's carnivores. Policing nature need not be absurdly costly or violate common-sense intuitions. (EE)


Another good reference, re: ethical qualms about predation in nature, is Alexander Skutch's The Imperative Call: A Naturalist's Quest in Temperate and Tropical America. Skutch is (perhaps by now was) an ornithologist who lived most of his life in Costa Rica, doing science and conservation work. He was also a follower of Gandhi and comprehensive nonviolence. It is fascinating to read his discussion of what a "better nature," one without predation, might have looked like. Fascinating because he is so knowledgeable about real nature, adn committed to its protection. From phil cafaro


Tyler Raterman, "An Environmentalist's Lament of Predation" Environmental Ethics, Volume 30, No. 4 (Winter 2008): 417-34. I lament the fact that some animals need to prey on others in order to live. While I obviously do not want predators to die of starvation, I nonetheless think that a world in which no animal needed to prey on others would, in some meaningful sense, be a better world. Furthermore, I believe that this position is not based in mere sentimentalism, but rather can be rationally defended. This paper attempts to provide such a defense. After articulating numerous reasons for taking predation to be lamentable, I argue that one can lament predation even while acknowledging certain respects in which predation is genuinely praiseworthy. Further, I maintain that holding the position I do does not disqualify me as an environmentalist. Finally, I explore what the implications of my position are for human behavior; and I argue that they are acceptable.


Bekoff, Marc, with Meaney, Carron A. Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Foreward by Jane Goodall. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998. 446 pages. $ 60.00 hardcover. Useful and relatively compact handbook. Each article ends with a brief selected bibliography. A chronology (1822-1995) related to animals of events in the USA, UK, and other countries (pp.xvii-xxi). A long appendix entitled "Resources on Animal Welfare and Humane Education." Bekoff teaches biology at the University of Colorado, and Meaney is at the Denver Museum of Natural History. The Encyclopedia sold 1500 copies in its first month! Here'a a sampling of articles: --Hettinger, Ned, "Environmental Ethics," pages 159-61. --Sapontzis, Steve F., "Environmental Ethics versus Animal Rights," pages 161-62. --Pacelle, Wayne, "Hunting," pages 196-97. --Cartmill, Matt, "History of Ideas Surrounding Hunting," pages197-99. --Varner, Gary, "Environmental Ethics and Hunting," pages 200-201. --Varner, Gary, "Vegetarian Diets: Ethics and Health," pages 351-52. --Bissell, Steven J., "Hunting in the United States," pages 201-2 --Causey, Ann S., "Fair Chase," pages 202-3. --Sapontzis, Steve F., "Predation," pages 275-76. --Landsell Herbert, "Nonrightist's View [of Hunting]," pages 277-78.


Bruno, John F., Stachowicz, John J., and Bertness, Mark D., "Inclusion of facilitation into ecological theory," Trends in Ecology and Evolution (TREE) 18(no. 3, 2003):119-125. A controversial push to focus on positive ecological interactions rather than competition and predation has ignited a debate among ecologists. A new group of ecologists argue that much of modern ecological theory stems from a misleading fixation on the roles of competition, predation, and externally imposed stress in shaping natural communities. Missing from core concepts, they argue, is the growing realization that species can interact in positive ways--a process called facilitation--with major consequences for community structure. See also: Shouse, Ben, "Conflict over Cooperation," Science 299(31 January 2003):644-646.



Jamieson, Dale, "Rights, Justice, and Duties to Provide Assistance: A Critique of Regan's Theory of Rights," Ethics 100(January 1990):349-362. Regan's Case for Animal Rights solves the predation problem by claiming that we humans are required to assist those who are victims of injustice, but we are not required to help those in need who are not victims of injustice. We have no duty to assist the sheep about to be eaten by the wolf, since the wolf is not committing an injustice. But that is an inadequate reply. Consider a case where a human is about to be injured by a boulder rolling down a hill? If the boulder is set in motion deliberately by another human wishing to kill the victim, we are required to assist. But if the boulder is set in motion by an animal inadvertently, we are not required to assist. We are required to help those about to be harmed regardless of whether moral agency in present at the source of harm. But with this Regan's reply about predation fails, and the predation problem is unsolved in the animal rights' view. Jamieson is at the University of Colorado, Boulder. (v2,#4


McGowan, Christopher, The Raptor and the Lamb: Predators and Prey in the Living World. New York: Henry Holt, 1997. 235 pages. $ 25. Predation is one of the fundamental forces driving the economy of life on Earth, and humans are fascinated by it. Studying predation offers a way to understand dynamic relations among species and to see the adaptations made in response to a dangerous world. McGowan is in zoology at the University of Toronto. (v8,#3)


Hettinger, Ned. "Valuing Predation in Rolston's Environmental Ethics: Bambi Lovers versus Tree Huggers." Environmental Ethics 16(1994):3-20. Without modification, Rolston's environmental ethics is biased in favor of plants, since he gives them stronger protection than animals. Rolston can avoid this bias by extending his principle protecting plants (the principle of the nonloss of goods) to human interactions with animals. Were he to do so, however, he would risk undermining his acceptance of meat eating and certain types of hunting. I argue, nevertheless, that meat eating and hunting, properly conceived, are compatible with this extended ethics. As the quintessential natural process, carnivorous predation is rightfully valued and respected by such environmentalists as Rolston. Because the condemnation of human participation in predation by animal activists suggests a hatred of nature, the challenge for Rolston's animal activist critics is to show that one can properly appreciate natural predation while consistently and plausibly objecting to human participation in it. Hettinger, is in the department of philosophy, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC. (EE)


Moriarty, Paul Veatch and Mark Woods. "Hunting [does not equal] Predation." Environmental Ethics 19(1997):391-404. Holmes Rolston has defended certain forms of hunting and meat eating when these activities are seen as natural participation in the food chains in which we evolved. Ned Hettinger has suggested that some of Rolston's principles that govern our interactions with plants and animals might appear to be inconsistent with Rolston's defense of these activities. Hettinger attempts to show that they are not. We argue that Rolston's principles are not consistent with hunting, given Hettinger's modifications. In his defense of Rolston, Hettinger has challenged animal welfare ethicists to show that they can value animal predation while consistently condemning human hunting. We answer that hunting and meat eating by humans are "cultural" rather than "natural" activities. Moriarty teaches philosophy at Longwood College, Farmville, VA. Wood is in philosophy at the University of San Diego, CA. (EE)


Everett, Jennifer, "Environmental Ethics, Animal Welfarism, and the Problem of Predation: A Bambi Lover's Respect for Nature," Ethics and the Environment 6(no. 1, 2001):42-67. Many environmentalists criticize as unecological the emphasis that animal liberationists and animal rights theorists place on preventing animal suffering. The strong form of their objection holds that both theories absurdly entail a duty to intervene in wild predation. The weak form holds that animal welfarists must at least regard predation as bad, and that this stance reflects an arrogance toward nature that true environmentalists should reject. This paper disputes both versions of the predation critique. Animal welfarists are not committed to protecting the rabbit from the fox, nor do their principles implicitly deprecate nature. Everett is in philosophy, University of Anchorage, Alaska. (E&E)


Naess, Arne, "Should We Try To Relieve Clear Cases of Extreme Suffering in Nature? Pan Ecology, vol. 6, no. 1, Winter 1991. Naess examines "the darker side of free nature." "Perseverance in the service of protecting nature, support of the deep ecology movement, does not imply any definite opinion on questions of unconditional goodness of nature as a set of ecosystems." "If adequate ecological knowledge were available, some of us would not hesitate to interfere on a large scale against intense and persistent pain." Naess would not interfere with most predation or parasitism, but thinks there are exceptions. He would, if he could, eliminate a reindeer parasite, Cephenomyia trompe, an insect whose larvae grow in the noses of reindeer and slowly suffocate them. "What do humans do when witnessing animals in what they think is unnecessary and prolonged pain? Those who intensively identify with the victims try to rescue them--provided it is not too late and a practical way is seen. Generalized, and made into a policy, rescue attempts would not amount to an attempt to interfere and reform nature." "Respect for the dignity of free nature and proper humility do not rule out planned interference on a greater scale, as long as the aim is a moderation of conditions of extreme and prolonged pain, human or nonhuman. Such pain eliminates the experience of a joyful reality. The higher levels of self-realization of a mature being require assistance to other living beings to realize their potentialities, and this inevitably actualizes concern for the sufferers." Naess is professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Oslo and the founder of deep ecology. (v2,#1)


Risk, Paul, "Death, Suffering, Predation, Animal Rights and Interpretation," Journal of Interpretation 14 (no. 1, 1990):R-12-R-15. Suffering and death are part of the natural scheme of things, but pose a difficult problem to the environmental interpreter, especially when dealing with children, or with "bleeding hearts." We ought to incorporate honesty, entirety, and moral implications into environmental interpretation. Risk teaches parks, recreation, and tourism at the University of Maine. (v5,#4)


Sapontzis, Steve F., "Predation." Ethics and Animals, Vol. 5, no. 2 (June 1984): 27-38. The reductio ad absurdum of the animal rights position, especially as applied to environmental issues. Sapontzis argues that the prevention of predation is not in itself an "absurd" position. But most of his discussion centers on the meaning of the words "absurd" or "avoidable" or "impractical"--not on the substantive issues. A good lesson in what is wrong with analytical philosophy. (Katz, Bibl # 1)


Predation end



To: <hettingern@cofc.edu>

Subject: Philosophy & Geography - New Issue Alert

SARA registrant,

Volume 6 Number 2/August 2003 of Philosophy & Geography is now available on the Taylor & Francis web site at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com.

Introduction: pragmatism and urban environments

p. 139

Thomas C. Hilde

URL of article: http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=3HA7WNEY7K6Y0GHD

Democratic ideals and the urban experience

p. 145

Shannon Kincaid

URL of article: http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=QKL4314KXQ7NWUMW

Bebop as historical actuality, urban aesthetic, and critical utterance

p. 153

Vincent Colapietro

 

 

 

American Indian Environmental Ethics, An Ojibwa Case Study, Callicott and Nelson, Prentice Hall 2004.

 

Genetic Engineering and our human nature, by Harold Baillie: Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly (QQ) 23, ½, 2003, understanding the scared helps identify elements in nature and humannature that ought to be preserved.

 

C. Pointing, A Green History of the World (New York: St Martin’s 1991)

Clive Pointing, Green History of the World: The Environment and the Collapse of Great Civilizations

 

Clive Pointing, Green History of the World: Nature, Pollution & the Collapse of Societies (Penguine 1993).

 

Talking Plants, Npr.org

 

Dale Jamieson, Morality’s Progress, Oxford 2002, includes Wild/Captive and other suspect dualisms, sustainability and beyond, moral responsibility in biotech communication, several articles on animal experimentation including one with Bekoff on “Ethics and the Study of Animal Cognition,” pain and the evolution of behavior, great apes and the human resistance to equality, is applied ethics worth doing?

 

Dale Jamieson, 1998, Science, Knoweldge, and Animal Minds,” Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98,1 79-102

 

on preserving the natural environment, mark sagoff Yale Law Journal 1974

 

PARTICPATING WITH NATURE: OUTLINE FOR AN `ECOLOGIZATION OF OUR WORLD-VIEW by Wim Zweers.

 

Yi-Fu Tuan, U. of Wis Cultural geographer, Dominance and Affection: The Making of Pets 1984.

 

Rivto, The Animal Estate (1987) (on pets)

 

Mark Derr, “Cute but Wild: The Perilous Lure of Exotic Pets. ”

Geo-Logic: Breaking Ground between Philosophy and the Earth Sciences, Robert Frodeman Suny 2003

 

Philosophy & Geography Volume 6, Number 1 February 2003

Toward an ethics of the domesticated environment pp. 3 - 14 Roger J. H. King: This essay articulates the importance of the domesticated landscape for a mature environmental ethics. Human beings are spatial beings, deeply implicated in their relationships to places, both wild and domesticated. Human identity evolves contextually through interaction with a "world." If this world obscures our perception of wild nature, it will be difficult to motivatethe social and psychological will to imagine, let alone participate in, a culture that values environmentally responsible conduct. My argument is informed by a pragmatist suspicion of fixed\dualisms separating humans from nature, the wild from the domesticated, and the natural from the artificial. Drawing on a variety of sources, the essay calls for greater attention to the ways in which the making of our domesticated worlds can contribute to or undermine our ability to take the intrinsic value of nature seriously.

 

Philosophy & Geography Volume 6, Number 1 February 2003

On wilderness and people: a view from Mount Marcy1 pp. 15 - 32 Wayne Ouderkirk

Wetland gloom and wetland glory pp. 33 - 45 J. Baird Callicott

Colonization, urbanization, and animals pp. 47 - 58 Clare Palmer: Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power relations can exist in urban areas, not all of which are examples of human domination. The paper concludes by raising a number of questions about the implications of these human/animal relations.

 

Wendell Berry, 2000 Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Supersitition, Couterpoint, Wash DC

 

Peter List (ed.), Environmental Ethics and Forestry: a Reader. (Temple UP, 2000). This is an excellent example of philosophy engaging practical conservation issues. It includes work by philosophers and foresters, discusses changes to the SAF code, etc.

 

E.O. Wilson, “The Biological Basis of Morality,” The Atlantic Monthly vol 281, 4 53-70.

 

Mapping Human History, by Steve Olson Convocation book CofC fall 2003

 

Larry May, Masculinity and Morality, Cornell 1998

 

Mark Timmons, An Introduction to Morality, Rowman and Littlefield 2002

 

David I. Theodoropoulos who is a member of the Society for Economic Botany is titled "Invasion Biology: Critique of a Pseudoscience" published 2003 by Avvar Books, 15245 Broadway Street, Blythe, California 92225 USA

 

Gary Comstock, Subsistence Hunting, in Sapontzis volume.

 

Eric Higgs, Nature by Design: People, Natural Process, and Ecological Restoration, MIT press 2003.

 

Eric Higgs, What is Good Ecological Restoration, Conservation Biology Spring 1997

 

Brian Czech, Shoveling Fuel for a Runaway Train: Errant economists, shameful spenders, and a plan to stop them all, U of Calif Press, 2000 Chapter titles Economic Growth as National Gaol, steady state revolution, prologue a wilderness tail to an economic tale.

 

 

Mark A. Michael, Preserving Wildlife, Humanity Books 2002 includes medical treatment of wild animals, ethical considerations and animal welfare in eco field studies, Olympic goat controversy, captive breeding of endangered species, how to save African wildlife, elephants and economics, tourism as sustained use of wildlife. I have

 

David Ehrenfeld, Swimming Lessons: Keeping Afloat in the Age of Technology, Oxford 2002 I have.

 

Wayne Ouderkirk and Jim Hill, Land Value, Community: Callicott and environmental philosophy, SUNY 2002

 

Fatal Harvest: The tragedy of industrial agriculture, coffee table sized book, from the center for food safety, ed. By Andrew Kimbrell Island press 2002, foundation of deep ecology, Beautiful book. Includes Wendell Berry, norberg-hodge, farming as if nature mattered, , vandan shiva

 

Welfare Ranching: The subsidized Destruction of the American West, ed. George Wuerthner Island Press 2002.

 

 American Heat: Ethical Problems With the United States Response to Global Warming

 By Donald A. Brown Published by Roman and Littlefield ISBN 0742512959

in library C of C Stacks QC981.8.G56 B75 2002

 

 


ON ANWR

 

  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Potential Impacts of Proposed Oil & Gas Development on the

Arctic Refuge's Coastal Plain: Historical Overview and Issues of Concern

 

John Strohmeyer, "The New Battle," Chapter 19 from Extreme Conditions: Big Oil and the Transformation of Alaska

 

  John G. Mitchell, "Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Oil Field or Sanctuary?" National Geographic(August 2001)

 

 Gwich'in Steering Committee web page (and linked pages)

 

Sandra Hinchman, Endangered Species, Endangered Culture: Native Resistance to Industrializing the Arctic In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, janet, comps., 2001. Seventh World Wilderness Congress symposium: science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values; 2001 November 2-8; Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Proceedings RMRS-P-000. Odgen, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. Sandra Hinchman is Professor of Government at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, 13617 U.S.A., Fax: 315-229-5819, e-mail: shinchman@stlawu.edu. Available on the web at: http

 

 

Derr, Patrick G. and McNamara, Edward M., Case Studies in Environmental Ethics. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2003. 43 cases, typically 3-4 pages each. Hawaiian feral pigs, oil and ANWR, golden rice, Bhopal, monkey-wrenching, great apes, the Delhi Sands fly, and a host of others. Useful for discussion groups in classes in environmental ethics. Derr is in philosophy, Clark University. McNamara is an attorney. (v.14, #4)

 

Grunwald, Michael, "Departmental Differences Show Over ANWR Drilling," Washington Post (10/19/01): A1. ANWR debate rages on. Drilling for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) continues to be hotly contested. Proponents have recently been arguing for the drilling on national security grounds, as a way of lessening the U.S.'s dependence on foreign oil. Opponents of ANWR drilling argue that even if proponents are right that there is a 2-3 year U.S. supply of oil there (rather than the 6 month supply the opponents claim), the oil won't be available for years. Opponents also argue that raising automobile fuel efficiency standards would save us more oil overall and sooner. At recent Congressional hearings, U.S. Interior Secretary Gale Norton was accused by opponents of slanting her testimony about whether or not drilling would affect the Porcupine Caribou Herd which uses ANWR's coastal plain (where the oil is) to calve. Norton had asked Interior's own Fish and Wildlife Service for information on this issue and then selected only that part of their report that suited her pro-drilling purposes. She also cited a peer-review caribou study that concluded oil development would have no impact on the caribou. Opponents argued that the study was funded by BP Exploration (British Petroleum is one of the companies hoping to drill in ANWR). Given the conflicting studies, it seems reasonable to assume that we do not know how significantly the Porcupine Herd would be affected by oil development. But this uncertainty can itself be seen as a reason to forgo this development. Alaska's Gwich'in Indians continue to hunt this herd as part of a largely subsistence way of life. Significant disturbance of these caribou would threaten their cultural survival. Even a small chance of causing cultural genocide would seem to be enough to prohibit an optional activity of this sort. For a helpful discussion of the ANWR debate, see Sandra Hinchman, "Endangered Species, Endangered Culture: Native Resistance to Industrializing the Arctic" paper given at Seventh World Wilderness Congress, November 2-8, 2001, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Paper available from Hinchman at shinchman@stlawu.edu. Hinchman is Professor of Government at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York. (v.12,#4)

 

Kaiser, Jocelyn, "Caribou Study Fuels Debate on Drilling in Arctic Refuge," Science 296(19 April 2002):444-445. Caribou study fuels debate on drilling in Arctic refuge. The US Department of Interior, US Geological Survey, released a report that said oil drilling would harm caribou in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), a report that came out on the eve of a Senate vote on drilling. But a week later there was a hastily done addendum, with revised conclusions. Some interpreted this as Interior Secretary Gail Norton manipulating science to promote the Bush Administration's views. Other scientists say the first report was based on a larger drilling area, which has since been reduced in size, and hence the addendum. Also the debate turns not only on where the caribou calve, but on where they then go to escape insects. Meanwhile other geologists note that best estimates are that drilling in ANWR would reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil from 62% to 60%, a drop in the bucket. (v.13,#2)

 

Rosenbaum, David, "Senate Deletes Higher Mileage Standard in Energy Bill," New York Times (3/14/02): A26; Rosenbaum, David, 'Two Sides Push on Arctic Oil, but Proposal Lacks Votes," New York Times (4/18/02), and Rosenbaum, David, "Senate Passes an Energy Bill Called Flawed by Both Sides," New York Times (4/26/02): A16. The issue of drilling for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge involved intense lobbying in the Senate. Since the House had approved the drilling and President Bush supports it, the Senate vote would decide the issue. Arctic Power, a multimillion dollar lobbying group funded mainly by the state of Alaska, sent Inupiat Eskimos to Washington to lobby the Senators in favor of drilling (and the economic development it would involve for some Native Alaskans). Stephen Moore, president of The Club for Growth, a fund-raising group for conservative political candidates, explained why conservatives see arctic drilling as a matter of principle: "There is a belief on the environmentalist side that we're running out of oil, that we have to conserve energy. I'm adamantly opposed to energy conservation. We're not running out. All we have to do is go out and find it and produce it." The League of Conservation voters, which publishes an annual scorecard of environmental votes, announced that the vote on drilling would count double, calling it a "litmus test on who favors a flawed energy policy that relies on fossil fuels." One Senator who was trying to promote a compromise of limited drilling in the Arctic for tougher fuel efficiency standards gave up when he realized environmental organizations would not budge in their opposition to drilling: "If you told the environmentalist we would end global warming once and for all in return for ANWR, they'd still say no." (v.13,#2)

 

 

Berger, Joel, Anne Holyman, and William Weber, "Perturbation of Vast Ecosystems in the Absence of Adequate Science: Alaska's Arctic Refuge," Conservation Biology 15(no.2, 2001 Apr 01): 539-. (v.12,#3)

 

Catton, Theodore, Inhabited Wilderness: Indians, Eskimos, and Natural Parks in Alaska. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1997. Focus in Glacier Bay, Denali, and Gates of the Arctic. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980 set aside ten national parks, nine of which allow Alaska natives, whites included, "customary and traditional" subsistence use. Catton is a historian for the Historical Research Associates, Missoula, MT. (v.10,#1)

 

Kaye, Roger, "The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: An Exploration of the Meanings Embodied in America's Last Great Wilderness," Wild Earth 9 (No. 4, Wint 1999): 92-. (v.11,#2)

 

Peepre, Juri and Jickling, Bob, eds. Northern Protected Areas and Wilderness. Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada: Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, and Yukon Conservation Society, 1994. 379pp. $20 softcover. The book is a lightly edited compilation of the presentations made at an international conference, November 1993 in the Yukon Territory, by a host of native people, resource professionals, educators, and activists--nearly all of them from the grassroots of the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of North America. The examination of the North by northerners provided the unique nature of the conference and gives value to this publication. (v7,#2)

 

Revkin, Andrew, "Hunting for Oil: New Precision, Less Pollution" New York Times (01/30/01): D1. New oil-drilling techniques that are environmentally less harmful. With the ongoing debate over whether to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, it may be useful to understand some of the new oil discovery and extraction technologies touted by industry as environmentally friendly. Instead of peppering the surface with wells over a broad area, new supercomputer simulations of the deep earth and new drilling equipment allow wells to be constructed on small gravel pads with drills branching out underground for four or five miles following thin layers containing oil. Instead of waste pits that overflow with drilling mud, contaminated water, spilled oil, and discarded chemicals, waste, garbage, and rock cuttings can now be ground into a slurry and pumped into the ground 2000 feet beneath the 2000 foot-thick permafrost. Roads that were once built of gravel mined from river beds and that spread far and wide on the fragile tundra can now be built from ice (either from water pumped from tundra ponds or from ice scraped from ponds and laid down like gravel). Ice roads melt away in the spring thaw and leave few traces. Even the maze of pipelines which are an unavoidable means of collecting the oil can be raised to allow animals to duck underneath and are punctuated with elevated elbows so that less oil is spilled if one section is punctured. Both sides agree that the new surveying techniques are a mixed blessing environmentally. Although no longer using dynamite, the new three-dimensional seismic technology that performs ultrasound on the earth involves the use of vibrating 10-ton vehicles that do not travel on ice roads but crisscross the open tundra in a much more intensive way than with the old surveying techniques. Scars are left on the tundra and there is a greatly increased chance of encountering and disrupting wildlife. The new surveying techniques have raised the success rate from 1 producing well for each 10 exploratory wells to 5 in 10. One environmental critic responding to the elaboration of these new technologies says that once the work shifts from exploration to extraction of oil, the result is always a sprawl of pipelines, roads, crew quarters, and fuel depots: "In the end, even with all this technology, you've got a massive industrial complex."

 

END ON ANWR

 

Why restore wolves? http://www.defenders.org/pubs/pfw04.html

 

Callicott, J. Baird and Eugene C. Hargrove. "Leopold's `Means and Ends in Wild Life Management': A Brief Commentary." Environmental Ethics 12(1990):333-37. Leopold's lecture at Beloit College provides an important glimpse into his conversion from a philosophy of prudent scientific resource management to a land ethic and aesthetic. Leopold here advocates natural regulation not simply because of his growing concern that invasive management principles are limited, but also because of aesthetic considerations that were independent of his instrumental or "utilitarian" training at the Yale Forest School and in the U.S. Forest Service. The lecture is helpful in correcting an unfortunate misreading of Leopold's famous essay, "The Land Ethic," according to which the land ethic is interpreted as being based primarily on human welfare and self-interest. Callicott is in the department of philosophy, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens-Point, WI. Hargrove is in the department of philosophy, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas. (EE)

 

Why animal experimentation matters : the use of animals in medical research / edited by Ellen Frankel Paul and Jeffrey Paul. Introduction / Ellen Frankel Paul -- Experimental animals in medical research : a history / Kenneth F. Kiple, Kriemhild Conee Ornelas -- Making choices in the laboratory / Adrian R. Morrison -- Basic research, applied research, animal ethics, and an animal model of human amnesia / Stuart Zola -- The paradigm shift toward animal happiness : what it is, why it is happening, and what it portends for medical research / Jerrold Tannenbaum -- Defending animal research : an international perspective / Baruch A. Brody -- A Darwinian view of the issues associated with the use of animals in biomedical research / Charles S. Nicoll, Sharon M. Russell -- Animals : their right to be used / H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. / Justifying animal experimentation : the starting point / R. G. Frey.

 

Moral and Political Reasoning in Environmental Practice, edited by Andrew Light and Avner de-Shalit (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2003). Introduction: Environmental Ethics - Whose Philosophy? Which Practice? Andrew Light & Avner de-Shalit Part I: Political Theory and Environmental Practice 1. Political Theory and the Environment: Nurturing a Sustainable Relationship Michael Freeden 2. Intuition, Reason, and Environmental Argument Mathew Humphrey 3. The Justice of Environmental Justice: Reconciling Equity, Recognition, and Participation in a Political Movement David Schlosberg Part II: Philosophical Tools for Environmental Practice 4. Constitutional Environmental Rights: A Case for Political Analysis Tim Hayward 5. Trusteeship: A Practical Option for Realizing our Obligations To Future Generations? William Griffith 6. Ecological Utilisation Space: Operationalizing Sustainability Finn Arler 7. The Environmental Ethics Case for Crop Biotechnology: Putting Science Back into Environmental Practice Paul B. Thompson 8. Yew Trees, Butterflies, Rotting Boots and Washing Lines: The Importance of Narrative Alan Holland & John O'Neill Part III: Rethinking Philosophy Through Environmental Practice 9. The Role of Cases in Moral Reasoning: What Environmental Ethics Can Learn from Biomedical Ethics Robert Hood 10. Grab Bag Ethics and Policymaking for Leaded Gasoline: A Pragmatist's View Vivian E. Thomson11. Animals, Power and Ethics: The Case of Fox Hunting Clare Palmer & Francis O'Gorman 12. Ethics, Politics, Biodiversity: A View From the South Niraja Gopal Jayal

 

Johnson, Lawrence E., "Future Generations and Contemporary Ethics," Environmental Values 12(2003): 471-487. Future generations do not exist, and are not determinate in their make-up. The moral significance of future generations cannot be accounted for on the basis of a purely individualistic ethic. Yet future generations are morally significant. The Person-Affecting Principle, that (roughly) only acts which are likely to affect particular individuals are morally significant, must be augmented in such a way as to take into account the moral significance of Homo sapiens, a holistic entity which certainly does exist. Recent contributions to Environmental Values by Alan Carter and Ernest Partridge are criticised (but not entirely rejected). (EV)

 

 

Barry Lopez, Richard Nelson, and Terry Tempest Williams. _Patriotism and the American Land_. The New Patriotism Book Series. Great Barrington, Mass.: The Orion Society, 2002. 90 pp. Foreword. $8.00 (paper), ISBN 0-913098-61-2

 

Life science ethics, Gary Comstock, editor (Ames: Iowa State Press, 2002)

Preface PART 1. ETHICAL REASONING Chapter 1. Ethics Gary Comstock Chapter 2. Religion Gary Comstock Chapter 3. Reasoning Lilly-Marlene Russow Chapter 4. Method Gary Comstock
PART 2. LIFE SCIENCE ETHICS Chapter 5. Environment Lilly-Marlene Russow Chapter 6. Food Hugh LaFollette and Larry May Chapter 7. Animals Gary Varner Chapter 8. Land Paul Thompson Chapter 9. Biotechnology Fred Gifford Chapter 10. Farms Charles Taliaferro
PART 3. CASE STUDIES Chapter 11. Environment A. "Rare Plants," by Lynn G. Clark B. "Marine Mammal Protection," by Donald J. Orth Chapter 12. Food A. "Infant Deaths in Developing Countries," by Lois Banta, Jeffrey Beetham,Donald Draper, Nolan Hartwig, Marvin Klein, Grace Marquis B. "Edible Antiobiotics in Food Crops," by Mike Zeller, Terrance Riordan, Halina Zalenski, Dean Herzfeld and Kathryn Orvis Chapter 13. Animals A. "Beef, Milk, and Eggs," by Gary Varner B. "Veterinary Euthanasia," by Bernard Rollin, Jerrold Tannenbaum, Courtney Campbell, Kathleen Moore, and Gary Comstock Chapter 14. Land A. "Hybrid Corn," by Jochum Wiersma, Don Duvick, Deon Stuthman, David Fan, and Victor Konde B. "Trait Protection System," by Thomas Peterson and Bryony Bonning Chapter 15. Biotechnology A. "Golden rice," by Kristen Hessler, Ross Whetten, Carol Loopstra, Karen Pesaresi Penner, Sharon Shriver, Robert Zeigler, Jacqueline Fletcher, Melanie Torrie, and Gary L. Comstock B. "Organ transplantation," by Christopher Baldwin, David Bristol, Emily Deaver,Bruce Hammerberg, Carole A. Heath, Surya Mallapragada, Gavin J. Naylor, Elaine Richardson, and Jim Wilson Chapter 16. Farms A. "Lost in the Maize," by Isabel Lopez-Calderon, Steven Hill, L. Horst Grimme, Michael Lawton, and Anabela M. L. Romano B. "Magnanimous Iowans," by Ricardo Salvador, Stephen Moose, Bruce Chassy, and Kathie Hodge Notes for Instructors Index http://shop.store.yahoo.com/isupress/081382835x.html

 

COURTENAY-HALL, Pamela. “Body Hair, Building Bridges, and the Project of Deconstructing Femininity,” - presented to the Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (main program), Louisville, Kentucky, April, 1992. Commentator: Sandra Lee Bartky I have a copy

 

The Importance of Species: Perspectives on Expendability and Triage Edited by Peter Kareiva and Simon A. Levin Princeton U. Press ISBN: 0-691-09005-X

 

One other thing. I just read this cool paper that is a must read for you. It is in ecological applications 2002 12(2):321-334. by Yrjo Haila "A conceptual geneology of fragmentaion reserach from island biogeography to landscape ecology". Paul Mariono

 

Robert Blumenschine and John Cavallo, “Scavenging and Human Evolution,” Scientific American (October 1992), pp. 90-96. I have.

 

 Alison Jaggar and Iris Young, A Companion to Feminist Philosophy, blackwell 1998. I have and in library.

 

James Sterba, Controversies in Feminism. Rowman and Littlefield, 2001. I have.

 

Marilyn Pearsall, Women and Values, 3rd edition Wadsworth 1999. I have not in library

 

 

Bruce Morito (2002) Thinking Ecologically: Environmental Thought, Values

and Policy (Halifax, N.S.: Fernwood Publishing) price C$27.95.

 

Frederik Kaufman, "Speciesism and the Argument From Misfortune," Journal of

Applied Philosophy, 15 (2) 1998; pp. 155-163. I have.

 

Gary Varner, Personhood, Memory and Elephant Management http://www-phil.tamu.edu/~gary/elephants.pdf

 

Gary Varner, In what Sense are Persons not replaceable? Is replaceability a useful concept for a utilitarian. See his website.

 

 

Joan Ehrenfeld, Restoration Ecology 8,1 2000 pp. 2-9.

 

Cynthia Townley, Intellectual Property and Indigenous Knowledge, Philosophy and Public Affairs Quarterly, 22,4 Fall 2002. (

 

Title: Genetic Engineering and the Intrinsic Value and Integrity of Animals and Plants --Proceedings of a Workshop at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, UK. 18-21 September 2002 Edited by David Heaf & Johannes Wirz Published by Ifgene - International Forum for Genetic Engineering, December 2002 ISBN: 0-9541035-1-3 116 pages; 35 illustrations

 

Edwin C. Hettinger, "Justifying Intellectual Property," Philosophy and Public Affairs 18, no. 1 (Winter 1989): 31-52.

 

 

Alaine Lowe and Soraya Tremayne, eds. _Women as Sacred Custodians of the Earth?: Women, Spirituality and the Environment_. New York: Berghahn Books, 2001.

 

Gary Varner, Personhood, Memory and Elephant Management. I have a copy as an email attachment.

 

Gregory Pence, Designer food: Mutant Harvest or Breadbasket of the world? Rowman 2002 I have.

 

Gregory Pence, The Ethics of Food, anthology Rowman, 2002, I have includes Berry growing food reflects our virtues and vices, safety of gm food, benefits/dangers of organic, gm food an env. risk

 

Anthony Trewavas, “Much Food, Many Problems” Nature 402 231-232 w pages pro gm food and anti organic

 

"Great Yellow Hype" Michael Pollen New York Times Magazine March 4, 2001 Michael Pollan on Golden rice: http://www.biotech-info.net/yellow_hype.html

 

Michael Ruse and David Castle, eds., "Genetically Modified Foods: Debating Biotechnology" (Prometheus, 2002). I have. Michael Ruse and David Castle . .Editors. Introduction. Biotechnology Case Study: Golden Rice Kurt Eichenwald et al. . .Biotechnology Food: From the Lab to Debacle. Mary Lou Guerinot . .The Green Revolution Strikes Gold. Xudong Ye et al. . .Engineering the Provitamin A Pathway in Rice Endosperm. Greenpeace . .Genetically Engineered .Golden Rice. is Fool.s Gold. Ingo Potrykus . .Golden Rice and the Greenpeace Dilemma. Vandana Shiva . .Golden Hoax. Gordon Conway . .Open Letter to Greenpeace. Ethics in Agriculture Paul B. Thompson . .Bioethics in a Bio-Based Economy. Marc Saner, .Real and Metaphorical Moral Limits in the Biotech Debate. David Magnus and Arthur Caplan . .Food for Thought. Gary Comstock . .Ethics and Genetically Modified Foods. Religion Editors. Section Introduction Pope John Paul II . .Jubilee of the Agricultural World. Joe Perry . .Genetically Modified Crops. Carl Feit . .Genetically Modified Food and Jewish Law (Halakhah). Labeling Editors. Section Introduction William Safire . .Franken-. Peter Spencer . .Right to Know What?. Alan McHughen . .Uninformation and the Choice Paradox.Law Jack Wilson . .Intellectual Property Rights in Genetically Modified Agriculture: The Shock of the Not-So-New. Richard Gold . .Merging Business and Ethics: New Models for Using Biotechnological Intellectual Property. Keith Culver . .Returning to Normal. Food Safety and Substantial EquivalenceNick Tomlinson . .The Concept of Substantial Equivalence. Henry Miller . .Substantial Equivalence: Its Uses and Abuses. Bob Buchanan . .Genetic Engineering and the Allergy Issue. Risk Assessment and Public Perception Gabrielle Persley et al. . .Applications of Biotechnology to Crops: Benefits and Risks. Ambuj Sagar et al. . .The Tragedy of the Commoners: Biotechnology and its Publics. Wolfgang van den Daele . .Risk Prevention and the Political Control of Genetic Engineering. Precautionary Principle and Genetically Modified Foods Florence Dagicour . .Protecting the Environment: From Nucleons to Nucleotides. Indur Goklany . .Applying the Precautionary Principle to Genetically Modified Crops. Henry Miller and Gregory Conko . .Precaution without principle. Developing Countries Editors. Section Introduction Robert Tripp . .Twixt Cup and Lip. Florence Wambugu . .Why Africa Needs Agricultural Biotech. Calestous Juma and Karen Fang . .Bridging the Genetic Divide. Assessing Environmental Impacts Norman Ellstrand . .When Transgenes Wander, Should We Worry?. Les Firbank and Frank Forcella . .Genetically Modified Crops and Farmland Biodiversity. Anthony Trewewas . .Much Food, Many Problems

            Dawkins response to prince of Wales at beginning of book looks good

            Unit on Goldern Rice, including Vandana Shiva and Greenpeace and a good response by Gordan Conway of Rockfeller foundation

 

Democracy & Nature Issue: Number 3/November 01, 2002 Pages: 439 - 465 Biotechnology, Ethics and the Politics of Cloning Steven Best , Douglas Kellner:

 As the debates over cloning and stem cell research indicate, issues raised by biotechnology combine research into the genetic sciences,

 perspectives and contexts articulated by the social sciences, and the

 ethical and anthropological concerns of philosophy. Consequently, we

 argue that intervening in the debates over biotechnology require

 supradisciplinary critical philosophy and social theory to illuminate the

 problems and their stakes. More specifically, we will demonstrate

 problems with the cloning of animals that for now render the cloning of

 humans unacceptable. In addition, we take on arguments for and

 against stem cell research and contend that it contains positive potential

 for medical advances that should not be blocked by problematic

 conservative positions. Nonetheless, we believe that the entire realm of

 biotechnology is fraught with dangers and problems that require careful

 study and democratic debate of key ethical and political issues.

 

 

 

 

Wenz, Peter S. "Pragmatism in Practice: The Efficiency of Sustainable Agriculture." Environmental Ethics 21(1999):391-410. Bryan Norton advocates using the perspectives and methods of American pragmatism in environmental philosophy. J. Baird Callicott criticizes Norton's view as unproductive anti-philosophy. I find worth and deficiencies in both sides. On the one hand, I support the pragmatic approach, illustrating its use in an argument for sustainable agriculture. On the other hand, I take issue with Norton's claim that pragmatists should confine themselves to anthropocentric arguments. Here I agree with Callicott's inclusion of nonanthropocentric consideration. However, I reject Callicott's moral monism. In sum, I support pragmatic moral pluralism that includes nonanthropocentric values. (EE)

 Stone, Christopher D. 1995. What to Do About Biodiversity: Property Rights, Public Goods, and the Earth's Biological Resources. 68 Southern California Law Review 577.

 

Schlickeisen, Rodger. 2000. Protecting biodiversity for future generations: an argument for a constitutional amendment.

 

One World: The Ethics of Globalization. Singer, P. 2002. Yale University Press, New Haven, CN.235 pp. $21.95 (hard).ISBN 0-300-09686-0.

 

 

Ethical Issues in Biotechnology Richard Sherlock John Morrey Format: Hardcover, 368pp. ISBN: 0742513572 Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. I have. Including food biotech ethics, animal biotech humn genetic testing and therapy, cloning, ag biotech

 

Certified Organic Geoffrey Cowley With Anne Underwood and Karen Springen September 30, 2002 Newsweek


Biodiversity and Human Rights: The International Rules for the Protection of Biodiversity (Transnational Publishers, April 2002) by Elli Louka.

 

ANTHONY TREWAVAS Urban myths of organic farming 22 March 2001 Nature 410, 409 - 410 (2001); doi:10.1038/35068639 Organic agriculture began as an ideology, but can it meet today's needs?                        (a)On line at

http://www.fertile-minds.org/support/pdfs/nature_trewavas_organic.pdf

 

ANTHONY TREWAVAS Much food, many problems Nature 402, 231 - 232 (1999)

A new agriculture, combining genetic modification technology with sustainable

farming, is our best hope for the future.

 

JARED DIAMOND “Evolution, consequences and future of plant and animal domestication” Nature 418, 700 - 707 (2002); doi:10.1038/nature01019 (I have)

 

David Havlick, No Place Distant: Roads and Motorized Recreation on America's Public Lands (Island Press, 2002, ISBN 1-55963-845-1)

 

Ben Minteer and Robert Manning, “Pragmatism in Environmental Ethics: Democracy, Pluralism and the Management of Nature,” Environmental Ethics 21,2 (Summer 1999): 191-207.

 

Reed Noss, “On Characterizing Presettlement vegetation; how and why?” Natural Area Journal 5,1 1985.

 

John O’Neill, “Deliberative Democracy and Environmental Policy,” pp. 257-275 in Ben Minteer and Bob Taylor eds., Democracy and the Claims of Nature (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002)

 

Cary Coglianese, “Implications of Liberal Neutrality for Environmental Policy,” Environmental Ethics 21, 1 Spring 1998 40-59.

 

Andrew Vincent, “Liberalism and the Envrionment,” Environmental Values 7,4 November 1998 443-59.

 

David Schmidtz, “Natural Enemies: An Anatomy of Environmental Conflict” Env. Ethics 22, 4 (Winter 2000): p. 397-403 Importance of economics and having the luxury to care about the env. How people will put their families over wildlife.

 

 

 

Bryan Norton, “Pragmatism, Adaptive Management and Sustainability,” Environmental Values 8 1999 451-66.

 

 J. Baird Callicott, “After the Industrial paradigm what?” in Beyond the Land Ethic: More essays in Env. Philosophy.

 

David Ehrenfeld, Swimming Lessons: Keeping Afloat in an Age of Technology, Oxford 2001/2?

 

M.R. Smith Does tech drive history?

 

Hughs Technological momentum; Leo Marx eds, 1994.

 

Wendell Berry, Another Turn of the Crank (Counterpoint, 1995).

 

      Wendell Berry, Sex, Economy, Freedom,

      and Community: Eight Essays (Pantheon,

      1993).

 

      Herman E. Daly and John B. Cobb, Jr.,

      For the Common Good: Redirecting the

      Economy Toward Community, the

      Environment, and a Sustainable Future

      (Beacon, 1989).

 

      The Ecologist, Whose Common Future?

      Reclaiming the Commons (New Society

      Publishers and Earthscan Ltd., 1993).

 

      Bill Gates, with Nathan Myhrvold and Peter

      Rinearson, The Road Ahead (Viking,

      1995).

 

      Bob Goudzwaard and Harry de Lange,

      Beyond Poverty and Affluence: Toward an

      Economy of Care. Tr. Mark Vander Vennen

      (Eerdmans/WCC Publications, 1995).

 

      Wes Jackson, Becoming Native to This

      Place (Counterpoint, 1996).

 

Bill McKibben, Hope, Human and Wild: True Stories of Living Lightly on the Earth (New York: Little, Brown, and Company, 1995).

 

      Stephen V. Monsma, et al., Responsible

      Technology: A Christian Perspective

      (Eerdmans, 1986).

 

      Neil Postman, Technopoly: The Surrender

      of Culture to Technology (Alfred A. Knopf,

      1992).

 

      Kirkpatrick Sale, Rebels Against the Future:

      The Luddites and Their War on the

      Industrial Revolution: Lessons for the

      Computer Age (Addison-Wesley, 1995).

 

      Edward Tenner, Why Things Bite Back:

      Technology and the Revenge of

      Unintended Consequences (Alfred A.

      Knopf, 1996).

 

      William Vitek and Wes Jackson, eds.,

      Rooted in the Land: Essays on Community

      and Place (Yale Univ. Press, 1996)

 

Logsdon, Gene. At Nature's Pace. Foreword by Wendell Berry. New York: Pantheon Books, 1994. 208 pp. $23 hardbound. Formerly an editor for Farm Journal, Logsdon is an ardent

defender of the small traditional farm (the farm of fifty years ago), an honor he shares with Wendell Berry. Logsdon farms thirty acres in Ohio, and has written twelve books and hundreds

of articles. The small farm is not dead, he argues; rather, the future will have more farmers, not fewer. Farms will be ecologically sane and community-interdependent. The error of the

past was that farmers tried to live like city folks. The Amish have proved that farming is a decent living.

 

 

Robin Attfield, The Ethics of the Global Environment. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, and West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 1999.

 

From Rolston fall 2001 Natural Value course

 

Agar, Nicholas, "Biocentrism and the Concept of Life," Ethics 108(1997)147-168.

 

Anderson, M. Kat, "Tending the Wilderness," Restoration and Management Notes 14 (no. 2, Winter, 1996):154-166.

 

Attfield, Robin, "Saving Nature, Feeding People and Ethics," Environmental Values 7(1998):291-304.

 

Attfield, Robin, "The Good of Trees," Journal of Value Inquiry 15(1981):35-54.

 

Brennan, Andrew, "Poverty, Puritanism and Environmental Conflict," Environmental Values 7(1998):305-331.

 

Burhoe, Ralph, "On `Huxley's Evolution and Ethics in Sociobiological Perspective' by George C. Williams," Zygon 23(1988):417-430.

 

Callicott, J. Baird, "Rolston on Intrinsic Value: A Deconstruction," Environmental Ethics 14(1992):129-143.

 

Callicott, J. Baird, "La Nature est morte, vive la nature!" Hastings Center Report 22(no. 5, 1992):16-23.

 

Callicott, J. Baird, "A Critique of and an Alternative to the Wilderness Idea," Wild Earth 4 (no. 4, Winter 1994/1995):54-59.

 

J. Baird Callicott, “The Conceptual Foundations of the Land Ethic” in J. Baird Callicott, ed., Companion to A Sand County Almanac (Madison: Univ of Wisconsin Press, 1987), pp. 186-217. Also in Callicott, J. Baird. In defense of the land ethic : essays in environmental philosophy / J. Baird Callicott. In our library: GF80C351989

 

Callicott, J. Baird, "Deep Grammar" (response to responses), Wild Earth 5 (no. 1, Spring 1995):64-66.

 

Callicott, J. Baird, "The Wilderness Idea Revisited: The Sustainable Development Alternative," Environmental Professional 13(1991):235-247. Reprinted in Lori Gruen and Dale Jamieson, eds., Reflecting on Nature: Readings in Environmental Philosophy (New York: Oxford University Press), pages 254-264.

 

Carruthers, Peter, "Brute Experience," Journal of Philosophy 85(1989):258-269.

 

Cobb, John B, Jr., "Befriending an Amoral Nature" (response to Williams), Zygon 23(1988):431-436.

 

Cronon, William, "The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature," from William Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground: Toward Reinventing Nature (New York: W. W. Norton, 1996), pages 69- 90.

 

Evernden, Neil, "The Fragile Division" and "Nature and the Ultrahuman." Pages 88-103 and 107-124 in The Social Creation of Nature (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992).

 

Foreman, David, "Wilderness Areas Are Vital" (response), Wild Earth 4 (no. 4, Winter 1994/1995):64-68.

 

Fuller, B. A. G., "The Messes Animals Make in Metaphysics," Journal of Philosophy 46(1949):829-838.

 

Goodpaster, Kenneth E., "On Being Morally Considerable," Journal of Philosophy 75(1978):303-325.

 

Hargrove, Eugene C., "Weak Anthropocentric Intrinsic Value,"

 

Harlow, Elizabeth M., "The Human Face of Nature: Environmental Values and the Limits of Nonanthropocentrism," Environmental Ethics 14(1992):27-42.

 

Hettinger, Ned, "Comments on Holmes Rolston's `Naturalizing Values'." Pages 86-89 in Louis P. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, 3rd ed. (Belmont CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2001).

 

Hrdy, Sara Blaffer, "Comments on George Williams's Essay on Morality and Nature," Zygon 23(1988):409-411.

 

Jamieson, Dale and Mark Bekoff, "Carruthers on Nonconscious Experience," Analysis 52(no. 1, January 1992):25-28.

 

Johnson, Lawrence, "Do Animals Have an Interest in Life?" Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61(1983):172-184.

 

Kimmerer, "Native Knowledge for Native Ecosystems," Journal of Forestry 98(no. 8, August 2000):4-9.

 

Lee, Keekok, "Beauty for Ever?" Environmental Values 4(1995):213- 225. Keekok Lee, Beauty for ever, EV 4,3 aesthetic value is associated with pleasre and hedonistic, nathroponcentriv valuing of nature, says Emily Brady.

 

Lee, Keekok, "The Source and Locus of Intrinsic Value: A Reexamination," Environmental Ethics 18(1996):297-309.

 

Michael, Mark A., "How to Interfere With Nature," Environmental Ethics 23(2001):135-154.

 

Norton, Bryan, "Epistemology and Environmental Values" Monist 75(no. 2, April 1992):208-226.

 

Noss, Reed E., "Wilderness--Now More than Ever" (response), Wild Earth 4 (no. 4, Winter 1994/1995):60-63.

 

Hargrove, Eugene C., "Weak Anthropocentric Intrinsic Value," in Environmental Ethics: An Anthology ed. By Rolston and Light also in Monist 75(no. 2, April 1992)

 

O'Neill, John, "The Varieties of Intrinsic Value," Monist 75 (no. 2,) April 1992):119-137.

 

 

Partridge, Ernest, "Discovering a World of Values: A Response to Rolston". Pages 91-92 in Louis J. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, 2nd ed. (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1998).

 

Partridge, Ernest, "Values in Nature: Is Anybody There?" Philosophical Inquiry 8(1986):97-110. Reprinted, pages 81-88 in Louis J. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and

Application, 2nd ed. (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1998).

 

Partridge, Ernest, "Reconstructing Ecology." Pages 79-97 in David Pimentel, Laura Westra, and Reed Noss, eds., Ecological Integrity: Integrating Environment, Conservation, and Health

(Washington, DC: Island Press, 2000).

 

Preston, Christopher J., "Epistemology and Intrinsic Values: Norton and Callicott on Rolston," Environmental Ethics 29(1998):409-428.

 

Rolston, Holmes, "Disvalues in Nature," Monist 75 (no. 2, April 1992):250-278.

 

Rolston, Holmes, " People versus Saving Nature" Pages 248- 267 in William Aiken and Hugh LaFollette, eds., World Hunger and Morality, 2nd ed., Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996).

 

 

Ramachandra Guha, “The Authoritarian Biologist and the Arrogance of Anti-Humanism: Wildlife Conservation in the Third World,” The Ecologist, 27, 1, Jan/Feb, 1997 14-20. Response to rolston?

 

 

Attfield, Robin, "Saving Nature, Feeding People and Ethics," Environmental Values 7(1998):291-304. Response to Rolston?

 

Rolston, Holmes, "Naturalizing Values: Organisms and Species." Pages 76-86 in Louis P. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, 3rd ed. (Belmont CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2001).

 

Rolston, Holmes, "Nature for Real: Is Nature a Social Construct?" Pages 38-64 in T.D.J. Chappell, ed., The Philosophy of the Environment (Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, 1997). Available on line at: http://lamar.colostate.edu/~rolston/social-construct.pdf

 

Rolston, Holmes, "Saving Nature, Feeding People, and the Foundations of Ethics," Environmental Values 7(1998):349-357.

 

Rolston, Holmes, "The Wilderness Idea Reaffirmed," Environmental Professional 13(1991):370-377. Reprinted in Lori Gruen and Dale Jamieson, eds., Reflecting on Nature: Readings in Environmental Philosophy (New York: Oxford University Press), pages 265-278.

 

Rolston, Holmes, "Nature and Culture in Environmental Ethics." Pages 151-158 in Klaus Brinkmann, ed., Ethics: The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, vol. 1 (Bowling Green, Ohio: Philosophy Documentation Center, 1999).

 

Rolston, Holmes, "A Managed Earth and the End of Nature?" Pages 143-164 in Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino, Lester Embree, and Don E. Marietta, eds. The Philosophies of Environment and Technology, vol. 18 of Research in Philosophy of Technology (Stamford, CT: JAI Press, 1999).

 

Rolston, Holmes, III, "Value in Nature and the Nature of Value," Pages 13-30 in Robin Attfield and Andrew Belsey, eds., Philosophy and the Natural Environment (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).

 

Rolston, Holmes, III, "Values at Stake: Does Anything Matter? A Response to Ernest Partridge". Pages 88-90 in Louis J. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application,

2nd ed. (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1998).

 

Rolston, Holmes, III, "Natural and Unnatural: Wild and Cultural," Western North American Naturalist 61(no. 3, 2001):267-276.

 

Rolston, "F/Actual Knowing: Putting Facts and Values in Place," manuscript. Forthcoming in Christopher Preston, ed., Epistemology and Environment (Albany, SUNY Press, forthcoming).

 

Ruse, Michael, "Response to Williams: Selfishness is not Enough," Zygon 23(1988):413-416.

 

Sagoff, Mark, "Ethics, Ecology and the Environment: Integrating Science and Law," Tennessee Law Review 56(1988):77-229.

 

Sprugel, Douglas G., "Disturbance, Equilibrium, and Environmental Variability: What is `Natural' Vegetation in a Changing Environment?" Biological Conservation 58(1991):1-18.

 

Weir, Jack, "Are Animals Virtuous?" (manuscript)

 

Williams, George C., "Reply to Comments on `Huxley's Evolution and Ethics in Sociobiological Perspective,'" Zygon 23(1988):437-438.

 

Williams, George C., "Huxley's Evolution and Ethics in Sociobiological Perspective," Zygon 23(1988):383-407.

 

Williams, George C., "Mother Nature Is a Wicked Old Witch!" Pages 217-231 in Matthew H. Nitecki and Doris V. Nitecki, eds.,Evolutionary Ethics (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1995).

 

 

 

 

Denevan, William M., "The Pristine Myth: The Landscape of the Americas in 1492," and other essays in “The Americas Before and After 1492: Current Geographical Research,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 82 Or 80? (no. 3, 1992):369-385. The myth persists that in 1492 the Americans were a sparsely populated wilderness, "a world of barely perceptible human disturbance." There is substantial evidence, however, that the Native American landscape of the early sixteenth century was a humanized landscape almost everywhere. Populations were large. Forest composition had been modified, grasslands had been created, wildlife disrupted, and erosion was severe in places. Earthworks, roads, fields, and settlements were ubiquitous. With Indian depopulation in the wake of Old World disease, the environment recovered in many areas. A good argument can be made that the human presence was less visible in 1750 than it was in 1492. "There are no virgin tropical forests today, nor were there in 1492" (p. 375). Denevan is a geographer at the University of Wisconsin. (v6,#4)

 

Brennan, Andrew, "Environmental Awareness and Liberal Education," British Journal of Educational Studies 39(1991):270-296

 

Brian Barry, Sustainability and Intergenerational Justice in A. Dobson ed., Fairness and Futurity: Essays on Environmental Sustainability and Social Justice, Oxford 1999.

 

Minteer, Ben A., and Robert E. Manning. "Pragmatism in Environmental Ethics: Democracy, Pluralism, and the Management of Nature." Environmental Ethics 21(1999):191-207.

 

Jamieson, Dale, "Ethics, Public Policy and Global Warming," Science, Technology and Human Values 17(1992):139-153. Reprinted in Earl Winkler and Jerrold R. Coombes, eds., Applied Ethics: A Reader (Oxford: Blackwell, 1993).

 

Below From Sagoff paper on exotics?

 

G. Chichilinski and G Heal, 1998 Economic returns from the biosphere Nature 391 629-30.

A.K. Fizsimmons, 1999 Defending Illusions: Federal Protection of Ecosystems Rowman & Littliefield

K Jax, CG Jones, and STA Pickett, 1998 “The self-identity of ecological units, “ Oikos 82 253-264.

DC Schmitz and D. Simberloff, 1997 Biological invasions: A growing threat Issues in Science and Technology 13, 4 Summer 1997 33-41

D. Simberloff, 1998 “Flagships, umbrellas and Keystones: Is single species management passe in the landscape era?” Biological Conservation 83 3 247-257.

D. Simberloff et al 1999 Ruling out a community; assembly rule in Evan Weher and Paul Keddy eds. Ecological assembly Rules: Perspectives, Advances, Retreats, Cambridge 1999.

D. Tilman, Causes, consequences and ethics of biodiversity,” Nature 405 no 6783 (May 11): 208-12.

M Williamson, 1996 Biological Invasions, Chapman and Hall, London.

 

 

Below three given during USC talks on Exotics.

Gary Nabham, Cultures of Habitat 1997

Cary Fowler and Pat Mooney, (Shattering) Food Politics and Loss of Genetic Diversity

American Livestock Breeds Conservancy

 

Technology and the Contested Meaning of Sustainability By Aidan Davison. Albany, NY: State of University of New York Press, 2001. 275 pages, notes, index, no bibliography

 

Betsy Hartmann, Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control, South End Press (feminist critique of concern about population?)

 

Merrit Roe Smith and Leo Marx, eds., Does Technology Drive History?, MIT 1994, includes thomas Hughes, “Technological Momentum”.

 

Steven Wise, Drawing the Line: Science and the Case for Animal Rights, Perseus, 2002.

 

Steven Wise, Rattling the Cage: Towards Legal Rights for Animals, Profile Books/Perseus, 2000.

 

Tijs Goldschmidt, Darwin’s Dreampond, MIT press 1998, great example of species extinction after introduction of exotic species of Nile perch into Lake Victoria.

 

 

 

 

Environmental Ethics An Anthology Rolston and Light (Blackwell)

Introduction to the Volume: Ethics and Environmental Ethics.

  Part I: What is Environmental Ethics? An Introduction:

 1. "A Bibliographic Essay on Environmental Ethics": Clare Palmer.

2. "The Land Ethic": Aldo Leopold.

   3. "Do we Need a New, an Environmental Ethic?": Richard Sylvan.

   Part II: Who Counts in an Environmental Ethics? Animals? Plants? Ecosystems?

   4. "Not for Humans Only: The Place of Nonhumans in Environmental Issues": Peter Singer.

   5. "Animal Rights: What's in a Name?" Plus a brief extractfrom "The Case for Animal Rights": Tom Regan.

   6. "The Ethics of Respect for Nature": Paul Taylor.

   7. "Is There a Place for Animals in the Moral Considerationof Nature?": Eric Katz.

   8. "Can Animal Rights Activists Be Environmentalists?": Gary Varner.

   9. "Against the Moral Considerability of Ecosystems": Harley Cahen.

   Part III: Is Nature Intrinsically Valuable?

   10. "Varieties of Intrinsic Value": John O'Neill.

   11. "Value in Nature and the Nature of Value": HolmesRolston, III.

   12. "Source and Locus of Intrinsic Value": Keekok Lee.

   13. "Environmental Ethics and Weak Anthropocentrism": Bryan Norton.

   14. "Weak Anthropocentric Intrinsic Value": Eugene Hargrove.

   Part IV: Is There One Environmental Ethic? Monism versus Pluralism:

   15. "Moral Pluralism and the Course of Environmental Ethics": Christopher Stone.

   16. "The Case against Moral Pluralism": J. Baird Callicott.

   17. "Minimal, Moderate, and Extreme Moral Pluralism": Peter Wenz.

   18. "Callicott and Naess on Pluralism": Andrew Light. Part V: Reframing Environmental Ethics: What Alternatives Exist?

   Deep Ecology:

   19. "Deep Ecology: A New Philosophy of our Time?": Warwick Fox.

   20. "The Deep Ecology Movement: Some Philosophical Aspects": Arne Naess.

   Ecofeminism:

   21. "Ecofeminism: Toward Global Justice and Planetary Health": Greta Gaard and Lori Gruen.

   22. "Ecological Feminism and Ecosystem Ecology": Karren J. Warren and Jim Cheney.

   Environmental Pragmatism:

   23. "Beyond Intrinsic Value: Pragmatism in Environmental Ethics": Anthony Weston.

   24. "Pragmatism in Environmental Ethics: Democracy, Pluralism, and the Management of Nature": Ben A. Minteer and Robert E. Manning.

   Part VI: Focusing on Central Issues: Sustaining, Restoring, Preserving Nature: Is Sustainability Possible?

   25. "Sustainable Resources Ethics": Donald Scherer.

   26. "Toward a Just and Sustainble Economic Order": John Cobb.

   27. "Ethics, Public Policy, and Global Warming": Dale Jamieson.

   Can and Ought We Restore Nature?

   28. "Faking Nature": Robert Elliot.

   29. "The Big Lie: Human Restoration of Nature": Eric Katz.

   30. "Ecological Restoration and the Culture of Nature: A Pragmatic Perspective": Andrew Light.

   Should We Preserve Wilderness?

   31. "An Amalgmation of Wilderness Preservation Arguments": Michael P. Nelson.

   32. "A Critique of and an Alternative to the Wilderness Idea": J. Baird Callicott.

   33. "Wilderness -- Now More than Ever": Reed F. Noss.

   Part VII: What on Earth Do We Want? Human Social Issues and Environmental Values:

   34. "Feeding People versus Saving Nature": Holmes Rolston, III.

   35. "Saving Nature, Feeding People and Ethics": Robin Attfield.

   36. "Integrating Environmentalism and Human Rights": James W. Nickel and Eduardo Viola.

   37. "Environmental Justice: An Environmental Civil RightsValue Acceptable to All World Views": Troy W. Hartley. Hartley, Troy W. "Environmental Justice: An Environmental Civil Rights Value Acceptable to All World Views." Environmental Ethics 17(1995):277-289.

   38. "Sustainability and Intergenerational Justice": Brian Barry.

   39. "Democracy and Sense of Place Values in Environmental Policy": Bryan Norton and Bruce Hannon.

   40. "Environmental Awareness and Liberal Education": Andrew Brennan.

 

Robert Kirkman----SKEPTICAL ENVIRONMENTALISM:

THE LIMITS OF PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE (Katz wanted me to review).

 

Not the Cambridge UP book The Skeptical Environmentalist causing such an uproar. Sam Hines says that recent issue of Scientific American has responses to this book May 1, 2002 January 2002. Recently (Jan 02) Scientific American published "Misleading Math about the Earth," a series of essays that criticized Bjørn Lomborg's The Skeptical Environmentalist. Lomborg replies in the May 02 issue.

 

(Jan 02) Scientific American "Misleading Math about the Earth," a series of essays that criticized Bjørn Lomborg's The Skeptical Environmentalist. Lomborg replies in the May 02 issue. I found all this online. Sam also showed me a debate in The Skeptic 9,2, 2002 between Lomborg "The Real State of the World" and David Pimentel "Skeptical of the Skeptical Environmentalist".

 

 

 

 

"The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World,” by Michael Pollan. Random House, 2001.

 

Jack Wilson, Patenting Organisms: Intellectual Property Law Meets Biology” in Who Owns

Life?, David Magnus (ed.) MIT Press, 2002.

 

Jack Wilson, “Intellectual Property Rights in Agricultural Organisms: The Shock of the Not-So-New,” in Genetically Modified Food: Science, Religion, and Morality, Michael Ruse and David Castle (eds.) Prometheus Press, 2002

 

Jack Wilson, “Biotechnology Intellectual Property Rights—Bioethical Issues,” Encyclopedia of Life Science. Nature Publishing Group, London, forthcoming.

 

 

 

Philosophy and Geography Volume 5, Number 1/February 01, 2002 Pages:35 - 50 Wilderness, cultivation and appropriation John O'Neill Abstract:

 

  "Nature" and "wilderness" are central normative categories of

  environmentalism. Appeal to those categories has been subject to two

  lines of criticism: from constructivists who deny there is something called

  "nature" to be defended; from the environmental justice movement who

  point to the role of appeals to "nature" and "wilderness" in the

  appropriation of land of socially marginal populations. While these

  arguments often come together they are independent. This paper

  develops the second line of argument by placing recent appeals to

  "wilderness" in the context of historical uses of the concept to justify the

  appropriation of land. However, it argues that the constructivist line is less

  defensible. The paper finishes by placing the debates around wilderness

  in the context of more general tensions between philosophical

  perspectives on the environment and the particular cultural perspectives

  of disciplines like anthropology, in particular the prima facie conflict

  between the aspirations of many philosophers for thin and cosmopolitan

  moral language that transcends local culture, and the aspirations of

  disciplines like anthropology to uncover a thick moral vocabulary that is

  local to particular cultures.

 

Norton, Bryan G. Toward unity among environmentalists / Bryan G. Norton. New York : Oxford University Press, 1991.

 

Landres, Peter, Brunson, Mark W., and Merigliano, Linda, "Naturalness and Wildness: The Dilemma and Irony of Ecological Restoration in Wilderness," Wild Earth 10(no 4, Winter 2000/2001):77-82. The authors argue that restoration biology in wilderness areas (such as removing exotic weeds or high fuel loads from former fire suppression areas) interrupts the "wildness" ongoing there in order to restore the "naturalness." Managing to remove a disruption interrupts "wildness" to regain "naturalness," a dilemma. The possibility (semantically as well as empirically) that restoration biology restores both wildness and naturalness is not entertained. "Wildness" seems to require uninterrupted historical continuity while "naturalness" does not. Landres is an ecologist at the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Missoula, MT. Brunson is in forest resources, Utah State University, Logan. Merigliano is with the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Jackson, WY. (v.12,#4)

 

 McNeil, Jr., Donald G., "The Great Ape Massacre," New York Times Magazine, May 9, 1999, Section 6, pages 54-57. The bushmeat crisis in Africa.

 

Benatar, David. "Why the Naive Argument against Moral Vegetarianism Really is Naive," Environmental Values 10(2001):103-112. When presented with the claim of the moral vegetarian that it is wrong for us to eat meat, many people respond that because it is not wrong for lions, tigers and other carnivores to kill and eat animals, it cannot be wrong for humans to do so. This response is what Peter Alward has called the naive argument. Peter Alward has

defended the naive argument against objections. I argue that his defence fails. Keywords: Vegetarianism, naive argument. Benatar is at the Philosophy Department, University of Cape Town, South Africa. (EV)

 

Alward, Peter. "The Naive Argument Against Moral Vegetarianism." Environmental Values 9(2000):81-89. ABSTRACT: The naive argument against moral vegetarianism claims that if it is wrong for us to eat meant then it is wrong for lions and tigers to do so as well. I argue that the fact that such carnivores lack higher order mental states and need meat to survive do (not?) suffice to undermine the naive argument. KEYWORDS: Ethics, applied ethics, vegetarianism, animal welfare, naive argument. Peter Alward is in the Department of Philosophy College of

Charleston, Charleston, SC, 29424-0001.

 

Varner, Gary. "The Environmentalists' Conception of Harm to Others." In Larry D. White, ed., Private Property Rights and Responsibilities of Rangeland Owners and Managers, pp. 55-59. College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University, 1995. Proceedings from a conference of the Texas Section of the Society for Range Management. Eminent domain is used to secure some public good. Police power is used to prevent harm to others. Wetlands and endangered species legislation can be construed as designed to prevent harm to others, but some conceptual work here remains to be done. There is a need to draw better analogies with traditionally recognized public goods put in jeopardy by adverse land uses, also a need to stress the way general trends in land management can adversely affect ecological processes when the actions of private individuals would not. Varner teaches philosophy at Texas A&M University. (v6,#3)

 

Chappell, T. D. J. Chappell, ed., The Philosophy of the Environment. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997, and New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. 194 pages. Our library has full text online edition. Contains new as well as reprinted articles. Chappell teaches philosophy at the University of Manchester. Chappell, Timothy, "Respecting Nature--Environmental Thinking in the Light of Philosophical Theory," pages 1-18. Clark, Stephen R. L., "Platonism and the Gods of Place," pp. 19-37. Rolston, III, Holmes, "Nature for Real: Is Nature a Social Construct?", pp. 38-64. Hepburn, Ronald W., "Trivial and Serious in Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature," pp. 65-77. Haldane, John, "`Admiring the High Mountains': The Aesthetics of Environment," pp. 78-88. Midgley, Mary, "Sustainability and Moral Pluralism," pp. 89-101. Chappell, Timothy, "How to Base Ethics on Biology," pp. 102-116. Sprigge, Timothy L. S., "Respect for the Non-Human," pp. 117-134. Rawles, Kate, "Conservation and Animal Welfare," pp. 135-155. Callicott, J. Baird, "Whaling in Sand County: The Morality of Norwegian Minke Whale Catching," pp. 156-179. Jamieson, Dale, "Zoos Revisited," pp. 180-192. (v.8,#4

 

James Scarff: "Ethical Issues in Whale and Small Cetacean Management" Env. Ethics 2,3, 1980. Dolphins

 

 See People, Penguins and Plastic Trees which includes an article by Peter Dobra, “Cetaceans: A Litany of Cain” p. 127 also in the Boston College Env. Affairs Law Review 7 (1978): 165-83.

 

Shepherdson, David J., Mellen, Jill D. Hutchins, Michael, eds. Second Nature: Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997. 336 pp. $32.50. Moving beyond the usual studies of primates, contributors argue that whether an animal forages in the wild or plays computer games in captivity, the satisfaction its activity provides--rather than the activity itself--determines its level of physical and psychological well-being. (v8,#3)

 

Sapontzis, Steve F., Finsen, Susan, Bekoff, Marc. "Perspectives: Predator-Reintroduction Programs," The Animals' Agenda 15, no. 4 (Sept. 1995): 28- . Are there noble experiments in restitution or affirmative action programs that favor some species over others? Animal rights philosophers Steve F. Sapontzis and Susan Finsen, and scientist Marc Bekoff, debate the question. (v6,#4)

 

Sharpe, Virginia A., Norton, Bryan, Donnelley, Strachan. Wolves and Human Communities: Biology, Politics, and Ethics. 280 pages. Cloth $65. Paper $30. Contributors address the complex ethical, biological, legal, and political concerns surrounding wolf reintroduction. The social, cultural, and ecological values that come into play in the debate. (v.11,#4)

 

Arthur, John, ed., Morality and Moral Controversies, 3rd ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996, Bonnie Steinbock, "Speciesism and the Idea of Equality.”

 

Baird, Robert M., and Rosenbaum, Stuart E., eds. Animal Experimentation: The Moral Issues. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books, 1997. 182pp. $16.95 paper. A collection of 16 essays provides an introduction to the major normative, political, and cultural issues involved in the animal rights controversy. Contributors include: Carl Cohen Alan Freeman, J.A. Gray, Peter Harrison, Edwin Converse Hettinger,

 

Our next issue 5.1, of Philosophy and Geography features a new article by John O'Neil on wilderness.

 

Subject: Re: Cloning and Animals One of the people working on this, with folks like Prof. Ian Wilmut at the Roslin Institute, is Donald Bruce, of the Society Religiuon and Technology Project of the Church of Scotland - see his Earthscan book "Engineering Genesis: The SRT Study on the Ethics of Genetic Engineering in Animals, Plants and Micro-organisms". Details of SRT are at http://www.srtp.org.uk/srtpage3.shtml and of the the book at http

Environmental Disobedience: Ned Hettinger (College of Charleston) in Dale Jamieson, Companion to Environmental Philosophy, Blackwell Publishing 2001

 

Dale Jamieson, Companion to Environmental Philosophy, Blackwell Publishing 2001 CofC call number GE40 .C66 2001

List of Contributors.

Preface.

Part I: Cultural Traditions:

1. Indigenous Perspectives: Laurie Anne Whitt (Michigan Technological

University), Mere Roberts (University of Auckland), Waerete Norman

(University of Auckland), and Vicki Greives (Macquarie University).

2. Classical China: Karyn Lai (University of New South Wales).

3. Classical India: O. P. Dwivedi (University of Guelph).

4. Jainism and Buddhism: Christopher Key Chapple (Loyola Marymount

University).

5. The Classical Greek Tradition: Gabriella Carone (University of Colorado

At Boulder).

6. Judaism: Eric Katz (New Jersey Institute of Technology).

7. Christianity: Robin Attfield (Cardiff University).

8. Islam: S. Nomanul Haq (Rutgers University).

9. Early Modern Philosophy: Charles Taliaferro (St. Olaf College).

10. N ineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Philosophy: Andrew Brennan (The

University of Western Australia).

Part II. Contemporary Environmental Ethics:

11. Meta-Ethics: John O'Neill (Lancaster University).

12. Normative Ethics: Robert Elliot (University of The Sunshine Coast).

13. Sentientism: Gary Varner (Texas A&M University).

14. The Land Ethic: J. Baird Callicott (University of North Texas).

15. Deep Ecology: Freya Matthews (La Trobe University).

16. Ecofeminism: Victoria Davion (University of Georgia).

Part III: Environmental Philosophy and Its Neighbors:

17. Literature: Scott Slovic (University of Nevada, Reno).

18. Aesthetics: John Andrew Fisher (University of Colorado At Boulder).

19. Economics: A. Myrick Freeman III (Bowdoin College).

20. History: Ian Simmons (University of Durham).

21. Ecology: Kristin Shrader-Frechette (University of Notre Dame).

22. Politics: Robyn Eckersley (Monash University).

23. Law: Sheila Jasanoff (Harvard University).

Part IV: Problems In Environmental Philosophy:

24. Wilderness: Mark Woods (University of San Diego).

25. Population: Clark Wolf (University of Georgia).

26. Future Generations: Ernest Partridge (University of California,

Riverside).

27. Sustainability: Alan Holland (Lancaster University).

28. Biodiversity: Holmes Rolston, III (Colorado State University).

29. Animals: Peter Singer (Princeton University).

30. Environmental Justice: Robert Figueroa and Claudia Mills (Colgate

University and University of Colorado At Boulder).

31. Technology: Lori Gruen (Stanford University).

32 Climate: Henry Shue (Cornell University).

33. Land and Water: Paul B. Thompson ( Purdue University).

34. Consumption: Mark Sagoff (Institute For Philosophy and Publc Policy).

35. Colonization: Keekok Lee (University of Lancaster).

36. Environmental Disobedience: Ned Hettinger (College of Charleston).

 

The specter of speciesism, by Paul Waldau. It's a scholarly and readable account of the notion of speciesism especially within Buddhist and Christian traditions

 

The Onion (humorous magazine David Bennatar suggested) http://www.theonion.com/

 

A Pluto Press Catalogue Title Ecopolitics: Thought & Action http://www.plutopress.com/db/Ecopolitics.html

 

Jeff McMahan, The Ethics of Killing Oxford Dec 2001 2.507998-1

 

Man and the Natural World by Keith Thomas (Shaun says was excellent history of humans views about nature).

 

Val Plumwood, Environmental Culture : the Ecological Crisis of Reason ISBN 0415178789

DEC 2001 Paperback Book 304 pages )

 

The Ethics Connection, the Web site of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara

University, offers articles, cases, briefings, and dialogue in all fields of applied ethics. Our program areas include: Biotechnology and Health Care Ethics, K-12 Character Education, Business Ethics, Public Policy and Governmental Ethics, and Technology Ethics.

http://www.scu.edu/SCU/Centers/Ethics/

 

Robert D. Kaplan, The Coming Anarchy, February 1994 The Atlantic Monthly and book by same title. http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/foreign/anarcf.htm Sam Hines Rec.

 

Y.S. Lo, “A Humean Argument for the Land Ethic?” Env. Values 10, 4, November 2001 (a critique of Callicott on Is/Ought)

 

Sandra Hinchman, Endangered Species, Endangered Culture: Native Resistance to Industrializing the Arctic In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, janet, comps., 2001. Seventh World Wilderness Congress symposium: science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values; 2001 November 2-8; Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Proceedings RMRS-P-000. Odgen, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. Sandra Hinchman is Professor of Government at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, 13617 U.S.A., Fax: 315-229-5819, e-mail: shinchman@stlawu.edu. Available on the web at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_p027/rmrs_p027_077_084.pdf

 

M. Wackernagel and W.E. Rees, 1996 Our Ecological Footprint: Reducing Human Impact on the Earth, New Society Publishers, Gabriola Island, BC.

 

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, library will have a copy and I’ll get online.

 

 

Aidan Davison, Technology and the Contested Meanings of Sustainability, SUNY ISBN 791449807, 2001? In Library T14 .D29 2001

 

 

LaFollette, H. and Shanks, N., Brute Science: The Dilemmas of Animal Experimentation. London: Routledge, In library 1996.

 

 

'Capitalism, Democracy, and Ecology: Departing from Marx' by Timothy W. Luke 495 - 498 Timothy W. Luke Volume 7, Number 3 (dated November 2001) of: Democracy & Nature,

 

Carl Cohen and Tom Regan, The Animal Rights Debate, July 2001 0 8476 9663 4 Rowman and Littlefield I have.

 

Ronnie Hawkins, “Cultural Whaling, Commodification, and Cultural Change,” Environmental Ethics 23, 3 Fall 2001.

Martin Yaffe, Judaism and Environmental Ethics: A reader, May 2001 0-7391-0117-X $64 cloth.

 

 

ETHICS FOR EVERYDAY David Benatar, University of Cape Town, 0-07-240889-8 / 2002 / 928 pages, McGraw Hill

 

Jane Bennett, The Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings, and Ethics

http://www.pup.princeton.edu/titles/7208.html

 

Nicholas Agar's, "Life's Intrinsic Value: Science, Ethics, and Nature," Columbia U. Press. 2001 In library.

 

Xiaorong Li, “Tolerating the Intolerable: The case against Female genital mutilation, in Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly (QQ), p. 21,1, Winter 2001. 2-8.

 

Ethics of making the body beautiful, Cosmetic Genetics a and Cosmetic Surgery, Sara Goering, Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly (QQ), p. 21,1, Winter 2001.

 

Aidan Davison, Technology and the Contested Meanings of Sustainability, SUNY ISBN 791449807, 2001?

 

Environmental Connections A Teacher's Guide to Environmental Studies

ISBN 0787271055 Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company 2000.

 

 Classics in Environmental Studies: An Overview of Classic Texts in Environmental Studies isbn 9062249736 by Nelissen, Nico; Van der Straaten, Jan; Klinkers, Leon Publisher: Uitgeverij Jan van Arkel

 

Turk, Introduction to Environmental Studies Harcourt Brace College Publishers, Jan. 1998 ISBN

0030633893

 

 Notable Selections in Environmental Studies, Second Edition Theodore D. Goldfarb, SUNY--Stony Brook ISBN: 0-07-303186-0 ©2000 / Paper / 368 pages

 

Affluenza: The All-Consuming Epidemic by John DeGraff, David Wann, Thomas H. Naylor, Redefining Progress 2001 Berrett-Koehler ; ISBN: 1576751511

 

Sharing Nature's Interest : Ecological Footprints as an Indicator of Sustainability by Nicky Chambers, Craig Simmons, Mathis Wackernage 2001 Earthscan Pubns Ltd; ISBN: 1853837393

 

Return of the Wild: The Future of Our National Lands Editor: Ted Kerasote

 Island Press: 2001. $25.00 ISBN: 1-55963-926-1 Contributors including Vine Deloria, Jr., Chris Madson, JonMargolis, Richard Nelson, Thomas M. Power, Michael Souláa, Jack Turner, and Florence Williams consider a wide range of topics relating to wildlands, and explore the varied economic, spiritual, and ecological justifications for preserving wilderness areas.

 

Volume 4, Number 2 (dated August 2001) of: Philosophy and Geography, Wind, energy, landscape: reconciling nature and technology 169 - 184, Gordon G. Brittan Jr; Wilderness and the wise province: Benton MacKaye's pragmatic vision 185 - 202 Ben A. Minteer; Moving places: a comment on the traveling Vietnam Memorial 219 - 224 Ronald L. Hall

 

Ramachandra Guha, “The Authoritarian Biologist and the Arrogance of Anti-Humanism: Wildlife Conservation in the Third World,” The Ecologist, 27, 1, Jan/Feb, 1997 14-20.

 

Thomas Friedman, The Lexus and the Olive Tree (1999) argument for globalization from the New York Times foreign correspondent.

 

Vandana Shiva, The Violence of the Green Revolution: Third World Agriculture, Ecology, and Politics (Zed Books, London, 1991.

 

Volume 14, Number 6 (dated July 2001) of Society and Natural Resources, Global Inequality and Climate Change 501 - 509 J. Timmons Roberts

 

The Island Within, Richard Nelson (I have) (rec by Wayne OuderKirk about native world view).

 

John McNeill, Georgetown University Env. Historian, Something New Under The Sun: An Environmental History of the 20th Century World, Norton, 2000.

 

Technology and the Good Life by Eric Higgs (Editor), Andrew Light (Editor), David Strong 2000. Davis Baird thinks this is good. Reviewed in EE fall 2003. Possibly good says Ned: Intro by Higgs, Light, Strong, or Durbin’s short phil of tech retro and prospective views?? Or Thomas Power’s article “Trapped in Consumption: modern Social Structure and the Entrenchment of the Devise” (really about how economy traps people in consumption)

 

 

Cafaro, Philip, "Less is More: Economic Consumption and the Good Life." Philosophy Today 42(1998): 26-39. We should judge economic consumption on whether it improves or detracts from our lives, and act on that basis. The issue of consumption is placed in the context of living a good life, in order to discuss its justifiable limits. Two important areas of our economic activity, food consumption and transportation, are examined from an eudaimonist perspective. From the perspective of our enlightened self-interest, we see that when it comes to economic consumption, less is more. Not always, and not beyond a certain minimum level. But often, less is more; especially for the middle and upper class members of wealthy industrial societies. This is the proper perspective from which to consider environmentalists' calls for limiting consumption in order to protect nature. (v.9,#3)

 

Geoffrey Heal, Nature and the Marketplace, Island Press 2000. (Heard lecture, quite good)

 

Dorinda Dallmeyer, ed., Values at sea: Ethics for the Marine Env, U. of Georgia Press

 

Values and the future; the impact of technological change on American values. Edited by Kurt Baier and Nicholas Rescher. New York, Free Press [1969] HM221B27

 

Volume 4, Number 1 (dated February 2001) of: Philosophy and Geography a journal from Carfax Publishing, part of the Taylor & Francis Group is now available online via the Catchword service, and contains the following articles: Our new home 5 - 8 Andrew Light; On aesthetically appreciating human environments 9 - 24 Allen Carlson; Coercive population policies, procreative freedom, and morality 67 - 77 Juha Rääikk&auml; Is ecosabotage civil disobedience? 97 - 107 Jennifer Welchman

 

Thomas Young, “The Morality of Ecosabotage,” Environmental Values 10, 3, 2001.

 

Robert Wachbroit, “Genetic Encores: The Ethics of Human Cloning,” Philosophy and Public Policy 17, 4, Fall 1997.

 

Good looking section on human genetic engineering and cloning: Thomas Mappes and David DeGrazia, eds., Biomedical Ethics (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2001).

 

Michael Soule, “Does Sustainable Development Help Nature,” Wild Earth Winter 00-01 Vol 10, #4.

 

Peter Landres et al., Naturalness and Wildness: The Dilemma and Irony of Ecological Restoration in Wilderness Wild Earth Winter 00-01 Vol 10, #4.

 

Charisse Sydoriak et al., Would Ecological Restoration Make the Bandelier Wilderness More or Less of a wilderness? Wild Earth Winter 00-01 Vol 10, #4.

 

Bruce Babbitt on Dam removal, Spring 2000 Orion Afield.

 

Tibbetts on Ecological restoration, Coastal Heritage 14, 3, Winter 99-00, good for es studies, talks about Francis Marion Forest.

 

Good stuff on Green Business in Amicus Summer 1998; use of ES or Bus Ethics.

 

Sierra on Winonna LaDuke, Dec 1996

 

Ecologically sensitive Spirituality Earth Ethics 8, 1 Fall 96.

 

Sagoff on “Controlling Global Climate: Debate over Pollution Trading” 19, 1 Philosophy and Public Policy Winter 1999. For ES or BE

 

Erik Parens, ed. Enhancing Human Traits: Ethical and social Implications, Georgetown U. Press 288. Get for Library

 

Disability rights in sports and education (on PGA golfer), evaluating technologies of human enhancement, ethical appraisal of Ritalin, Public Deliberation and Scientific expertise Robert Wachbroit PPP 18, 4 Fall 1998

 

Sagoff’s criticism in PPP Summer 97 17, #3 of Constanza et all: “Can we put a price on nature’s services For ES

 

George Session’s response to William Cronon’s Common Ground, 13, 1 1996

 

Env Advocacy by Env. Scientists, series of articles by Rolston, list, Shrader-Frechette, Westra in Reflections, Newsletter of Phil Dept Oregon State, in file on advocacy, along with Ehrenfeld on Env. protection and experts.   use for es studies

 

What’s in a Risk, Robert Wachbroit, PPP Winter 91, okay on risk communication.

 

David Ehrenfeld, “Environmental Protection: The expert’s dilemma” Report from the Institute of Philosophy and Public Affairs, Spring 1991 good on activism for scientists, and about neutrality in science.

 

Kristin Shradder-Frechette, Risk and Rationality, U. of Calif. Press, 1991.

 

Precautionary Principle

 

Implementing the Precautionary Principle: Perspectives and Prospects Edited by Elizabeth Fisher, Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford, UK, Judith Jones, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia and René von Schomberg, Directorate General for Research, European Commission Edward Elgar publishing, Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, US: June 2006, 352 pages, ISBN 13 978 184542 702 3

Two articles in Env. Values, 13,4 Nov 2004 : “The Lack of Clarity in the Precautionary Principle by Derek Turner and Lauren Hartzell and “The Precautionary Principle and the Concept of Precaution” by Per Sandin”

 

Michael Pollan on Precautionary principle NY Times Magazine Dec 9 2001

 

Johnathan Adler, Precaution can be a dangerous toul, from Perc.

 

Richard Sherlock, Two Approaches to the Precationary Principle, draft I have.

As part of the Precautionary Principle Project (P3), a project of the University of Redlands, I am serving as the Guest Editor for a special issue of the International Journal of Global Environmental Issues that will focus on the Principle. The deadline for submission of first drafts will be March 1, 2004. Prospective contributors are asked to submit abstracts by December 15. Thanks. William C.G. Burns, Co-Chair American Society of International Law - Wildlife Interest Group 1702 Arlington Blvd. El Cerrito, CA 94530 USA Ph: 650.281.9126

 

Michael Ruse and David Castle, eds., "Genetically Modified Foods: Debating Biotechnology" (Prometheus, 2002). I have. Includes unit on Precautionary Principle and Genetically Modified Foods both pro and con

 

Neil Manson, “Formulating the Precautionary Principle, Env. Ethics 24,3 Fall 2002

Neil Manson, The Precationary Pinricple, The Catastrophe Argument, and Pascal’s Wager, I have, on line a University of Aberdeen Dept of Philosophy.

 

John Francis, “Nature Conservation and the Precautionary Principle,” Environmental Values 5, 3, 1996 257-64.

Carolyn Raffensperger and Joel Tinckner, eds., Protecting Public Health and the Environment: Implementing the Precautionary Principe (Island Press, 1999).

 

Adler, Jonathan H., "Banning `Biofoods': Precaution Can Be a Dangerous Tool," PERC Reports (Bozeman, MT) 17 (no. 4, September):8-9. Genetically engineered foods hold great promise, and it is more risky to ban them. In general the precautionary principle is being misused. "The idea behind the precautionary principle is that it is always better to be safe than sorry. In fact, however, adopting the precautionary principle is likely to make us more sorry than safe." Adler is a Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington, DC. (v.10,#3

 

ORiordan (O'Riordan), Timothy, and Cameron, James, eds. Interpreting the Precautionary Principle. London: Earthscan Publications, Ltd., 1994. 315 pages. They have an article in Env. Values too.

 

Parker, Jenneth. "Precautionary Principle" in Chadwick, Ruth, editor-in-chief, Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. 4 volumes. San Diego: Academic Press, 1997.


 

 

Chadwick, Ruth, editor-in-chief, Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. 4 volumes. San Diego: Academic Press, 1997. Contains, among others, the following articles: (alphabetically by entry title) (In our library)

--Mepham, Ben, "Agricultural Ethics"

--Parascandola, Mark, "Animal Research"

--Pluhar, Evelyn. "Animal Rights"

--Rawles, Kate. "Biocentrism"

--Lee, Keekok. "Biodiversity"

--Leopold, Aldo Carl. "Conservation (Stewardship)"

--Munz, Peter. "Darwinism"

--Talbot, Carl. "Deep Ecology"

--Dower, Nigel. "Development Ethics"

--Dower, Nigel. "Development Issues"

--Holland, Alan. "Ecological Balance"

--Burritt, Roger. "Environmental Compliance by Industry"

--Sagoff, Mark. "Environmental Economics"

--Attfield, Robin. "Environmental Ethics, Overview"

--Jarvela, Marja. "Environmental Impact Assessment"

--Talbot, Carl. "Environmental Justice"

--MacDonald, Chris. "Evolutionary Perspectives in Ethics"

--Brennan, Andrew. "Gaia Hypothesis"

--Valadez, Jorge. "Indigenous Rights"

--Booth, Annie L. "Land-Use Issues"

--Mori, Maurizio. "Life, Concept of"

--Daffern, Thomas. "Native American Cultures"

--Allen, Garland E. "Nature vs. Nurture"

--ShraderFrechette (Shrader-Frechette). Kristin. "Nuclear Power"

--Ryder, Richard. "Painism"

--Clark, John P. "Political Ecology"

--Parker, Jenneth. "Precautionary Principle"

--Christman, John. "Property Rights"

--Carpenter, Robert Stanley. "Sustainability"

--Kaplan, Helmut. "Vegetarianism"

--Rollin, Bernard E. "Veterinary Ethics"

--Spash, Clive L. "Wildlife Conservation"

--Dower, Nigel. "World Ethics"

--Bostock, Stephen. "Zoos and Zoological Parks"

 

David R. Keller and Frank Golley, The Philosophy of Ecology 2000 (I have).

 

Peter Wenz, Environmental Ethics Today Oxford 2001 (I have).

Alan Carter, A RADICAL GREEN POLITICAL THEORY (London and New York: Routledge, 1999), pp. xviii + 409.

 

Conservatism and env. ethics, vol 19, #2 Env. Ethics

 

On possibility of animals being moral agents:

            Roger Fouts, Next of Kin: What Chimpanzees Have Taught Me about who we Are1977, Jeffrey Masson and Susan McCarthy,When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Lives of Animals, 1995.

 

Restoring What's Environmental About Environmental Law in the Supreme Court, Richard J. Lazarus
UCLA Law Review February 2000, vol. 47, iss. 3

 

Andrew McLaughlin, “For a Radical Ecocentrims” (in student’s paper)

 

Listening to the Wilderness: The Life and Work of Sigurd F. Olson -- pg. 323 - 329 , William P. Cunningham, Volume 3, Number 3 of: Ethics, Place and Environment Fall 2000?

 

Affective Approaches to Environmental Education: Going beyond the Imagined Worlds of Childhood? -- pg. 253 - 268, Rachel Gurevitz, Volume 3, Number 3 of: Ethics, Place and Environment Fall 2000?

 

Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Introduction -- pg. 303 - 309 John Silk and Caring at a Distance: (Im)partiality, Moral Motivation and the Ethics of Representation - Partiality, Distance and Moral Obligation -- pg. 309 - 313 John Cottingham Volume 3, Number 3 of: Ethics, Place and Environment Fall 2000?

 

 

Biodiversity and Conservation

Table of Contents

Volume 9, Issue 8, August 2000

*          Background and aims of this Special Issue

Nigel S. Cooper, Michael J. Samways

pp. 1007-1008

*          Speaking and listening to nature ethics within ecology

Nigel S. Cooper

pp. 1009-1027

*          Biodiversity and environmental valuesin search of a universal

earth ethic

Bryan G. Norton

pp. 1029-1044

*          The land ethic at the turn of the millennium

Holmes Rolston

pp. 1045-1058

*          Redefining communitytowards an ecological republicanism

Patrick Curry

pp. 1059-1071

*          A conceptual model of ecosystem restoration triage based on

experiences from three remote oceanic islands

Michael J. Samways

pp. 1073-1083

*          A legal framework from ecology

Mariachiara Tallacchini

pp. 1085-1098

*          Ecology a science put to use

John Sheail

pp. 1099-1113

*          Valuing nature in contextthe contribution of common-good

approaches

Carolyn Harrison, Jacquelin Burgess

pp. 1115-1130

*          How natural is a nature reserve?an ideological study of British

nature conservation landscapes

Nigel S. Cooper

pp. 1131-1152

*          Planning for biodiversity conservation based on the knowledge of

biologists

Ant H. Maddock, Michael J. Samways

pp. 1153-1169

*          Ecological theories and Dutch nature conservation

Mechtild de Jong, Chunglin Kwa

pp. 1171-1186

*          Conservation of biodiversity in Romania

Viorel Soran, Jozsef Biro, Oana Moldovan, Aurel Ardelean

pp. 1187-1198

*          Three levels of integrating ecology with the conservation of South

American temperate foreststhe initiative of the Institute of Ecological

Research Chilo, Chile

Ricardo Rozzi, John Silander, Juan J. Armesto, Peter Feinsinger, Francisca

Massardo

pp. 1199-1217

 

William Viteck and Wes Jackson, eds., Rooted in the Land: Essays on Community and Place (Yale 1996). I have. Looks great: Addicted to work. Ehrenfeld, Berry on community, “Becoming Native.” In library.

 

Jeremy Rifkin, The Biotech Century,: Harnessing the Gene and Remaking the World

 

Jeremy Rifkin, The Biotech Century: Playing Ecological Roulette with Mother Nature’s Designs” in E magazine may/June 1998. I have print and on disk.

 

 

Martin Teitel and Kimberly A. Wilson, Genetically Engineered Food: Changing the Nature of Nature: What you Need to know to protect yourself, your family and our planet (Vermont: Inner Traditions, Int’l Ltd., 1999.

 

Anita Allen and Milton Regan, Debating Democracy’s Discontent: Essays on American Politics, Law and Public Philosophy, on Michael Sandel.1999 Oxford.

 

Amy Gutmann, ed., Freedom of Association, Princeton U. Press.

 

H. Peter Steeves, ed., Animal Others: On Ethics, Ontology and Animal life, SUNY 1999, continental take.

 

Robert Fullinwider, Civil Society, Democracy, and Civic Renewal, 1999, Rowman and Littlefield.

 

Harvey M. Jacobs, Who Owns America? Social Conflict over Property Rights, 1998, U. of Wisconsin Press.

 

William Alston, Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience, Cornell

 

Amitai Etzioni, The Essential Communitarian Reader, Rowmand and Littlefield,

 

Philo, a journal dealing with theism, humanism and naturalism, science relation to religion, article on def of humanism, Vol 1, ! Summer 1998. Put out by council for Secular Humanism.

 

Stephen Dycus, National Defense and the Environment, U. Press of New England, 1996

 

Eric Freyfogle, Bounded People, Boundless Land, Envisioning a New Land Ethic, 1998, Island Press.

 

Paul Shepard, Coming Home to the Pleistocene, 1998, Island Press.

Paul Shepard, ed. The Only World We’ve God: A Paul Shepard Reader 1996. I have.

The Only World We’ve Got, ed Paul Shepard, a Paul Shepard Reader. His intro looks pretty good, 11 pages,

 

Robert Meltz, et all, The Takings Issue: Constitutional Limits on Land Use Control and Environmental Regulation, 1998, Island Press

 

Katrina Brandon, et al., Parks in Peril: People, Politics and Protected Areas, Island Press 1998.

 

.

 

Albert E. Cowdrey, This Land, This South: An Environmental History, revised edition, U. of Kentucky Press

 

Dorinda Dallmeyer and Albert Ike, Environmental Ethics and the Golbal Marketplace, U. of Georgia, 1998. Includes Markku Okasnen on EE and concepts of private ownership.

 

 

William M. Lafferty, Democracy and the Environment, Edward Elgar Publishing Inc.

 

Leslie Stevenson and David Haberman, Ten Theories of Human Nature, 1998, Oxford.

 

Mulhall, Liberals and Communitarians, Backwell

 

Patterson, A Companion to Philoophy of Law and Legal Theory

 

Hugh LaFollette, Personal Relationships, Blackwell

 

 

Dryzek: Democracy in Capitalist Times, Oxford.

 

Steven Darwall, Philosophical Ethics, Westview Press

 

Shelly Kagan, Normative Ethics, Westview Press

 

May/Strikwerda, Rethinking Masculinity, 2nd ed., 1996 Rowman and Littlefield

 

Philosophy of Sex and Love: A Reader, Prentice Hall.

 

Baker, Wininger, and Elliston, eds., Philosophy and Sex, 3rd ed, Promethus

 

Clark, animals and their moral standing, Routledge

 

Cuomo, Feminism and Ecological Communities, Routledge

 

John Baden and Douglas Noonan, ed., Managing the Commons, 2nd ed., Indiana Univ Press

 

Karen Warren, Ecological Feminist Philosophies, Indiana U. Press.

 

Peter Quigley, Coyote in the Maze: Tracking Edward Abbey in ad world of words, University of Utah Press.

 

Kupperman, Value... and what follows, 1998 Oxford

 

Taber, The Struggle for Ecological Democracy.

 

Foster, Valuing Nature?, Routledge 1998 or earlier.

 

Kenneth Strike and Jonas Soltis, The Ethics of Teaching, 1998 Teachers college Press.

 

Charles Wilber, ed., Economics, Ethics and Public Policy Rowman and Littlefield, 1998, includes the Morality of Markets

 

George Sher and Baruch Brody, Political and Social Philosophy: contemporary Readings, 1999, Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

 

Encyclopedia of Applies Ethics, ed. By Ruith Chadwick, four volumes, $600.

 

Ed Ronald Rosenberg, Envrionment, Property and the Law, 1998 three volumes

 

Joseph Sax, Property Rights and the Economy of Nature, Understanding Lucas v. South Carolina Stanford Law Review 45, 1993

 

Benjamin Kline, First Along the River: A brief History of the U.s. Env. Movement, Acada Books, 1977.

 

 

Philosophies of the Environment and Technologies, Volume 18, 1999, Carl Mitcham Ed., Jai Press.

 

Janisse Ray, Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, 1999, Milkweed Editions.

 

Ecoviews: Snakes, Snails and Environmental Tales by Whit and Anne Gibbons (env. with a southern twist) U. of Alabama Press

 

John Barry, Environment and Social theory, Routledge,

 

Hugh Lafollette, ed., The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory, Blackwell 1999.

 

Julian Simon, Hoodwinking the Nation, Cato Institute, Published by Transaction

 

Partirck Machails et al., The Satanic Gases (says global warming is BS), Cato Institute.

 

Shelly Kagan, “Rethinking Intrinsic Value,” The Journal of Ethics 2 1998: 277-97 (talks about an intrinsically valuable extrinsic value).

 

Coclanis, Shadow of a Dream, Ecological life and death of Lowcountry

 

Robert Corrington, Ecstatic Naturalism, Indiana University press

Robert Corrington, Nature’s Religion, 1997, Rowman and Littlefield.

 

Arran Gare, Postmodernism and the Environmental Crisis, 1995 Routledge.

 

Arran Gare, Nihilism Inc.: Environmental Destruction and the Metaphysics of Sustainability 1996.

 

Minutes of the Lead Pencil Club, Bill? Anti-technology with Wendell Berry In Library

 

Journal of Ecosystem health, beginning March 1995.

 

Victor David Hanson, Field without Dreams, a non-glamor view of farming.

 

 

 

Reed Noss, Are human activities natural? Con Biology, Vol 10, 3, 1996 695-7.

 

Richard Brandt, Facts, Values, and Morality, Cambridge, 1996.

 

Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Religion and the Order of Nature, on Islanmic science and spirituality, 1996 Oxford.

 

Bernadette west et al., Michael Greenberg, The reporter’s environmental Handbook,

Peter Steinhart, The company of wolves, Knopf (about the Yellowstone wolf restoration and change in cultural symbolism.

 

David Macauley, Ed., Minding Nature: The Philosophers of Ecology, (continental env. phil) 1996 , Guilford publications.

 

Alfred Crosby, Germs, Seeds and Animals: Studies in Ecological Hisotry, 1993 M.E. Sharpe

Matthew Cahn and Rory O’Brien, thinking about the Environment: Readings on Politics, Property and the Physical world, ME Sharpe 1996.

 

Richard Posner and Katharine Silbaugh A guide to Sex Laws inthe U.S., 1996 u. of Chicago press.

 

 

Liberalism and the Moral Life, by Nancy Rosenbloon (liberalism’s response to communitarianism, liberals and community).

 

Carl Cohen, Naked Racial Preference: The case against Affirmative Action, U. Press of America 1995. In library.

 

Leslie Francis, Date Rape: Feminism, Philosophy and the Law, Penn State Press.

 

 

Robert Gottfried, Econmics, Ecology and the Roots of Western Faith, Hebrew worldview found in Torah is remarkably green (Jewish EE). 1995 Rowman and Littlefield

 

Joel Feinberg, Autonomy and Community (his 4th volume of that series).

 

Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan, Microcosmos, 1986 (on ecoservices of bacteria)

 

Carl Wellman, Real Rights, (Oxford, 1995) only agencs can be rights holders., children can have only limited rights, groups none.

 

 

Ethics and the Legal Profession, ed Michael Davis and Frderick Elliston, 295 pages, textbook Prometheus,

 

 

Christopher Stone, Should Trees Have Standing and other essays on law, morals and the environment, 1996 Oceana Publications

 

Wilson et al., Biodiversity II: , 1996 Joseph Henry Press book

 

National Research Council, Science and the Endangered Species Act, 1995 National Academy Press.

 

James I McClintock, Nature’s Kindred Spirits: Aldo Leopold, Joseph Wook Krutch, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard and Gary Snayder, 1994, U. of Wisconsin Press.

 

Stephen Brush and Doreen Stabinsky, Valuing Local Knowledge: Indigenous People and Intellectual Property rights, Island Press, 1996. In library

 

Jan Rissler and Margaret Mellon, The Ecological risks of Engineered Crops, 1996 MIT press

 

Louis Pojman, Equality, selected readings, 1996

 

Gary Francione, Rain without thunder: the ideology of the animal rights movement, Temple, 1996.

 

A. John Simmons, On the Edge of Anarchy: Locke, Consent and Limits of society, Princeton, 1995.

 

Religious experience and Ecological Responsibility (in Library?)

 

Business and the Environment: A reader, 1996 Richard Welford and Richard Starkey, Taylor and Francis.

 

 

A.A. Luce, Fishing and Thinking, 1959, reissued in 1993 by Ragged Mountain Press

 

Isac Walton, The Compleat Angler, 1653.

 

Christina and William Valente, Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy, West Publishing.

 

Michael Bradie, The secret chain: Evolution and Ethics, SUNY

 

Matthew Nitecki et al., eds., Evolutionary Ethics

 

Ridley and Low, Can selfishness save the environment, Atlantic Sept 98, Human Ecology Review has entire issue on this.

 

Midgley, Evolution as a Religion, Routledge

 

Sorabji, Animal Minds and Human Morals, Cornell U. Press around 1994

Peter Miller, 1981, Nature and System “Is Health an Antrhopocentric Value”

 

Charles Blatz, Ethics and Agriculture: An anthology of current issues in world context, University of Idaho press

 

Hugh Lehman, Rationality and Ethics in Agriculture, U. of Idaho press

 

David B. Morris, Earth Warrior: Overboard with Paul Watson and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Fulcrum Publishing, 1995

 

Animal Consciousness and Economy??, Philosophy of Biology, July 1995

 

Nancy Ann Davis, “Interest and Sentience,” Hastings Center Report, 24, 6 (1994)

 

Paul Angermeier and James Karr, “Bio integrity vs Biodiversity as policy directives, Bioscience, Nov 1994, 690-97

 

Richard Luppke, Radical Business Ethics, Rowman and Littlefield 1995.

 

John Hick, Disputed questions in Theology and Philosophy of Relgion,1993, Yale.

 

 


Wildlife, captive, medical treatment of wild animals

 

 

Mark A. Michael, Preserving Wildlife, Humanity Books 2002 includes medical treatment of wild animals, ethical considerations and animal welfare in eco field studies, Olympic goat controversy, captive breeding of endangered species, how to save African wildlife, elephants and economics, tourism as sustained use of wildlife. I have

 

AW Sainsbury, JK Kirkwood, "Welfare of wild animals in Europe: harm caused by human acivities, Animal Welfare 4, 183-206. Also see Kirkwood, et al, Animal Welfare 3: 257-273 "The welfare of free-living wild animals: Methods of assessment".

 

   Loftin, Robert W. (1985). "The Medical Treatment of Wild Animals," Environmental Ethics (7), 231-239.

 

Roland Clement, “Beyond the Medical Treatment of Wild Animals,” Environmental Ethics 8, Spring 1986.

 

Carl Strang, “The Ethics of Wildlife Rehabilitation,” Environmental Ethics 8, Summer 1986.

 

Holmes Rolston “Ethical Responsibilities toward Wildlife,” Journal of the American Veterinary Medicine Association 200 #5 (1992): 618-622.

 

Valuing Wildlife Populations in Urban Environments

Michelfelder Diane P.

Journal of Social Philosophy, Spring 2003, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 79-90(12)

 

Moulton, Michael P., Wildlife Issues in a Changing World. Delray Beach, FL: St. Lucie

Press, 1997. 352 pages. Includes discussion of accidentally or deliberately introduced

exotic wildlife, increasingly a problem on contemporary landscapes. Moulton is at the

University of Florida. (v8,#2)

 

 

Glenn Albrect: “Thinking like an ecosystem: the ethics of the relocation, rehabilitation and release of wildlife”, Vol 2, 1 1998 of Animal Issues.

 

Anthony Brandt, “Not in my Backyard,” Audubon 99,2 sept-Oct 97: Surburbanization of wildlife. Animals become inconvenient, like deer.

 

Sunquist, Fiona, "End of the Ark? International Wildlife 25 (no. 6, Nov./Dec. 1995):22-29. Captive breeding is out; conservation in the wild is in. Facing increasing disapproval of keeping animals in the captivity, Michael Hutchins, Director for conservation and science at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association, says: "The zoo profession is at an important crossroads in its history. The world is changing around us, and if we choose to conduct business as usual, we are not sure that zoos will ultimately survive. ... As zoos struggle to define what they are supposed to be and do, they're finding an ever-greater role in saving animals in the wild." William Conway, director of what was once the Bronx Zoo (now a "Conservation Park," says, "I don't believe there is any question but that every accredited North American zoo will have a significant field conservation effort within six years." At present, the budget for one good U.S. zoo can equal the entire budgets of all the national wildlife conservation agencies in countries south of the Sahara in Africa.

 

Shepherdson, David J., Mellen, Jill D. Hutchins, Michael, eds. Second Nature: Environmental Enrichment for Captive Animals. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997. 336 pp. $32.50. Moving beyond the usual studies of primates, contributors argue that whether an animal forages in the wild or plays computer games in captivity, the satisfaction its activity provides--rather than the activity itself--determines its level of physical and psychological well-being. (v8,#3)

 

 

PJS Olney, et al, eds. Creative Conservation: Interactive Management of Wild and Captive Animals (London: Chapman and Hall, 1994). (includes article on California condor extinction and reintroduction)

 

Ethics of the Ark: Zoos, Animal Welfare, and Wildlife Conservation ed. by Bryan Norton, et. al (Washington: Smithsonian Instituion Press, 1995). In library.


Begin Rolston Papers

 

 

 

Environmental Ethics - Publications

 

 

Academic Journals and Related Articles

 

 

Academic Journals and Related Articles

"Duties to Endangered Species," BioScience 35(1985):718-726. Special issue on biological conservation. Reprinted and translated variously, see chapters in books, anthologies.

 

"Is There an Ecological Ethic?" Ethics: An International Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 85(1975):93-109. Reprinted and translated variously, see chapters in books, anthologies. Download/Print in PDF Format, 1.8 mb. Also available online in most university and college libraries through Ethics, JSOR.

 

"Disvalues in Nature," The Monist 75(1992):250-278. Reprinted in Andrew Brennan, ed., The Ethics of the Environment (Aldershot, Hampshire, U.K.: Dartmouth Publishing Co., 1995), pages 87-115. Download/Print in PDF Format, 1.5 mb.

 

"Rights and Responsibilities on the Home Planet," Yale Journal of International Law 18 (no. 1, 1993):251-279. Invited paper at Symposium on Human Rights and the Environment, Yale Law School and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, April 1992. Short version reprinted in Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 28(1993):425-439.

 

"Caring for Nature: From Fact to Value, from Respect to Reverence," Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 39(no. 2, 2004):277-302. Invited Templeton Lecture, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, November 23, 2003. Download/Print in PDF format, 1.3 mb.

 

"Values Gone Wild," Inquiry 26(1983):181-207. Also published in proceedings, Third Annual Conference (1982), Wilderness Psychology Group (Morgantown, W.V.: Division of Forestry, West Virginia University, 1983). Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/Print in PDF format, 745 kb.

 

Electronically published (2000) in Discourses, the philosophy section of Primis (McGraw-Hill), an electronic database publication system that enables instructors to create customized anthologies for their courses. Web page: http://mhhe.com/primis/philo.

 

"Valuing Wildlands," Environmental Ethics 7(1985):23-48. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/Print in PDF format, 1.5 mb.

 

Holmes Rolston, "Biology and Philosophy in Yellowstone." Biology and Philosophy 5(1990):241-258. Reprinted in Susan Armstrong and Richard Botzler, eds., Environmental Ethics: Convergence and Divergence (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993), pages 28-38.

 

"Immunity in Natural History," Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (University of Chicago Press) 39(1996):353-372. Nobel Conference XXVIII Lecture at Gustavus Adolphus College, October 1992.

 

"Does Aesthetic Appreciation of Landscapes Need to be Science-Based?" British Journal of Aesthetics 35(1995):374-386. Download/Print in PDF format, 713 kb. Address at "Meeting in the Landscape," the First International Conference on Environmental Aesthetics," Koli, Finland, June 1994.

 

Reprinted in Joseph DesJardins, ed., Environmental Ethics: Concepts, Policy, Theory (Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Co., 1999), pages 164-171

 

"Property Rights and Endangered Species," University of Colorado Law Review 61(1990):283-306. Download/Print in PDF format, 1.2 mb.

 

Using Water Naturally, Natural Resources Law Center, University of Colorado, Western Water Policy Project, Discussion Series Paper No. 9, 1991. Shorter version in Kathleen C. Klein, ed., Seeking an Integrated Approach to Watershed Management in the South Platte Basin (Fort Collins, CO: Colorado Water Resources Research Institute, Colorado State University, 1993), pp. 3-8. Revised version in Illahee: Journal for the Northwest Environment 11 (nos. 1 & 2, 1995):94-98.

 

"Ethical Responsibilities toward Wildlife," Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 200(1992):618-622.

 

 

"The Wilderness Idea Reaffirmed," Environmental Professional 13(1991):370-377. Variously reprinted, see chapters in books, anthologies. Download/Print in PDF Format, 790 kb.

 

 

"Human Values and Natural Systems," Society and Natural Resources 1(1988):271-283.

 

"Engineers, Butterflies, Worldviews," The Environmental Professional 9(1987):295-301. Invited article in special issue: "Environmental Science and Values."

 

"Respect for Life: Can Zen Buddhism Help in Forming an Environmental Ethic?" In Zen Buddhism Today, No. 7, September 1989, pp. 11-30. Annual Report of the Kyoto Zen Symposium, Kyoto Seminar for Religious Philosophy, Institute for Zen Studies, Hanazono College and Kyoto University. Invited paper as distinguished lecturer at the Seventh Annual International Zen Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, March 1989.

 

Translated into Chinese in Zhexue Yicong (Philosophy Digest of Translation), (Journal of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of Philosophy, Beijing), Issue No. 5, September 1994):11-18.

 

"Values Deep in the Woods: The Hard-to-Measure Benefits of Forest Preservation." Pages 315-319 in Economic and Social Development: A Role for Forests and Forestry Professionals-- Proceedings of the Society of American Foresters, 1987 National Convention, Minneapolis. Bethesda, MD: Society of American Foresters, 1988. Invited lecture at the annual convention of the Society of American Foresters, October 1987, Minneapolis, MN.

 

Published in B. L. Driver, ed., Contributions of Social Sciences to Multipe-Use Management: An Update (Fort Collins, CO: Rocky Mountain Range and Experiment Station, 1990), USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM-196, October, pp. 6-19.

 

"Values Deep in the Woods." American Forests 94, nos. 5 & 6 (May/June 1988:33, 66-69. Also published in The Trumpeter (Canada) 6, no. 2 (Spring 1989):39-41. Download/print in PDF format, 1.8 mb.

 

Electronically reprinted on website, Ecospherics International, Inc., Lanark, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ecospherics.net Ted Mosquin, editor.

 

"A Forest Ethic and Multivalue Forest Management," co-authored with James Coufal, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse, Journal of Forestry 89(no. 4, 1991):35-40.

 

Translated into Chinese in Information about Ecophilosophy, at Northeast Forestry University, 1989. Translated by Ye Ping, Social Science Department, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China.

 

Translated, second time, into Chinese in Zhexue Yicong (Philosophy Digest of Translation), (Journal of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of Philosophy, Beijing), 1999, Issue No. 2, September, pages 27-31.

 

"The Nonhuman Dimensions in Wildlife." Human Dimensions in Wildlife, 8, no. 2 (Spring 1989): 6-8.

 

"Treating Animals Naturally?" Between the Species 5(1989):131-137.

 

"Can the East Help the West to Value Nature?" Philosophy East and West 37(1987)172-190.

 

"Technology versus Nature: What is Natural" in CPTS Ends and Means: Journal of the University of Aberdeen Centre for Philosophy, Technology & Society 2(no. 2, Spring 1998):3-14. This journal is also in electronic form:

http://www.abdn.ac.uk/cpts/techno.htm

 

"Values in Nature," Environmental Ethics 3(1981):113-128. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild.

 

Translated into Chinese by Yu Goping, Northeast Forestry University in Information of Ecophilosophy, an occasional publication of the Research Office in Ecophilosophy of the Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, 1989, No. 2.

 

Translated into Finnish in Markku Oksanen and Marjo Rauhala-Hayes, eds., Ymparistofilosofia: Kirjoituksia ymparistonsuojelun eettisista perusteista (Environmental Philosophy: Critical Sources in Environmental Theory and Ethics (Heksinki: Gaudeamus, Oy Yliopistokustannus, Finnish University Press, 1997), pages 205-224.

 

 

Holmes Rolston, "Can and Ought We to Follow Nature?" Environmental Ethics 1(1979):7-30. An invited article launching this journal. Also published in Holmes Rolston, Philosophy Gone Wild.

 

Reprinted in Andrew Brennan, ed., The Ethics of the Environment (Aldershot, Hampshire, U.K.: Dartmouth Publishing Co., 1995), pages 365-389.

 

Reprinted in Sebastiano Maffettone, ed., Public Philosophy (Naples, Italy: Liguori Editore, forthcoming), translated into Italian.

 

Reprinted in German translation in Dieter Birnbacher, ed., Okophilosophie (Ditzingen, Germany: Philipp Reclam jun. Stuttgart, Reclams Universal-Bibliothek, 1997), pp. 242-285.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese, "Zun xun da zi ran (Following Nature)" in Zhexue Yicong (Philosophy Translation Series), no. 4, 1998, pp. 36-42, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of Philosophy, Beijing.

 

Reprinted, March 1999, by The Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom in curriculum materials for a university and correspondence course, A211: Philosophy and the Human Situation.

 

"Can and Ought We to Follow Nature?" Reprinted in part in John Benson, Environmental Ethics: An Introduction with Readings (London: Routledge, 2000, pages 237-242.

 

 

"The Pasqueflower" Natural History (Magazine of the American Museum of Natural History), April 1979. Download/print in PDF format, 2.1 mb.Philosophical reflection on the pasqueflower as a floral sign of natural meaning.

 

Reprinted in Wilderness, vol. 29, no. 30, July 1990 (South Africa, Wilderness Leadership School), pp. 5-7. Also reprinted in Philosophy Gone Wild.

 

 

"On Behalf of Bioexuberance," Garden 11, no. 4 (July/August 1987): 2-4, 31-32. Article commissioned by New York Botanical Gardens, in consortium with fourteen botanical gardens around the U. S., for their journal.

 

Reprinted in The Trumpeter (Canada) 5, no. 1 (Winter 1988): 26-29. Reprinted in Wilderness Record: Proceedings of the California Wilderness Coalition, vol 17, no. 4, April 1992, p. 4.

 

Electronically reprinted on website, Ecospherics International, Inc., Lanark, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ecospherics.net. Ted Mosquin, editor. View/Download text.

 

 

"In Defense of Ecosystems," Garden 12, no. 4 (July/August 1988): 2-5, p. 32. Article commissioned by New York Botanical Gardens, in consortium with fourteen botanical gardens around the U. S., for their journal Garden.

 

"Yellowstone: We Must Allow It To Change," High Country News 23 (no. 10, June 3, 1991):12-13.

 

"The Irreversibly Comatose: Respect for the Subhuman in Human Life," Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7(1982):337-354. Jack P. Freer (Department of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, replies to this article in "Chronic Vegetative States: Intrinsic Value of Biological Process," Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9(1984): 395-407. Michael Seidler (Philosophy, Western Kentucky University) comments further in "`Unregarded Age in Corners Thrown': Moral Bases of our Duties toward the Diminished Elderly," Modern Schoolman 64(no. 4)(1989):257-282.

 

"Lake Solitude: The Individual in Wildness," Main Currents in Modern Thought 31(1975):121-126. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/Print in PDF Format, 524 kb.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese by Liu Er, in Huanjing yu Shehui (Environment and Society) 2 (no. 4, December 1999)

 

"Hewn and Cleft from this Rock: Meditation at the Precambrian Contact," Main Currents in Modern Thought 27(1971):79-83. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/Print in PDF Format, 436 kb.

 

"Philosophical Aspects of the Environmental Crisis," in Phillip O. Foss, ed., Environment and Colorado: A Handbook, (Fort Collins Colorado: Environmental Resources Center, Colorado State University, 1973), pages 41-46. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild.

 

"Community: Ecological and Ecumenical" in The Iliff Review 30(1973):3-14 (Iliff Theological Seminary, Denver). An invited article in this issue. Analysis of the inter-relations of theology and ecology.

 

"Does Nature Need To Be Redeemed?" Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 29(1994):205-229. Article awarded John Templeton Foundation award for best scholarly papers in religion, 1994. Also in Horizons in Biblical Theology 14 (no. 2, 1993):143- 172. Plenary address at Conference on "Creation, Ecology, and Ethics," Chicago, October 1992. Also invited address at American Academy of Religion, National Meeting, San Francisco, November 1992. Download/Print in PDF Format, 1.3 mb.

 

"Whose Woods These Are. Are Genetic Resources Private Property or Global Commons?" Earthwatch, vol. 12, no. 3 (March/April 1993): 17-18. Download/Print in PDF format, 190 kb.

 

"Order and Disorder in Nature, Science, and Religion." Pages 1-14 in George W. Shields and Mark Shale, eds., Science, Technology and Religious Ideas: Proceedings of the Institute for Liberal Studies, vol. 4 (Frankfort, KT: Institute for Liberal Studies, Kentucky State University, 1994). Keynote address at Institute for Liberal Studies, Conference on Science, Technology, and Religious Ideas, Kentucky State University, April 2-3, 1993.

 

"The Bible and Ecology," Interpretation: Journal of Bible and Theology 50(1996):16-26. Also translated into Japanese.

 

"Environmental Protection and an Equitable International Order: Ethics after the Earth Summit," Business Ethics Quarterly 5(1995):735-752.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese, in: Huanjing yu Shehui (Environment and Society) (Chinese Society for Environmental Ethics) 2(no. 2, June 1999):49-55 (trans. by Li Shili).

 

"Science, Advocacy, Human and Environmental Health," The Science of the Total Environment 184(1996):51-56. Article prepared for the International Society of Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE) and World Health Organization (WHO) and in theme issue on "Ethical and Philosophical Issues in Environmental Epidemology.

 

"Ecological Spirituality," American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 18(1997)59-64.

 

"Aesthetic Experience in Forests" Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56(1998):157-166. Download/print in PDF format, 792 kb. Address at The Aesthetics of the Forest, Second International Conference on Landscape Aesthetics,Lusto, Punkaharju, Finland. June 1996.

 

 

 

"Nature, the Genesis of Value, and Human Understanding," Environmental Values 6(1997):361-364.

 

 

"Wild Animals, Duties to." Pages 362-364 in Marc Bekoff wiApril 9, 2007th Carron A. Meaney, eds., Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998). 

 

"Endangered Species." Pages 154-156 in Marc Bekoff with Carron A. Meaney, eds., Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998).

 

Rolston, "Landscape from Eighteenth Century to the Present." Pages 93-99, volume 3, in Michael Kelley, ed., Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998).

 

"Philosophy and the Land Ethic," in Reflections: Newsletter of the Program for Ethics, Science, and the Environment, Oregon State University, Department of Philosophy, Special Issue 3, August 1998, p. 6.

 

"The Moral Case for Saving Species," Defenders: The Conservation Magazine of Defenders of Wildlife 73 (no. 3, Summer 1998):6-15. Thirteen philosophers explain why society should give high priority to the Endangered Species Act. Rolston essay on page 10.

 

"The Land Ethic at the Turn of the Millennium," Biodiversity and Conservation 9(2000):1045-1058. In a theme issue: Concepts of Nature: The Social Context and Ethical Implications of Ecology. Also available on website: http://www.kluweronline.nl.

 

"Environmental Science and Environmental Advocacy," Reflections: Newsletter of the Program for Ethics, Science, and the Environment, Oregon State University. Special Issue No. 4, April 2000, pp. 2-3.

 

"Preaching on the Environment," Journal for Preachers 23 (no. 4, 2000):25-32.

 

"Aesthetics in the Swamps," Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (University of Chicago; Johns Hopkins University) 43(2000):584-597. Download/print in PDF format, 783 kb.

 

"Environmental Ethics on Antarctic Ice," Polar Record (Cambridge University, Scott Polar Institute) 36(no. 199, October 2000):289- 290.

 

"Environmental Ethics in Antarctica," Environmental Ethics 24(2002):115-134.

 

"Biodiversity and Spirit," Science and Spirit 11(no. 4, November/December 2000):34. Epilogue, one-page essay in a theme issue on Science, Religion, and the Stewardship of Earth.

 

"Natural and Unnatural, Wild and Cultural," Western North American Naturalist 61(2001):267- 276. Originally the Aubrey L. Haines Distinguished Lecture at the Fifth Biennial Scientific Conference on the Great Yellowstone Ecosystem, National Park Service, Yellowstone National Park, WY, October 11-13, 1999.

 

"Die Umweltethik und der Mensch: Über intrinsische Werte in der Nature" (Environmental Ethics

and Humans: On Intrinsic Value in Nature)," Scheidewege: Jahresschrift für skeptisches Denken 33, 2003/2004, pages 251-266.

 

"Justifying Sustainable Development: A Continuing Ethical Search," Global Dialogue (Centre for World Dialogue, Nicosia, Cyprus) 4(no. 1, 2002):103-113.

 

"Entrevista: Dr. Holmes Rolston III (Interview: Dr. Holmes Rolston, III)," Ação Ambiental (Environmental Action), vol. 7, no. 30, September/October 2004, pages 5-8. This is the extension journal of the Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil, and this a theme issue on environmental philosophy. In Portugese. Interviewer James Griffiths.

 

 

Critical Notice

 

Wynn, Mark, "Natural Theology in an Ecological Mode," Faith and Philosophy 16(1999):27-42.

 

Ouderkirk, Wayne, "Can Nature Be Evil? Rolston, Disvalue, and Theodicy," Environmental Ethics 21(1999):135-150.

 

Cheney, Jim, "Naturalizing the Problem of Evil," Environmental Ethics 19(1997):299-313.

 

Attfield, Robin, "Evolution, Theodicy, and Value," Heythrop Journal 41(2000):281-296.

 

Benzoni, Francisco, "Rolston's Theological Ethic," Environmental Ethics 18(1996):339-352.

 

Richard L. Fern, Nature, God and Humanity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

 

Preston, Christopher J., "Epistemology and Intrinsic Values: Norton and Callicott's Critiques of Rolston," Environmental Ethics 20(1998):409-428.

 

Scoville, Judith N., "Value Theory and Ecology in Environmental Ethics: A Comparison of Rolston and Niebuhr," Environmental Ethics 17(1995):115-133.

 

Callicott, J. Baird, "Rolston on Intrinsic Value: A Deconstruction," Environmental Ethics 14(1992):129-143.

 

Davradou, Maria, and Namkoong, Gene, "Science, Ethical Arguments, and Management in the Preservation of Land for Grizzly Bear Conservation," Conservation Biology 15 (no. 3, June, 2001):570-577. The authors, in Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, assess Rolston's principles in environmental ethics for the conservation of grizzy bears and their habitat.

 

Mikael Stenmark, Environmental Ethics and Policy Making (London: Ashgate 2002). Rolston is one of the three principal figures analyzed for the impact of their environmental ethics on environmental policy.

 

Le Blanc, Jill, "A Mystical Response to Disvalue in Nature," Philosophy Today 45(2001):254-265.

 

Gregory Brown and Patrick Reed, "Validation of a Forest Values Typology for Use in National Forest Planning," Forest Science 46(2000):240-247. Brown and Reed experimentally validate Rolston's value topology in conserving values in national forest policy,

 

 

Graduate Theses

 

Rolston is one of two analyzed in Theodore W. Nunez, Rolston, Longergan, and the Intrinsic Value of Nature, Ph.D. thesis, 1999, Department of Religious Studies, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. Published (in part) as "Rolston, Lonergan, and the Intrinsic Value of Nature," Journal of Religious Ethics 27(no. 1, Spring, 1999):105-128. Commentaries by Nancy Frankenberry and Timothy P. Jackson, Journal of Religious Ethics 27(no. 1, Spring 1999):129- 136, 137-144; and reply by Nunez, 145-148.

 

Rolston's position in environmental ethics is one of three philosophers analyzed by Bruce Omundson, Moral Pluralism, Nonsentient Nature, and Sustainable Ways of Life, Ph.D. thesis, 1992, Michigan State University, Department of Philosophy.

 

Rolston is one of two analyzed in R. John Reiman, Toward an Ecological Ethic, Ph. D. thesis, 1991, Vanderbilt University.

 

Rolston is one of two principally analyzed in Glenn Gregory Garrison, Moral Obligations to Non-human Creation: A Theocentric Ethic, Ph.D. thesis, 1994, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Rolston is the principal figure analyzed in Bruce A. Anthony, Towards the Recognition of a Necessary Environmental Value, Ph.D. thesis, 1997, Department of Philosophy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, N.S.W., Australia.

 

Book Reviews

 

Book reviews are not listed here, but may be found in the International Society of Environmental Ethics Newsletter website bibliography.

 

   

 

 


 


                                       

 

 

Environmental Ethics - Publications

 

 

 

 

 

Chapters or Articles in Books, Part I

 

 

 

 

 

"Environmental Ethics." Pages 517-530 in Nicholas Bunnin and E. P. Tsui-James, eds., The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy, 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. Download/print in PDF format, 900 kb.

 

"Life and the Nature of Life--in Parks. Pages 103-113 in David Harmon and Allen D. Putney, eds., The Full Value of Parks: From the Economic to the Intangible. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2003. Download/print in PDF format, 512 kb. Reprinted in The George Wright Forum 21 (no. 2, June, 2004):69-77

 

"What Is our Duty to Nature?", one-page box essay, p. 681 in William K. Purves, David Sandava, Gordon H. Orians, and H. Craig Heller, Life: The Science of Biology, 7th ed. Sunderland MA: Sinauer Associates; W. A. Freeman, 2004. Download/print in PDF format, 470 kb.

 

"Ecology," in Carl Mitcham, ed., Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Reference USA, Thomson/Gale, 2005. Vol. 2, pp. 580-583.

 

"Challenges in Environmental Ethics." Pages 135-157 in Michael E. Zimmerman, J. Baird Callicott, George Sessions, Karen J. Warren, and John Clark, eds., Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1993. Pages 124-144, second edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1998. Pages 126-146, third edition 2001. Pages 82-101 in Michael E. Zimmerman, J. Baird Callicott, Karen J. Warren, Irene J. Klaver, and John Clark, eds., fourth edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2005.Download/print in PDF format, 1.2 mb.

 

Reprinted in David E. Cooper and Joy A. Palmer, eds., The Environment in Question (London: Routledge, 1992), pages 135-146.

 

Reprinted in Lawrence H. Hinman, ed., Contemporary Moral Issues: Diversity and Consensus, 2nd ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000), pages 587-604.

 

 

"Is There an Ecological Ethic?" in Donald Scherer and Thomas W. Attig, eds., Ethics and the Environment (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1983). First published in Ethics: An International Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 85(1975):93-109. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/print in PDF Format, 1.8 mb. Also available online in most university and college libraries through Ethics, JSOR.

 

Reprinted in Martin Wachs, ed., Ethics in Planning (New Brunswick, NJ: Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University, 1985).

 

Reprinted and translated into Chinese in Qiu Renzong, editor, Guowai Zirankexue Zhexuewenti 1990 (International Philosophical Problems in Natural Science 1990), Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institute of Philosophy. Beijing: Social Science Press, 1991. Translated by Ye Ping, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin.

 

Reprinted and translated into Russian in L. I. Vasilenko and V. E. Ermolaeva (Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences) eds., Globalniye Problemy i Obshchechelovecheskiye Tsennosti (Global Problems and Human Values) (Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1990), pp. 258-288.

 

Reprinted and translated into Hungarian in Laslo Molnar, ed., Kornyezeti etika (Environmental Ethics) (Budapest: Technical University of Budapest, 1996).

 

Reprinted and translated into Italian in Mariachiara Tallacchini, ed., Etiche della terra: Antologia di filosofia dell' ambiente (Milan: Vita e Pensiero, 1998), pages 151-171.

 

Reprinted in J. Baird Callicott and Clare Palmer, eds., Environmental Philosophy: Critical Concepts in the Environment (London: Routledge, 2005), vol. 1, pp. 54-71.

 

"Environmental Ethics: Values in and Duties to the Natural World." In F. Herbert Bormann, and Stephen R. Kellert, eds. Ecology, Economics, Ethics: The Broken Circle (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991), pp. 73-96. Download/print in PDF Format, 1.1 mb.

 

Reprinted in Lori Gruen and Dale Jamieson, eds., Reflecting on Nature: Readings in Environmental Philosophy (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994) pp. 65--84.

 

Reprinted in Richard G. Botzler and Susan J. Armstrong, eds., Environmental Ethics: Divergence and Convergence (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 1998), pp. 71-86.

 

Reprinted in Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler, eds., Environmental Ethics: Divergence

and Convergence, 3rd ed. (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004), pages 74-87.

 

Reprinted in Earl R. Winkler and Jerrold R. Coombs, eds., Applied Ethics: A Reader (London: Blackwell, 1993), pp. 271-292.

 

Reprinted in Donald VanDeVeer and Christne Pierce, eds., The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book: Philosophy, Ecology, Economics , 1st ed.(Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1994), pp. 88-93, 485-492.

 

Reprinted in Michael Boylan, ed., Environmental Ethics (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2001), pages 228-247.

 

Reprinted in David Schmidtz and Elizabeth Willott, eds., Environmental Ethics: Introductory Readings (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), pages 33-38.

 

Reprinted in part as "Why Species Matter," in Donald VanDeVeer and Christine Pierce, eds. The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book, 2nd ed. (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1998), pages 504-511.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese, in Ch'iu Jen-tsung, ed., Kuo wai tzy jan k'o hsueh che hsueh wen t'i (Philosophical Problems in Foreign Natural Science). Chung-kuo she hui k'o hsueh, 1994. Beijing: Chinese Social Science Press, 1994. ISBN 7-5004- 1514-1. Pages 276-295.

 

Reprinted, translated into Spanish as "Ética ambiental: Valores y deberes en el mundo natural," pages 293-317 in Teresa Kwiatkowska and Jorge Issa, eds, Los caminos de la ética ambiental (The Ways of Environmental Ethics) (C.P. 06470, Mexico, D.F.: Plaza y Valdés Editores, 1998).

 

Electronically reprinted on website, Ecospherics International, Inc., Lanark, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ecospherics.net. Ted Mosquin, editor. View/download text.

 

Summarized with commentary by Panagiotis Perros, Philosophy, National University in Athens, Greece, 2004. Online at http://filosofia.gr/ecoethics/

 

"The Land Ethic at the Turn of the Millennium." Reprinted in Susan J. Armstrong and Richard G. Botzler, eds., Environmental Ethics: Divergence and Convergence, 3rd ed. (Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004), pages 392-399. Originally in Biodiversity and Conservation 9(2000):1045-1058.

 

"Nature for Real: Is Nature a Social Construct?" In Timothy D. J. Chappell, ed., The Philosophy of the Environment (Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, 1997), pages 38-64. Download/print in PDF format, 1.4 mb.

 

"Are Values in Nature Subjective or Objective?" in Robert Elliot and Aaran Gare, Environmental Philosophy (St. Lucia, New York, London: University of Queensland Press and University Park, PA and London: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1983).

 

Reprinted in Louis P. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, second edition (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1998), pages 70-81, with response by Ernest Partridge, "Values in Nature: Is Anybody There?" and response by Rolston, "Values at Stake: Does Anything Matter?", pages. 88-90. Also published in Environmental Ethics 4(1982):125-151.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese, "Ziran zhong de jiashi shi zhuguande haishi keguande?" in Huanjing yu Shehai (Environment and Society) 1(no. 1, 1998):49-55, First half. Second half, 2(no. 1, 1999):53-57, second half. Liu Er, Ye Ping, translators.

 

"Naturalizing Values: Organisms and Species," in Louis P. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, 3rd ed. (Belmont CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2001), pages 76-86. Original article first published in this anthology. Download/print in PDF format, 1.3 mb. Paper given at American Philosophical Association, Washington, DC, December 1998. With published commentary, Ned Hettinger, "Comments on Holmes Rolston's `Naturalizing Values'," pages 86-89.

 

"Duties to Ecosystems," in J. Baird Callicott, ed. Companion to a Sand County Almanac (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1987), pp. 246-274.

 

"The Preservation of Natural Value in the Solar System," in Eugene C. Hargrove, ed., Beyond Spaceship Earth: Environmental Ethics and the Solar System (San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1986), pp. 140-182. Originally presented at conference on "Environmental Ethics and the Solar System," June 5-8, 1985, University of Georgia, Athens, and sponsored by EVIST, National Science Foundation, and the Planetary Society. Download/print in PDF format, 875 kb.

 

"The River of Life: Past, Present, and Future," in Ernest Partridge, ed., Responsibilities to Future Generations (Buffalo, NY: Prometheus Books, 1981), pp. 123-132. Download/print in PDF format, 560 kb.

 

Translated into Italian: "Il fiume di vita: passato, presente e futuro," Aut Aut: rivista di filosofia e di cultura, Issue 316-317, July-October 2003, pages 139-144. Translated by Roberto Peverelli.

 

"Nature and Human Emotions" in Fred D. Miller, Jr., and Thomas W. Attig, eds., Understanding Human Emotions (Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Studies in Applied Philosophy, 1979), volume 1, pages 89-96. Reprinted in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/print in PDF format, 220 kb.

 

"Beauty and the Beast: Aesthetic Appreciation of Wildlife," in D. J. Decker and G. Goff, Valuing Wildlife Resources: Economic and Social Perspectives (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1987), pp. 187- 207. Download/print in PDF format, 515 kb. Also published in The Trumpeter (Canada) 3, no. 3 (Summer 1986):29-34.

 

"Beyond Recreational Value: The Greater Outdoors," in Laura B. Szwak, ed., Americans Outdoors: A Literature Review (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1987) Paper commissioned by President's Commission on Americans Outdoors.

 

"The Human Standing in Nature: Fitness in the Moral Overseer," in Wayne Sumner, Donald Callen, and Thomas Attig, eds., Values and Moral Standing (Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Studies in Applied Philosophy, 1986), volume 8, pp. 90-101.

 

 

"Just Environmental Business." Chapter 11, pages 324-359, in Tom Regan, ed., Just Business: New Introductory Essays in Business Ethics (New York: Random House, 1984). Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Reprinted in Dale Westphal and Fred Westphal, eds., Planet in Peril: Essays in Environmental Ethics (Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1994), pp. 149-170. Download/print in PDF format, 1.1 mb. Available at:

http://lamar.colostate.edu/~hrolston/just-env-business.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

"Biology Without Conservation: An Environmental Misfit and Contradiction in Terms," in David Western and Mary C. Pearl, eds., Conservation for the Twenty-first Century (New York: Oxford University Press, 1989), pp. 232-240.

 

"Values Gone Wild" in Susan Armstrong and Richard Botzler, eds., Environmental Ethics: Convergence and Divergence (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993), pages 56-65. Originally published in Inquiry 26(1983):181-207. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild. Download/print in PDF format, 760 kb.

 

Electronically published (2000) in Discourses, the philosophy section of Primis (McGraw-Hill), an electronic database publication system that enables instructors to create customized anthologies for their courses. See web page: http://mhhe.com/primis/philo.

 

"Biology and Philosophy in Yellowstone." In Susan Armstrong and Richard Botzler, eds., Environmental Ethics: Convergence and Divergence, 1st edition, (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993), pages 28-38. Originally published in Biology and Philosophy 5(1990):241-258.

 

 

 

"The Value of Species," from "Duties to Endangered Species" (from BioScience 35(1985):718-726) reprinted in the anthology, Tom Regan and Peter Singer, eds., Animal Rights and Human Obligations, 2nd ed. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1989), pp. 252- 255.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species" (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in Robert Elliot, ed., Environmental Ethics, Oxford Readings in Philosophy Series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), pp. 60- 75.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species" (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in Raymond Bradley and Stephen Duguid, eds., Environmental Ethics, Volume II (Burnaby, BC: Simon Fraser University, Institute for the Humanities, 1989), pp. 67-83.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species" (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in James P. Sterba, ed., Earth Ethics: Environmental Ethics, Animal Rights, and Practical Applications (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice- Hall, 1995), pp. 317-328.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species " (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in James E. White, ed., Contemporary Moral Problems, 6th ed. (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2000), pages 585-594.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species" (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in Frederick A. Kaufman, Foundations of Environmental Philosophy: A Text with Readings (Boston: McGraw Hill, 2003), pp. 67-73.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species" (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in Andrew Brennan, ed., The Ethics of the Environment, in The International Research Library of Philosophy (Aldershot, Hampshire, U.K.: Dartmouth Publishing Co., 1995), pages 77-85. U.S. Distributor: Ashgate Publishing Co., Brookfield, VT.

 

"Duties to Endangered Species" (BioScience 35(1985):718-726). Reprinted in J. Baird Callicott and Clare Palmer, eds., Environmental Philosophy: Critical Concepts in the Environment (London: Routledge, 2005), vol. 4, pp. 263-277.

 

"Our Duties to Endangered Species," invited box essay in Gary K. Meffe and C. Ronald Carroll, eds., Principles of Conservation Biology (Sunderland, MA: Sinauer and Associates, 1994), pages 30- 31. 2nd edition, 1997, pages 35-36.

 

 

"Environment, Nature, and God," co-authored with Jack Weir (Department of Philosophy, Hardin-Simmons University). Chapter 22, pages 229-240, in Frederick Ferre, ed., Concepts of Nature and God (Athens: University of Georgia, Department of Philosophy, 1989). Proceedings of 1987 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute on Concepts of Nature and God.

 

"Science-Based vs. Traditional Cultural Values in a Global Ethic." Pages 63-72 in J. Ronald Engel and Joan Engel, eds., Ethics of Environment and Development. London: Belhaven Press and Tuscon: University of Arizona Press, 1990.

 

Published in Chinese translation in Ch'iu Jen-tsung, ed., Kuo wai tzy jan k'o hsueh che hsueh wen t'i (Philosophical Problems in Foreign Natural Science). Chung-kuo she hui k'o hsueh, 1994. Beijing: Chinese Social Science Press, 1994. ISBN 7-5004-1514-1. Pages 259-275.

 

"Life in Jeopardy on Private Property," in Kathryn A. Kohm, ed., Balancing on the Brink of Extinction: The Endangered Species Act and Lessons for the Future (Washington, D. C.: Island Press, 1991), pages 43-61.

 

"Creation and Recreation: Environmental Benefits and Human Leisure." In B. L. Driver, Perry J. Brown, and George L. Peterson, eds., Benefits of Leisure (State College, PA: Venture Publishing, Inc., 1991), pages 393-403.

 

"Fishes in the Desert--Paradox and Responsibility." In W. L. Minckley and James E. Deacon, eds., Battle Against Extinction: Native Fish Management in the American West, an anthology of the Desert Fishes Council. (Tuscon: University of Arizona Press, 1991), pages 93-108. Download/print in PDF Format, 1.0 mb.

 

"Wildlife and Wildlands: A Christian Perspective," in After Nature's Revolt: Eco-justice and Theology, Dieter T. Hessel, ed., (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992), pages 122-143. First published in Church and Society 80 (no. 4, March/April 1990):16-40.

 

Reprinted in part as "Christians, Wildlife, Wildlands," in Earth Letter, January 2001, pp. 4-6. (Earth Ministry, 1305 NE 47th St., Seattle, WA 98105).

 

Translated into Chinese in Dieter T. Hessel, ed., Shengtai gongyi: Dui dadi fanpuide xinyang fanxing (Taiwan: Diqiuri Chubanshe, 1997), pp. 233-256. Translated by Text Committee of the Taiwan Ecological Theology Center. ISBN 0-8006-2532-3.

 

"Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)." Pages 93-100 in Joy A. Palmer, ed., Fifty Key Thinkers on the Environment (London: Routledge, 2001).

 

"A Forest Ethic and Multivalue Forest Management," co-authored with James Coufal, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse. Reprinted in Peter C. List, ed., Environmental Ethics and Forestry: A Reader (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2000), pages 189-195. Originally in Journal of Forestry 89(no. 4, 1991):35-40.

 

"Naturalizing Callicott." Pages 107-122 in Ouderkirk, Wayne, and Hill, Jim, eds., Land, Value, Community: Callicott and Environmental Philosophy (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2002).

 

"Environmental Bioethics," in Goudie, Andrew S., Editor in Chief, Encyclopedia of Global Change, 2 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), vol. 1, pp. 399-401.

 

Environmental Ethics, reprint from Chapter 6, "The Concept of Natural Value" as "Valuing the Environment." Pages 208-211 in Mark J. Smith, ed., Thinking Through the Environment: A Reader (London: Routledge, 1999).

 

"From Beauty to Duty: Aesthetics of Nature and Environmental Ethics." Pages 127-141 in Arnold Berleant, eds., Environment and the Arts: Perspectives on Environmental Aesthetics (Aldershot, Hampshire, UK and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2002). Download/print in PDF format, 861 kb.

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Ethics - Publications

 

 

Chapters or Articles in Books, Part II

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Value in Nature and the Nature of Value." In Robin Attfield and Andrew Belsey, eds., Philosophy and the Natural Environment (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pages 13-30. Royal Institute of Philosophy, Annual Supplement Volume. Download/print in PDF format, 780 kb. Invited conference address, Royal Society of Philosophy, Annual Conference, University of Wales, Cardiff, July 18-21, 1993.

 

Reprinted in Andrew Light and Holmes Rolston, III, eds. Environmental Ethics: An Anthology (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2003), pages 143-153.

 

Reprinted, translated into German "Werte in der Natur und die Natur der Werte." In Angelika Krebs, ed., Naturethik. Grundtexte der gegenwartigen tier- und okoethischen Diskussion (Ethics of Nature: Fundamental Texts Discussing Contemporary Animal and Ecological Ethics) (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1997), pages 247-270.

 

Reprinted, translated into Danish, "Vaerdi i naturen og vaerdinens natur," in Mente Sorensen, Finn Arler, and Martin Ishoy, eds., Miljo og etik (Environment and Ethics) (Aarhus, Denmark: NSI Press, Nordisk Sommeruniversitet, 1997, pages. 17-38.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese, "Zi ran di jiazhi uu jiazhi di benzhi (Value in Nature and the Nature of Value)," Zi ran bian lun fa yet jiu (Studies in Dialectics of Nature) 15(no. 2, February, 1999):42-46 (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Institue of Philosophy, Beijing). ISSN 1000-8934. Translated by Liu Er.

 

Reprinted, translated into Chinese (second time), "Ziran de jiazhi yu jiazhi de benzhi (Value in Nature and the Nature of Value). Pages 5-12 in Ye Ping, ed., Huanjing yu kechixu fazhan yanjiu (For Environment and Sustainable Development). Harbin, China: Heilongjiang Science and Technology Press, 1998. ISBN 7-5388-3508-3. Selected proceedings of First All-China Conference on Environment and Development, held in Harbin, China, October 20-24, 1998.

 

Electronically published (2000) in Discourses, the philosophy section of Primis (McGraw-Hill), an electronic database publication system that enables instructors to create customized anthologies for their courses. Web page: http://mhhe.com/primis/philo.

 

 

 

"Nature and Culture in Environmental Ethics." Pages 151-158 in Klaus Brinkmann, ed., Ethics: The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, vol. 1 (Bowling Green, Ohio: Philosophy Documentation Center, 1999). Invited paper at the Session on Philosophy and the Natural Environment, Robin Attfield, Chair, World Congress of Philosophy, Boston, August 1998. Download/print in PDF format, 360 kb.

 

 

"Feeding People versus Saving Nature," in William Aiken and Hugh LaFollette, eds., World Hunger and Morality, 2nd ed. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996), pages 248-267. Download/print in PDF format, 1.1 mb., by permission of Pearson Education, Inc.

 

Reprinted in Roger S. Gottlieb, ed., The Ecological Community (London: Routledge, 1967), pages 208-225.

 

Reprinted in Hugh LaFollette, ed., Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, Ltd, 1997), pages 619-630. 2nd ed. (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, Ltd., 2002), pages 621-630.

 

Reprinted in Donald VanDeVeer and Christine Pierce, eds., The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book: Philosophy, Ecology, Economics, 2nd ed. (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1998), pages 409-420.

 

Reprinted in David Schmidtz and Elizabeth Willott, eds., Environmental Ethics: Introductory Readings (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), pages 404-416.

 

Reprinted in Andrew Light and Holmes Rolston, III, eds. Environmental Ethics: An Anthology (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2003), pages 451-462. With reply by Robin Attfield, "Saving Nature, Feeding People, and Ethics," pages 463-471.

 

Electronically reprinted on website, Ecospherics International, Inc., Lanark, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ecospherics.net Ted Mosquin, editor. View/download text.

 

Translated into German as "Menschen Ernahren oder Natur Erhalten?" in Conceptus: Zeitschrift fur philosophie 29(nr. 74, 1996):1-25, with reply,"Natur Erhalten oder Menschen Ernahren?" ("Saving Nature or Feeding People?") by Robin Attfield (Philosophy, University of Wales), Conceptus 29:27-45.

 

Reprinted in J. Baird Callicott and Clare Palmer, eds., Environmental Philosophy: Critical Concepts in the Environment (London: Routledge, 2005), vol. 4, pp. 23-40.

 

 

Three critical articles responding to "Feeding People versus Saving Nature," (in William Aiken and Hugh LaFollette, eds., World Hunger and Morality, 2nd ed., Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1996, pages 248-267) are:

 

(1) Robin Attfield (Philosophy, University of Wales, Cardiff), "Saving Nature, Feeding People and Ethics," Environmental Values 7(1998):291-304.

 

(2) Andrew Brennan (Philosophy, University of Western Australia), "Poverty, Puritanism and Environmental Conflict," Environmental Values 7(1998):305-331.

 

(3) Ben A. Minteer (School of Natural Resources, University of Vermont), "No Experience Necessary? Foundationalism and the Retreat from Culture in Environmental Ethics," Environmental Values 7(1998):333-348.

 

Rolston's response is "Saving Nature, Feeding People, and the Foundations of Ethics," Environmental Values 7(1998):349-357. Download/print in PDF format, 500 kb.

 

 

 

"The Wilderness Idea Reaffirmed," reprinted in Lori Gruen and Dale Jamieson, eds., Reflecting on Nature: Readings in Environmental Philosophy (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994), pp. 265-278. Originally in Environmental Professional 13(1991):370-377. Download/print in PDF format, 790 kb.

 

Reprinted in J. Baird Callicott and Michael P. Nelson, eds., The Great New Wilderness Debate (Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1998), pages 367-386.

 

Reprinted in John Lemons, ed., Readings from The Environmental Profesional: Natural Resources (Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Science Publishers, 1995), pages 108-115.

 

Reprinted in Andrew Brennan, ed., The Ethics of the Environment (Aldershot, Hampshire, U.K.: Dartmouth Publishing Co., 1995), pages 445-452.

 

Reprinted in Joseph DesJardins, ed., Environmental Ethics: Concepts, Policy, Theory (Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Co., 1999), pages 382-391. Originally in Environmental Professional 13(1991):370-377.

 

Reprinted (in part) in Bill Willers, ed., Unmanaged Landscapes: Voices for Untamed Nature (Washington, DC: Island Press, 1999), pp. 179-183.

 

Reprinted in James E. Coufal and Charles M. Spuches, Environmental Ethics in Practice: Developing a Personal Ethic. Materials for Natural Resources Management Instructors (Syracuse, NY: SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 1995).

 

 

 

 

"Endangered Species and Biodiversity: Ethical Issues" in Encyclopedia of Bioethics, Revised Edition, Warren T. Reich, ed. (New York: Macmillan Library Reference, Simon and Schuster, 1995), pages 671-75. Pages 748-752, vol. 2, in Encyclopedia of Bioethics, 3rd ed., Stephen G. Post, Editor-in-Chief (New York: Macmillan Reference/Thompson Gale, 2004).

 

"Wildlife Conservation and Management: Ethical Issues" in Encyclopedia of Bioethics, Revised Edition, Warren T. Reich, ed. (New York: Macmillan Library Reference, Simon and Schuster, 1995), pages 176-80. "Animal Welfare and Rights III. Wildlife Conservation and Management," pages 201-204, vol. 1, in Encyclopedia of Bioethics, 3rd ed., Stephen G. Post, Editor-in-Chief (New York: Macmillan Reference/Thompson Gale, 2004).

 

"Duties to Endangered Species." Volume 1, pages 517-528 in Encyclopedia of Environmental Biology, 4 vols. San Diego, CA: Academic Press, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1995. Download/print in PDF format, 900 kb.

 

 

 

 

 

"Biophilia, Selfish Genes, Shared Values" Pages 381-414 in Stephen R. Kellert and Edward O. Wilson, eds., The Biophilia Hypothesis: A Theoretical and Empirical Inquiry (Washington: Island Press, 1993).

 

"Environmental Ethics: Some Challenges for Christians." In Harlan Beckley, ed., The Annual: Society of Christian Ethics (Washington: Georgetown University Press, 1993), pages 163-186. Reprinted in Church and Society, July/August 1996, pages 37-50. Reprinted in The Egg: An Eco-Justice Quarterly (Environmental Justice Working Group of the National Council of Churches) vol. 13, no. 3 (summer 1993):6-10, 18. Keynote address at the Society of Christian Ethics, Annual National Conference, Savannah, GA, January 8-10, 1993.

 

"Winning and Losing in Environmental Ethics." In Frederick Ferré‚ and Peter G. Hartel, eds., Ethics and Environmental Policy: Theory Meets Practice (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994), pages 217-234.

 

Also published in John Echeverria and Raymond Booth Eby, Let the People Judge: Wise Use and the Private Property Rights Movement (Washington: Island Press, 1995), pages 263-273. Condensed version published in IRAS Newsletter (Institute on Religion in an Age of Science), vol 40, no. 3, 15 April 1992, pp. 2-3.

 

 

 

 

"Global Environmental Ethics: A Valuable Earth." In Richard L. Knight and Sara F. Bates, eds., A New Century for Natural Resources Management (Washington, DC: Island Press, 1995), pages 349-366. Also published in Ye Ping, et al, eds., Sheng t'a huan ching pao hu tzu jan tzu yuan kuan li ti li lun yen chiu (A Theoretical Study of Ecological Environmental Protection and Management of Natural Resources). He-lung chiang k'o hsueh chi shu ch'u pan she, 1995. ISBN 7-5388-2729-3 (Harbin, China: Scientific and Technological Publishing Co., 1995), pages 67-83.

 

"Creation: God and Endangered Species." In Ke Chung Kim and Robert D. Weaver, eds., Biodiversity and Landscape (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pages 47-60. Also published in Lawrence S. Hamilton, ed., Ethics, Religion and Biodiversity (Cambridge, England: The White Horse Press, 1993), pages 40-64. Download/Print in PDF format, 625 kb.

 

Electronically reprinted on website, Ecospherics International, Inc., Lanark, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ecospherics.net Ted Mosquin, editor. View/download text.

 

"The Value of Life for Itself," in Elliott A. Norse, ed., Global Marine Biological Diversity: A Strategy for Building Conservation into Decision Making (Washington, DC: Island Press, 1993), pages 34-36.

 

"Foreword" in Laura Westra, An Environmental Proposal for Ethics: The Principle of Integrity (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1994), pages xi-xiii.

 

"Foreword" in Louis P. Pojman, ed., Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application (Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc., 1994), pages xv-xvi.

 

"Foreword" in Don E. Marietta, Jr., For People and the Planet: Holism and Humanism in Environmental Ethics (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995), pages ix-xii.

 

"Foreword" in Erazim Kohak, The Green Halo: A Bird's Eye View of Ecological Ethics. Chicago: Open Court, 2000), pp. xv-xvii.

 

"Down to Earth: Persons in Place in Natural History." Pages 285-296 in Andrew Light and Jonathan M. Smith, eds., Philosophy and Geography III: Philosophies of Place. Lanham, MD: Roman and Littlefield, 1998.

 

"Down to Earth: Persons in Place in Natural History." In Rana P. B. Singh, ed., Environmental Ethics: Discourses, and Cultural Traditions: Festschrift to Arne Naess (Varanasi, India: The National Geographical Society of India, 1993), pages 55-63; also published as the National Geographical Journal of India, vol. 39, parts 1-4, 1993.

 

"People, Population, Prosperity, and Place." In Noel J. Brown and Pierre Quibler, eds., Ethics and Agenda 21: Moral Implications of a Global Consensus (New York: United Nations Publications, United Nations Environment Programme, 1994), pages 35-38. Ethical evaluation of the UN strategy document from the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Rio Earth Summit).

 

"Environmental Protection and an Equitable International order: Ethics after the Earth Summit." In Donald A. Brown, compiler, Proceedings of the Interdisciplinary Conference Held at the United Nations on the Ethical Dimensions of the United Nations Program on Environmental and Development, Agenda 21 (Camp Hill, Pa: Earth Ethics Research Group, 1994), pages 267-284.

 

 

"Aesthetic Experience in Forests." Reprinted in Peter C. List, ed., Environmental Ethics and Forestry: A Reader (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2000), pages 80-92. Download/print in PFD format, 792 kb. Originally in Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56(1998):157-166.

 

Reprinted in Allen Carlson and Arnold Berleant, eds., The Aesthetics of Natural Environments (Peterborough, Ontario: Broadviesw Press, 2004), pages 182-196.

 

Reprinted, translated into Finnish, in Yrjö Sepänmaa, ed. Metsään Mieleni (Helsinki: Maahenski, 2003), pages 31-47.

 

"Restoration," in William Throop, ed., Environmental Restoration (Amherst, NY: Humanity Books, Prometheus Press, 2000), pp. 127-132. Reprinted from Conserving Natural Value (New York: Columbia University Press, 1994), Chapter 3, Section 5, pp. 88-93.

 

"Can and Ought We to Follow Nature?" in German translation as "Konnen und sollen wir der Natur folgen?" in Dieter Birnbacher, ed., Okophilosophie (Ditzingen, Germany: Philipp Reclam jun. Stuttgart, Reclaims Universal Bibliothek, 1997), pages. 242-285.

 

Reprinted in Andrew Brennan, ed., The Ethics of the Environment, in The International Research Library of Philosophy (Aldershot, Hampshire, U.K.: Dartmouth Publishing Co., 1995). U.S. Distributor: Ashgate Publishing Co., Brookfield, VT.

 

Reprinted by The Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom in curriculum materials for a university and correspondence course, A211: Philosophy and the Human Situation. Reprinted March 1999.

 

Reprinted in part in John Benson, Environmental Ethics: An Introduction with Readings (London: Routledge, 2000, pages 237-242.

 

Reprinted in J. Baird Callicott and Clare Palmer, eds., Environmental Philosophy: Critical Concepts in the Environment (London: Routledge, 2005), vol. 1, pp. 175-198.

 

"What Is Responsible Management of Private Rangeland?" In Larry D. White, ed., Private Property Rights and Responsibilities of Rangeland Owners and Managers (College Station, Texas: Texas A&M University, 1995), pages 39-49. Proceedings from a conference of the Texas Section of the Society for Range Management.

 

 

"Humans Valuing the Natural Environment," in Barbara MacKinnon, Ethics: Theory and Contemporary Issues, 2nd ed., (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1998), pages 331-341. 3rd ed, 2001, pages 372-382. Reprinted from Rolston, Environmental Ethics, chapter 1.

 

"Environmental Ethics in the Undergraduate Philosophy Curriculum." In Jonathan Colett and Stephen J. Karakashian, eds., The Environment: Conservation of Biodiversity, and Sustainable Development: A Multidisciplinary Guide for College Teachers (Washington, DC: Island Press, 1996), pages 206-234.

 

"Nature, Spirit, and Land Management." Pages 17-24 in Beverly L. Driver, Daniel Dustin, Tony Baltic, Gary Eisner, and George Peterson, eds., Nature and the Human Spirit: Toward an Expanded Land Management Ethic (State College, PA: Venture Publishing Co., 1996). Anthology published by a U.S. Forest Service task force.

 

"Earth Ethics: A Challenge to Liberal Education." Pages 161- 192 in J. Baird Callicott and Fernando Jos‚ R. da Rocha, eds., Earth Summit Ethics: Toward a Reconstructive Postmodern Philosophy on the Atlantic Rim (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996). Keynote address at Conference on Ethics, University, and Environment" at Federal University of Rio Grande Do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil, May 25-29, 1992.

 

"Nature, Culture, and Environmental Ethics / Narava, kultura in etika okolja." Pages 25-42 in Dusan Ogrin, ed., Varstvo narave zunaj zavarovanih obmocij / The Conservation of Nature Outside Protected Areas (Ljubljnana, Slovenia: Urad RS za prostorska planiranje, Ministrstvo za okolje in prostor / Office for Physical Planning, Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning, Republic of Slovenia, and Institut za krajinsko arhitekturo, Biotehniska fakulteta / Institute of Landscape Architecture, University of Ljubljana, 1966). In English and also translated into Slovenian. Conference proceedings from European Union, Conference on the Conservation of Nature Outside Protected Areas, Ljubljana, Slovenia, November 1995.

 

 

 

"Environmental Science and Environmental Advocacy." Pages 137-153 in Anders Nordgren, ed., Science, Ethics, Sustainability: The Responsibility of Science in Attaining Sustainable Development, Centre for Research Ethics, University of Uppsala, Sweden. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, Studies in Bioethics and Research Ethics 2 (Uppsala, Sweden, Centre for Research Ethics, 1997).

 

 

"Values in Nature." Translated into Finnish in Markku Oksanen and Marjo Rauhala-Hayes, eds., Ymparistofilosofia: Kirjoituksia ymparistonsuojelun eettisista perusteista (Environmental Philosophy: Critical Sources in Environmental Theory and Ethics (Heksinki: Gaudeamus, Oy Yliopistokustannus, Finnish University Press, 1997), pages 205-224. Originally in Environmental Ethics 3(1981):113-128. Also published in Philosophy Gone Wild.

 

"Humans Valuing the Natural Environment," in Barbara MacKinnon, ed., Ethics: Theory and Contemporary Issues, second edition (Belmont: CA: Wadsdworth Publishing Co., 1998), pages 331-341. 3rd ed, 2001, pages 372-382. Reprinted from Environmental Ethics, Chapter 1.

 

 

"Using Water Naturally," revised version in Building Clean Water Communities: Proceedings, Sixth Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Management Workshop, 1998, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 7, March 23-25, Lawrence, KS, pages 70-84, Judy Scherff, Coordinator. Originally published by Natural Resources Law Center, University of Colorado, Western Water Policy Project, Discussion Series Paper No. 9, 1991.

 

"Ethics on the Home Planet." Pages 107-139 in Anthony Weston, ed, An Invitation to Environmental Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. Download/print in PDF format, 1.3 mb.

 

 

"Ethics in Ecosystems," in Mark Smith, ed., Thinking Through the Environment (London: Routledge, forthcoming). Reprinted from Environmental Ethics: Values in and Duties to the Natural World (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1988), Chapter 6.

 

"A Managed Earth and the End of Nature?" Pages 143-164 in Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino, Lester Embree, and Don E. Marietta, eds. The Philosophies of Environment and Technology, vol. 18 of Research in Philosophy of Technology (Stamford, CT: JAI Press, 1999). Download/print in PDF format, 1.1 mb.

 

"Ethics and the Environment" (Types of Environmental Ethics). Chapter 11 in Emily Baker and Michael Richardson, eds., Ethics Applied, edition 2 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1999), pages 407-437.

 

"Respect for Life: Counting What Singer Finds of No Account." Pages 247-268 in Dale Jamieson, ed., Singer and His Critics (Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers, 1999).

 

Translated into German: "Das berucksichtigen, was Singer als belanglos ansieht." Natur und Kultur: Transdisziplinaere Zeitschrift fuer oekologische Nachhaltigkeit 2(no. 1, 2001):97-116.

 

"Biodiversity and Endangered Species," in Dale Jamieson, ed., A Companion to Environmental Philosophy (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2001), pp. 402-415

 

"Values Deep in the Woods." Reprinted in Peter C. List, ed., Environmental Ethics and Forestry: A Reader (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2000), pages 75-79. Originally in American Forests 94, nos. 5 & 6 (May/June 1988:33, 66-69.

 

Electronically reprinted on website, Ecospherics International, Inc., Lanark, Ontario, Canada. http://www.ecospherics.net Ted Mosquin, editor. View/download text.

 

"Valuing Wildlands." Reprinted in R. Kerry Turner, Kenneth Button, and Peter Nijkamp, eds. Ecosystems and Nature: Economics, Science and Policy (Cheltenham, Gloucester, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Co., 1999), pages 463-488. Originally in Environmental Ethics 7(1985):23-48.

 

Reprinted in J. Baird Callicott and Clare Palmer, eds., Environmental Philosophy: Critical Concepts in the Environment (London: Routledge, 2005), vol. 3, pp. 320-346.

 

"Enforcing Environmental Ethics: Civic Law and Natural Value." Pages 349-369 in James P. Sterba, ed., Social and Political Philosophy: Contemporary Perspectives. London: Routledge, 2001.

 

Reprinted (in part) in International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education (International Geographical Union, Channel View Publications, Clevedon, UK): 11 (no. 1, 2002):76-79.

 

 

 

 

"Intrinsic Values in Nature." Pages 76-84 in II Congresso Brasileiro de Unidades de Conservaçao, Anais, vol 1., Conferências e Palestras, organizers Miguel Serediuk Milano and Verônica Theulen (Proceedings of the Second Brazilian Congress on Conservation Areas, November 5-9, 2000, Campo Grande, Brazil.

 

"What Do We Mean by the Intrinsic Value and Integrity of Plants and Animals?" Pages 5-10 in David Heaf and Johannes Wirz, eds., Genetic Engineering and the Intrinsic Value and Integrity of Plants and Animals, Proceedings of a Workshop at the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, UK. Dornach, Switzerland: Ifgene, International Forum for Genetic Engineering, 2002. Keynote address at the conference.

 

"In Situ and Ex Situ Conservation: Philosophical and Ethical Concerns." Pages 21-39 in Edward O. Guerrant, Jr., Kathy Havens, and Mike Maunder, eds. Ex Situ Plant Conservtion: Supporting Species in the Wild. Society for Ecological Restoration International and Center for Plant Conservation. Washington, DC: Island Press, 2004.

 

"Environmental Virtue Ethics: Half the Truth but Dangerous as a Whole." Pages 61-78 in Ronald Sandler and Philip Cafaro, eds., Environmental Virtue Ethics. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2005. Download/Print in PDF format, 1.1 mb.

 

Translated into German, "Umwelt-Tugendethik: Die halbe Warheit - Sie für das Ganze zu halten, ist aber gefährlich (Environmental Virtue Ethics: Half the Truth but Dangerous as a Whole)," in Natur und Kultur 6/2 (2005):93-112.

 

 

Research Conference

 

The following papers appear in an issue of the Center for Theology and Natural Sciences Bulletin, vol. 11, no. 2, the proceedings of a research conference devoted to Rolston's work at the Center for Theology and Natural Sciences, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, CA, February 8-16, 1991.

 

"Respect for Life: Christians, Creation, and Environmental Ethics," pp. 1-8.

 

"Genes, Genesis, and God in Natural and Human History, pp. 9- 23.

 

   

 

 

End Rolston Papers


 


ETHICS OF CONSUMPTION

 

Juliet Schor Clothes Encounters (October 2004) and Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture, Scribner 2004)

 

David Crocker and Toby Linden, The Ethics of Consumption Rowman and Littlefield, 1997 (564 pages)

 

Technology and the Good Life by Eric Higgs (Editor), Andrew Light (Editor), David Strong 2000. Davis Baird thinks this is good. Reviewed in EE fall 2003. Possibly good says Ned: Intro by Higgs, Light, Strong, or Durbin’s short phil of tech retro and prospective views?? Or Thomas Power’s article “Trapped in Consumption: modern Social Structure and the Entrenchment of the Devise” (really about how economy traps people in consumption)

 

“Ethics of Seeing: consuming Environments” Ethics and the Environment 9,2 Fall/Winter 2004 includes “‘You belong Outside’: Advertising, Nature and the SUV”; papers by communications professors.

 

Cafaro, Philip, "Less is More: Economic Consumption and the Good Life." Philosophy Today 42(1998): 26-39. We should judge economic consumption on whether it improves or detracts from our lives, and act on that basis. The issue of consumption is placed in the context of living a good life, in order to discuss its justifiable limits. Two important areas of our economic activity, food consumption and transportation, are examined from an eudaimonist perspective. From the perspective of our enlightened self-interest, we see that when it comes to economic consumption, less is more. Not always, and not beyond a certain minimum level. But often, less is more; especially for the middle and upper class members of wealthy industrial societies. This is the proper perspective from which to consider environmentalists' calls for limiting consumption in order to protect nature. (v.9,#3)

Dale Jamieson, Companion to Environmental Philosophy, Blackwell Publishing 2001, includes

34. Consumption: Mark Sagoff (Institute For Philosophy and Publc Policy).

 

http://www.swt.org/

http://www.timesizing.com/

www.freetimeday.org

http://www.pbs.org/kcts/affluenza/

 

Duane Elgin, Voluntary Simplicity, 1981.

 

Redefining Progress, voluntary simplicity, Atlantic Monthly.

 

Dr. David E. Shi The Simple Life: Plain Living and High Thinking in American Culture (1985)

 

Robin and Dominguez, Your Money Or Your Life

 

The Ethics of Waste: How We Relate to Rubbish by Gay Hawkins Nov 2004 Rowman and Littlefield

 

Sharing Nature's Interest : Ecological Footprints as an Indicator of Sustainability by Nicky Chambers, Craig Simmons, Mathis Wackernage 2001 Earthscan Pubns Ltd; ISBN: 1853837393

 

Affluenza: The All-Consuming Epidemic by John De Graaf, David Wann, Thomas H. Naylor, Redefining Progress 2001 Berrett-Koehler ; ISBN: 1576751511

 

 

By John de Graaf, Editor, Take Back Your Time: Fighting Overwork & Time Poverty In America

 

In office of media and technology, 2nd floor Ed. Ctr get Affluenza video and “Escape from Affluenza”

 

Graceful Simplicity: Toward a Philosophy and Politics of Simple Living by Jerome M. Segal, © 1999 by Jerome M. Segal. Published by Henry Holt and Company LLC.

 

http://www.puaf.umd.edu/IPPP/spring_summer99/simple_creatures.htm

 

Radically simple video from bullfrog films.

 

Segal, Consumer Expenditures and the Growth of Need-Required Income in Crocker, eds, Ethics of Consumption

 

Paul Wachtel, Alternatives to the Consumer Soceity, in Crocker, eds, Ethics of Consumption

 

 

 John De Graff: Turbocapitalism, Robert Franks, Winner Take All Society